Legerwood Travel Guide

  • Farming memorial plaque
    Farming memorial plaque
    by tiabunna
  • Farming memorial
    Farming memorial
    by tiabunna
  • Legerwood Carved Memorial Trees
    Legerwood Carved Memorial Trees
    by tiabunna

Legerwood Things to Do

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    by tiabunna Written Jul 29, 2008

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    The sign on the ‘wishing well’ says it all. Apart from maintenance, the donations go to improving the facilities in the park. I tossed in a coin: should you be visiting, I’d suggest you also do so.

    A 'donations' well, not a wishing well!
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    • Historical Travel

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    by tiabunna Written Jul 29, 2008

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    In the park near the Memorial Trees, you will find this old plough on a plinth, erected for Australia’s Bicentenary in 1988. There also is a plaque, shown in photo 2, explaining the background. The Legerwood area remains dependent on agriculture and forestry.

    Farming memorial Farming memorial plaque
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    by tiabunna Written Jul 29, 2008

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    Should you find yourself near Legerwood (and Launceston is only an hour away), do make a detour there to walk along the avenue of Carved Memorial Trees; read the stories on the plaques; ponder.

    I don’t propose to write a tip about each carved tree – somehow that doesn’t seem appropriate. I’ve included photos of the carvings, and the associated plaques, in the Travelogue with this page: please spare a few minutes there on your own “virtual visit” to Legerwood. And ask yourself if this quiet little bush hamlet doesn’t have lessons for the world about global stupidity, courage, love and devotion.

    Main street, Legerwood Legerwood Carved Memorial Trees
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    • Historical Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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Legerwood Transportation

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    by tiabunna Written Jul 29, 2008

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    One of the soldiers lost in WW1 was the porter at the local railway station. Legerwood no longer has a railway, let alone a station with a porter: come to a point, passenger trains no longer operate anywhere in Tasmania! Now, apart from something exotic such as a helicopter, the only way to visit Legerwood is by road.

    Abandoned railway line
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    • Road Trip

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Legerwood Shopping

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    by tiabunna Written Jul 29, 2008

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    Imagine that you are carving a tree stump. You need to work on a confined elevated platform exposed to the weather. Should you remove just a little too much timber the section cannot be replaced and, unlike carving (for example) a piece of marble, it is not possible to start with a new piece of material. Now try to do that carving with a coarse instrument like a chainsaw! I use one frequently to cut wood, but I know carving would be far beyond my abilities.

    Legerwood’s superb chainsaw carvings were done by chainsaw artist Eddie Freeman, a resident of Ross. His art is his business and, who knows, if you have a large tree which is past its ‘use-by’ date, maybe you could commission him to carve it for you!

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    • Arts and Culture

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