Remine Travel Guide

  • Looking south
    Looking south
    by iandsmith
  • Remine
    by iandsmith
  • Entrance to the Trial Harbour museum
    Entrance to the Trial Harbour museum
    by iandsmith

Remine Things to Do

  • iandsmith's Profile Photo
    native pea 3 more images

    by iandsmith Written Mar 12, 2013

    As you approach Trial Harbour the vastness of the Great Southern Ocean becomes apparent as, sprawled to the south. kilometre after kilometre of sandy beach is pounded by the relentless surf.
    On high the vegetation is rarely above ankle height so it's easy to step out of your vehicle and get some shots.....so long as you can stay upright!
    Trial Harbour also has a history of whales being beached here from time to time, though it hadn't happend for a few years when I was there. You can see pictures in the History House.

    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • Whale Watching
    • Photography

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    Small waterfall sustained by the rain 4 more images

    by iandsmith Written Mar 12, 2013

    2 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There's one good reason that few people live here - the weather. Let's be totally hnest, the weather on the west coast of Tasmania is not something you look forward to on a holiday but, conversely, that's why a trickle of tourists go there, because it's remote and because it's wild. I went on a two hour walk up north and return to get these shots. Hopefully they reflect how wild and rugged Trial Harbour is.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • National/State Park
    • Beaches

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    Entrance to the museum at Trial Harbour 4 more images

    by iandsmith Written Mar 12, 2013

    Our first stop was the local history room, housed inside a house owned by the Smiths, though apparently not relatives of mine. To get there you first had to navigate the quirkiest garden either of us had ever seen, designed by necessity because wombats and wallabies eat most things you plant. Thus driftwood, broken pottery, ore stamping machines, carvings, mining relics, cacti and other indescribable items have found their way into this wonderland of human ingenuity where lawn mowers are redundant, due to the aforementioned native animal activity.
    Elaine Smith was a congenial host and there were many interesting things in the room; her husband and her had lived here for the past 17 years but had owned a holiday shack here for 35 years.
    The harbour, so called, got its name from a ship that was wrecked here, though Lorraine and I pondered as to how anyone could possibly label it a harbour yet, there on the historic wall was a photo with three ships unloading side by side on the small sandy part of the beach – amazing to say the least.
    There were stories of a lady dying during a difficult childbirth because her husband, who had gone to fetch a doctor in Zeehan, stopped at the hotel and had too many drinks; there was another where the daughter of well off Cockney hotel owners had been sent to Sydney to an aunt because of her rebellious ideas but had ended up in Zeehan due to shipwrecks and become the town’s first barmaid. When her mother found out, she caught the next available ship out only to find that Jessie, the daughter, had fallen in love with a German surveyor so mum insisted on a wedding as soon as possible but in some civilized place which turned out to be Launceston. When the first grandchild was born the German grandmother sent a present but it took 5 years to arrive and was eventually shipped on the famous Cutty Sark.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Seniors
    • Historical Travel

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