Lake Pedder Things to Do

  • Dramatic lifting of the fog
    Dramatic lifting of the fog
    by iandsmith
  • McPartlans canal
    McPartlans canal
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  • Lake Pedder and the rising mist
    Lake Pedder and the rising mist
    by iandsmith

Most Recent Things to Do in Lake Pedder

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    The walks

    by iandsmith Updated Jun 28, 2009

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    The lure of Mount Anne
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    There are walks all around Lake Pedder. Hundreds of them if you really get serious but certainly dozens if you're just a day tripper like me.
    And they go to weird and wonderful parts of Australia. They range from 15 minutes to weeks, it just depends on your commitment.
    This particular one is for the fit among you only and takes you to the top of Mount Eliza, the 2nd highest peak in the area, though my original goal was Mount Anne. I had thought it was a 5 hour return walk but it turned out that Mount Anne was 5 hours one way.
    As it transpired I spent 6 1/2 hours going to Mount Eliza and a little beyond (see next tip) and, believe me, apart from five minutes at the start and another five minutes after the first ascent, it's all uphill, some of it seriously uphill.
    The rewards are splendid views over Lake Pedder and the satisfaction of having made it, but, little did I know just how excited I would be about 15 minutes later.

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    Climbing The Sentinel

    by iandsmith Updated Jun 28, 2009

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    Stunning view of the mountain from the road
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    I returned in 2009 and one of the things I wanted to do was climb the Sentinel. At 963 metres it's no Everest but then again I'm no latter day Edmund Hilary and I was 62 years old.
    You have to cross Wedge River first but that's fairly easy as there's a few logs and it's not that deep anyway.
    Immediately you come across a bog for about 50 metres and then have to sign the register book. After that you start to climb slowly and might even see a black snake like I did before you reach the base of the cliffs and then it starts to get serious. At times you have to use your hands to scramble up the steeper parts but, at the hour and a half mark, you should have reached the top and had a look around.
    Some of the views are spectacular and there's a sense of achievement but it was a little hazy the day I was there as it often is.
    Still, I have boasting rights, how many other VTers have been up there?

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    • Mountain Climbing

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    Morning by the lake

    by iandsmith Written Mar 15, 2009

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    Dramatic lifting of the fog
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    I'd spent the night at Ted's Camp, an overnight spot for those with tents and/or caravans or motorhomes.
    There are free toilets and some shelter there and it's right on the lake but, come sunrise, I wasn't all that sure it was the best place to be.
    So it was that I headed back to McPartlans Landing. It was a stab in the dark, literally.
    I'd never been there before in my life and it was covered in dense morning mist that took some time to rise, so I made myself a cup of tea and waited, and waited.
    Eventually it started to lift and, as the fog dispersed, I rattled off shot after shot till I managed triple figures.
    I like to think I got some nice ones, what do you think?

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    • Kayaking

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    Saving Upper Florentine

    by iandsmith Written Mar 3, 2009

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    This will disappear it the forest is logged
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    There's a forest called the Upper Florentine, so called because it sits around the Florentine River. At one point it was in a World Heritage area but has since been taken out. The Forestry people want to flatten it and remove the trees, some people want to save it. I am numbered among the latter.
    This stand is situated beyond Maydena on the way to Lake Pedder. There are people who are living in the trees, blockading the road and other diversions in an effort to save it. Now that I have personally seen it, I wish them well.
    At one stage 65 police and Forestry people came to remove them with some limited success. All the blockades have returned but there is two kilometres of road that has been laid through this old growth forest. Following this a delegation from both the Wilderness Society and the Forestry people came with parliamentarians to view the scene. The outcome is still to be decided. All what you see in my pictures will disappear if it gets clear felled.

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    The others

    by iandsmith Written Feb 16, 2008

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    Condominium Creek
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    It seems I must have taken a lot of shots while I was in the area and it seemed a shame to waste all of them so I've slotted a few more worthy ones here that I couldn't seem to fit in the other tips.
    The first one was taken near a camp site at the start of the walk to Mount Anne though you'd be hard pressed to go there as it's so easy just to pass by the site. I actually bush bashed my way through and then found the camp before returning on the made track.
    Pic 4 was a tiny bay that has an access road going to it where I imagine people would launch boats on occasions.

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    Ode to Lake Pedder

    by iandsmith Written Feb 15, 2008

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    Magical Lake Pedder
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    While in Strathgordon I came across this poem:
    YOU ASK ME WHY I LIVE HERE
    So you ask me why I live here,
    Then let me tell you why,
    In this rugged wondrous place
    Where mountains reach the sky.
    Here, where man is an intruder
    Amid the forest and the ferns,
    where sunshine into rainfall
    So often quickly turns.
    You ask me why I live here,
    When most would find severe
    The mist enshrouded mountains,
    And deep enchanted mere.
    Where cries of cockatoo & currawong
    Will often break the peace,
    Whose calling is a ritual
    Which never seems to cease.
    You ask me why I live here,
    When by the lake I stand
    With rod and line and tackle
    Gripped firmly in my hand.
    Where fishing is a pretext
    For what I try to find
    A peace and oneness with my world
    And, for me, my peace of mind.
    And you ask me why I live here.
    Tony Nosworthy

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    • Fishing
    • Arts and Culture

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    The climax - Lake Judd

    by iandsmith Written Feb 8, 2008

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    Lake Judd, a wonder of Tasmania
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    The walk over was through gorgeous alpine vegetation with an abundance of colours (pics 3 & 4). Here and there the occasional small tarn added to spectacle.
    At the top I decided that if I went a short way over I might get some shots looking in the opposite direction.
    I neared the edge and, in about 6 paces, my world changed. With each of the last six steps my lower jaw fell progressively further down. The view, as you may have surmised, was stunning. The epic sheer cliff dropped before me into Lake Judd (pics 1&2), one of the truly great unsung sights in Australia. Beyond there was another similar mountain called Lake Sarah-Jane. It too had a tarn and, when I later checked, there were no photos of it on the internet. Here, so close to a road, are some of the gems of Tasmania yet they're rarely visited by photographers it seems, unlike Cradle Mountain, The Walls of Jerusalem and Lake Oberon.
    I've pencilled it in for a future excursion.
    The pictures I took, of course, only give you a part of what it is like to really be there but I hope you enjoy them anyway.

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    Gordon Dam

    by iandsmith Updated Feb 7, 2008

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    The dramatic wall of Gordon Dam
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    The views here are awesome. The dam wall alone is worth the extra kilometres just to stand on it and suck your breath as you look into the chasm below.
    However, there's also the gorge and the lake that the hydro electric schemes have spawned. I have to say I found it a little depressing seeing all the forests denuded of vegetation up to the high water mark and the scars across the landscape where the power lines go but, apart from that there's this wonderful lake where trout fishermen enjoy their sport.
    During the first two years, when the trout had plenty to feed on, catches up to 19 pounds were made and several around the 15 pound mark were recorded.

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    Red Knoll Lookout

    by iandsmith Written Feb 7, 2008

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    Late afternoon sun finds a gap in the clouds
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    It's fairly easy to see how this lookout at the extremity of the Scotts Peak Dam Road got its name as you get closer. There's a band of red ore distinctly showing where the roadmakers exposed it.
    The lookout itself is the finest 360 degree lookout I've come across in Australia, with Lake Pedder on one side and the southern peaks on the other.
    The solitude of the location also adds to the allure.
    The scene, part natural, part man-made, will linger with me forever and keep drawing me back. If it wasn't for the weather (it rains 5 days out of 7), you'd expect a lot more tourists here.
    I only spent an hour or so because the wind was shaking my motorhome in a disconcerting manner but I saw enough to make me want to return.

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    The Sentinel Range

    by iandsmith Written Feb 7, 2008

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    The Sentinel Range
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    It was drizzling rain and whatever views there may have been were obscured by the forests.
    Then a gap appeared. Rock cliffs thrust themselves onto the scene like dominant overseers of the landscape. “Wow” was all I could utter before they disappeared as quickly as they had arrived.
    From another gap an even more inspiring range made its presence felt. I remember thinking that if this was all I saw I would still have gone away satisfied.
    At the highest point in the road (650 metres) you are directly below the Needles, the first cliffs I had glimpsed.
    I then drove for about 30 kilometres when suddenly the second lot of mountains were upon me, flaunting their magnificence. A pewter sky clung limpet-like to the peaks as the showers intermittently obscured the massif.
    The Precambrian quartzite remnants towered over the road, the almost bare stone ramparts wrinkled with age yet seemingly defiant of all that nature could throw at them. Yet, everywhere narrow watercourses and tumbled rocks bespoke of the dominance of time and weather.
    It’s impossible to drive past The Sentinel Range and not be moved. Personally I already had goose bumps and Lake Pedder was yet to come.

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