Tasmania Things to Do

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  • Things to Do
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  • Things to Do
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Most Recent Things to Do in Tasmania

  • swissfondue's Profile Photo

    Wineglass Bay - Freycinet Peninsula

    by swissfondue Updated Nov 19, 2013

    This iconic bay and world renowned beach near Coles Bay on Tassies East Coast is one of the most photographed spots in Tasmania. More than 200,000 people walk or cruise into the area each year.

    My best tip is to watch the weather conditions and try plan to do the walk or cruise on a sunny day, if you want to capture stunning photos such as the one I've shown. I have been in the area on a cloudy day and it does diminish the scenery somewhat. Keep in mind that Tasmania is known for its "4 seasons in one day" and weather forecasts can be outrageously wrong a lot of the time.

    There are no facilities in Wineglass Bay. I havent seen a toilet anywhere either but there may be a "long drop" version. Carry your own food and water. The walk will take up to one hour (with some uphill climbing/steps/boardwalks) and wouldnt be an option with mobility problems but if you are only reasonably fit then the end result (on a sunny calm day) is certainly worth it.

    It is possible to camp at Wineglass Bay but as it is in the Freycinet National Park a camping permit and fees apply. You will need to carry out your rubbish from the camping area.

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    Devils kitchen and Blowhole

    by shavy Written Jun 30, 2013
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    All are on the same place amazing the rocks has this form from water, even a stroll of just an hour or two will bring you to the edge of sheer drops overlooking charm and surging ocean off-shore islands

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    BURNIE AN UNKNOWN GEM

    by AusPinay Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    the view from the port of Burnie going Northwest
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    A major port of Tasmania, Burnie has plenty of lovely landscapes which can be viewed from various lookouts. Its natural resources are diverse with many waterfalls, cliffs, plus many sea and land attractions including fascinating wildlife and fresh produce. It has fields teeming with pyrithium plants and opium poppies, vegetable production supplying major national companies, etc.

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    BICENTENNIAL PARK in HOBART

    by AusPinay Written Dec 28, 2009

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    another good look at one part of Hobart
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    We visited this place from Mt Nelson lookout, a 10 minute drive from the city where you can find also the Signal Station. It is one of the most serene places I've been to. You leave the hustle and bustle of Hobart for a few minutes and you're rewarded with awesome views!

    The park, aside from the usual bushwalking trails around it has spectacular views of Hobart from the lookout. The bus trip here was worth it!

    The Signal station on top was one of a chain of semaphore masts that relayed messages between Hobart and Port Arthur.

    Anyway, just look at the photos!

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    VISIT DEVONPORT

    by AusPinay Written Dec 28, 2009

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    the small port of Devonport
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    Devonport is a city in the north-west of Tasmania, Australia, at the mouth of the Mersey River. Along with the slightly smaller city of Burnie, it is a major regional centre of the north-west of the state.

    To visitors to Tasmania, it is primarily known as the port for the Spirit of Tasmania ferries - Spirit I and II travel to Melbourne, Victoria.

    While situated close to the Tasmanian high country, including spectacular Cradle Mountain, Devonport is lucky to have a temperate coastal climate influenced by the ocean. This influence moderates all aspects of the climate andfound in the small range between summer and winter average temperatures there.

    Devonport is particularly blessed with lovely reserves and recreational facilities. Parkland, which has been established along the Mersey Estuary, along the whole Coastal foreshore and in the Don River valley, contains a cycling/walking track linking many of the City's recreational facilities.(source-http://www.devonporttasmania.travel/)

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    TRY TASMANIAN FISH & CHIPS at Doolicious Van

    by AusPinay Written Dec 20, 2009

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    the food van
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    At the site near Pirates Bay blowhole is a local food van called DOOLICIOUS which has fresh Tasmania fish and seafood which you can enjoy with crispy chips, plus other local delicacies like curried scallop pies, yummy iced cream like English butterscotch caramel, and other delectable tucker.

    We enjoyed ourselves especially as the fish and chips were in paper cones which were handy as we had our lunch carrying the cones as we walk to the Blowhole.

    On our way back we sampled ice cream as well which made a lot of our fellow coach passengers to get some too! The ice cream was reasonably priced too- about $3 for a scoop and $4 for double scoops anbd they were big scoops too!

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    EXPLORE DEVIL'S KITCHEN

    by AusPinay Written Dec 20, 2009

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    the amazing Devil's Kitchen from one angle
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    Walking or hiking to see Devil's Kitchen can be a rewarding experience! The ruggest Tasmanian coastline can also be enjoyed like what we did- a truly wothwhile natural place of beauty!

    The 60 metres deep natural rock formation has been created by a similar process to that which has created Tasman's Arch. Basically, if Tasman's Arch collapsed, it would lead to the creation of a landform like the Devils Kitchen.

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    EXPLORE DEVIL'S KITCHEN

    by AusPinay Written Dec 20, 2009

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    the amazing Devil's Kitchen from one angle
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    Walking or hiking to see Devil's Kitchen can be a rewarding experience! The ruggest Tasmanian coastline can also be enjoyed like what we did- a truly wothwhile natural place of beauty!

    The 60 metres deep natural rock formation has been created by a similar process to that which has created Tasman's Arch. Basically, if Tasman's Arch collapsed, it would lead to the creation of a landform like the Devils Kitchen.

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    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park

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    EAGLE HAWK NECK

    by AusPinay Written Dec 20, 2009

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    view from the coach
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    An area of immense natural beauty and diverse resources., this is worth a visit as you can find not just rock formations and wonderful coastal landscapes but also get a great glimpse of the vast TAsman Peninsual.

    The Tesselated PAvement, Devil's Kitchen, Tasman Arch,Waterfall Bay, Pirates Bay Blowhole,etc. are seen from this place alone!

    Locally known as the Neck the isthmus itself is around 400 metres long and under 30 metres wide at its narrowest point. It forms a natural gateway to the peninsula that was utilised by the British in 1830s when a line of dogs was chained to posts across the neck to warn of any convicts attempting to escape the prison at Port Arthur.

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    TASMAN NATIONAL PARK LOOKOUT

    by AusPinay Written Dec 20, 2009

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    family photo w/ gorgeous landscape as bg
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    Tasman National Park protects forest and spectacular coastline from Cape Surville to Waterfall Bay and Fortescue Bay; and from Cape Hauy to Cape Pillar and Cape Raoul. The park incorporates several off-shore islands, including Fossil Island, Hippolyte Rocks and Tasman Island. It is an area of great beauty and natural diversity, including some of the most stunning coastal scenery anywhere in Australia.

    The inspiring views- coastal landscapes, rock formations and rich flora and fauna form part of the natural wealth of TAsmania.

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    See the Tesselated Pavement, A NAtural Wonder

    by AusPinay Updated Dec 20, 2009

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    natural wonder- tesselated pavement
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    These are intertidal rock formations that developed into rock platforms as influenced by wave action on ocean shores.

    The cracks (or joints) were formed when the rock fractured through the action of stress on the Earth's crust and subsequently, were modified by sand and wave action.

    They seem to look like ordinary sized tiles forming pavements hence the name. They are best viewed from the entrance of Engale Hawk Neck near Port Arthur.

    It is a steep walk from the top of Eagle Hawk Neck to the pavements but it is worth the time and effort! It might take longer thatn 15 minutes for those who are not so mobile so beware. But with my boys, they were even racing up and down the wooden steps and rocky paths to the bottom!

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    Hiscutt Park

    by AusPinay Written Dec 16, 2009

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    the Dutch windwill at Hiscutt Park

    Hiscutt Park, with its Dutch windmill and playground, is a peaceful place for a picnic. Behind the town, Dial Range has several walking tracks to the mountain-tops with stunning views over Penguin and the north-west coast.

    A pleasant coach trip from the Port of Burnie was the best thinbg we did as we were treated to the mosrt amazing views along the northwest coasat of the Tasman Peninsula and Hiscutt Park is one of those places that can be a lovely and peaceful place for a picnic.

    Its famous landmark is the Dutch windmill donated by the Dutch community in Tasmania to show their gratitude of the rugged yet beautiful place that embraced their people and their culture.,

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    FAIRY PENGUIN TOWN

    by AusPinay Written Dec 16, 2009

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    having freshly baked Tassie meat pies and rolls
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    A charming little town, Penguin is located northwest of Tasmania in Burnie overlooking the mighty Bass Strait separating the island of Tassie from the mainland.

    According to one Tassie website, "Penguin was explored by Bass and Flinders and settled in 1861. It was named by Robert Campbell Gunn, after the small seabirds that live in rookeries along the north coast. Penguin was a originally a small timber and mining town, overshadowed by Burnie and Devonport."

    Explore the wonderful scenery of Penguin not to mention its resident penguins which can only be seen during the dark, plus its famous PENGUIN statue, reputed to be the largest in the world! The 3.15-metre (10-foot) cement and fibreglass bird was erected in 1975 to commemorate the centenary of the town.

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  • unravelau's Profile Photo

    Sail into Hobart. Tasmania

    by unravelau Updated Oct 31, 2007
    First glimpse of Hobart so long ago
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    Sailing into Hobart was such a wonderful experience for me....so wonderful that although it happened over thirty years ago, it is as fresh in my mind as if it were yesterday.

    But.........cruising is a lovely way to go anywhere don't you think?

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    Mountain Expirence

    by carmen. Written Jul 22, 2007

    When the wind blows in Tasmania it is bitterly cold on a winters day.

    Mt. Wellington is the highest peak at 1271m above the city and 21km drive up the mountian is worth the trip. It takes you to the glacial rock formation at the summit.
    At The Pinnacle, you can see out across Hobart and the bay, Bruny Island and the Tasman Peninsula.
    Entry is free and the viewing platform is always open, while the obsrvation shelter is open from 8 - 8p.m in summer (Best time - you can spend more time up there) and from 8 -4p.m in winter (too cold - it will be a quick visit)

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Tasmania Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Tasmania things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Tasmania sightseeing.

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