Tasmania Things to Do

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Most Recent Things to Do in Tasmania

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    Queenstown West Coast Wilderness Railway

    by shavy Written Oct 26, 2014

    A unique experience to take a journey with the steam train along the old mining railway which ends in Strahan.

    The wilderness railway is one of the most visited in Queenstown. Abt railway loco no 1 and its three car train is one you can take for a ride.

    Is a 35 kilometer long railway operating on a rack which allows it to climb 200 meters almost vertically in parts, which runs from Queenstown to Strahan.

    The railway uses the fully restored 100 year old steam locomotive that ran on the original rail line built for the Mt Lyell Mining & Railway Company

    Inside the large railway shed
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    Queenstown west coast Tasmania

    by shavy Written Oct 26, 2014

    Another lovely town to stop by. A town with a history long tied to the mining industry. Queenstown is not only a mining town, tourism is coming alive here in a town where one can travel back through time

    Today Queenstown is a significant tourist town, which attracts plenty of tourists. One can do a few interesting sights in the area such as: fishing, hiking, mountain biking and so on. There are always a lot of things to do without brings you to bored

    Queenstown has retained many of the old buildings to give the town a wild west feeling to it. The town has many old buildings and a unique atmosphere that only an old continuously operating, mining town can give

    Queenstown Streetscape Former Hunters Hotel
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    • Historical Travel
    • Cycling
    • Family Travel

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    Derby old mining town

    by shavy Updated Oct 26, 2014

    This town had mined tin for a number of years. Derby itself was in a narrow valley and had been nearly wiped out by floods in the past. Now a pretty quiet town. The town retains the atmosphere of its pioneering history and is a classified historic town

    The Derby Bank House Craft & Gift Shop occupies the original Heritage listed National Bank of Tasmania built in 1888 and offers locally made crafts and gifts, most made on the premises. The big painted rock is viewable on the way to town

    Now Bank House Manor Cottage Crafts Fish Rock
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    Bicheno Blowhole, Blowing

    by shavy Written Oct 26, 2014

    On our way to St Helens Point, we have a quick stop on the coast of Bicheno is somehow a blow hole.
    The blowhole is one of the attractions of the quiet fishing town Bicheno north of Freycinet Peninsula on the east coast of Tasmania.

    The blowhole blows regularly, even in relatively calm weather. In really rough storms with high tides, the waves can crash over the top of the blowhole. But we didn't see any blowing during our visit, so, we thought we don't wait. I'm just wonder why the rocks are in red

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    • Water Sports
    • Beaches
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    Sheffield a town of murals

    by shavy Written Oct 25, 2014

    A very short drive from Devonport this place Sheffield is worth to stop. Sheffield has made itself into the town of murals and now has 55 murals decorating the town.

    Everywhere in the city you'll find one. A city filled with murals depicting the history of the city, events, heroes of the city and already more than two thousand pictures of a broken heart.

    Every year during the Mural Fest nine street must be equipped with the walls of new drawings. The first mural was painted in 1986 by an artist named John Lendis, and more than 30 have been added since then.

    The post office
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    • Architecture

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    One of the many falls

    by shavy Written Oct 25, 2014

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    Waterfalls, pristine nature you can find it all in Tasmania. This is one of the waterfalls in the island, if you have a car you can easily visited most of the falls

    Going to the falls is really a nice walk. You hike through a beautiful nature a real oasis. The falls is a bit far from the car park. The footpath to the falls are easy walk where there were some places a walking board.

    Walking through green environment where you met some of flowing dike, green trees and many fern plants. This waterfalls itself is not very impressive, this is small but the main plus of the place is the surrounding

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    • Theme Park Trips

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    Devils Kitchen

    by shavy Updated Oct 25, 2014

    This is impressive the Devil's Kitchen, you'll find this site in the same location of Tasmanian Arch. The whole place is walkable to each other

    I haven't gone too far that day I was so sick, high fever and the heat is unbearable. But still admire this beautiful rock formation

    Just down the road from the Tasman Arch is yet another piece of evidence of the sea pounding against the coast.

    From the car park there is a look out, step up to the railing and you’ll be blown away by what you see. You can walk around where there were lookout, it will about 4 km return

    Nice rock formation
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    National park

    by shavy Updated Oct 23, 2014

    This is one of the natural attractions the rock formations are beautiful with lovely colors and huge vertical cliffs. The scenery was spectacular along the stretch of coast that contains the, Tasman Blowhole

    Along the way we have come along Paterson's Arch. Can visited in the same time, amazing how the water done a rock carving. A stroll of an hour or two will bring you to the edge of sheer drops overlooking charm and surging ocean offshore islands

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    • Historical Travel
    • Archeology

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    Wineglass Bay - Freycinet Peninsula

    by swissfondue Updated Nov 19, 2013

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    This iconic bay and world renowned beach near Coles Bay on Tassies East Coast is one of the most photographed spots in Tasmania. More than 200,000 people walk or cruise into the area each year.

    My best tip is to watch the weather conditions and try plan to do the walk or cruise on a sunny day, if you want to capture stunning photos such as the one I've shown. I have been in the area on a cloudy day and it does diminish the scenery somewhat. Keep in mind that Tasmania is known for its "4 seasons in one day" and weather forecasts can be outrageously wrong a lot of the time.

    There are no facilities in Wineglass Bay. I havent seen a toilet anywhere either but there may be a "long drop" version. Carry your own food and water. The walk will take up to one hour (with some uphill climbing/steps/boardwalks) and wouldnt be an option with mobility problems but if you are only reasonably fit then the end result (on a sunny calm day) is certainly worth it.

    It is possible to camp at Wineglass Bay but as it is in the Freycinet National Park a camping permit and fees apply. You will need to carry out your rubbish from the camping area.

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    BURNIE AN UNKNOWN GEM

    by AusPinay Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    A major port of Tasmania, Burnie has plenty of lovely landscapes which can be viewed from various lookouts. Its natural resources are diverse with many waterfalls, cliffs, plus many sea and land attractions including fascinating wildlife and fresh produce. It has fields teeming with pyrithium plants and opium poppies, vegetable production supplying major national companies, etc.

    the view from the port of Burnie going Northwest near Penguin, a town near Burnie greenhouses for cut flowers
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    • Cruise
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    BICENTENNIAL PARK in HOBART

    by AusPinay Written Dec 28, 2009

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    We visited this place from Mt Nelson lookout, a 10 minute drive from the city where you can find also the Signal Station. It is one of the most serene places I've been to. You leave the hustle and bustle of Hobart for a few minutes and you're rewarded with awesome views!

    The park, aside from the usual bushwalking trails around it has spectacular views of Hobart from the lookout. The bus trip here was worth it!

    The Signal station on top was one of a chain of semaphore masts that relayed messages between Hobart and Port Arthur.

    Anyway, just look at the photos!

    another good look at one part of Hobart park info here boys enjoying the park awesome view walking around teh awesome park
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    • Photography
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    VISIT DEVONPORT

    by AusPinay Written Dec 28, 2009

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    Devonport is a city in the north-west of Tasmania, Australia, at the mouth of the Mersey River. Along with the slightly smaller city of Burnie, it is a major regional centre of the north-west of the state.

    To visitors to Tasmania, it is primarily known as the port for the Spirit of Tasmania ferries - Spirit I and II travel to Melbourne, Victoria.

    While situated close to the Tasmanian high country, including spectacular Cradle Mountain, Devonport is lucky to have a temperate coastal climate influenced by the ocean. This influence moderates all aspects of the climate andfound in the small range between summer and winter average temperatures there.

    Devonport is particularly blessed with lovely reserves and recreational facilities. Parkland, which has been established along the Mersey Estuary, along the whole Coastal foreshore and in the Don River valley, contains a cycling/walking track linking many of the City's recreational facilities.(source-http://www.devonporttasmania.travel/)

    the small port of Devonport Devonport n ear theMErsey estuary The Mersey Bluff lighthous is found in Devonport
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    TRY TASMANIAN FISH & CHIPS at Doolicious Van

    by AusPinay Written Dec 20, 2009

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    At the site near Pirates Bay blowhole is a local food van called DOOLICIOUS which has fresh Tasmania fish and seafood which you can enjoy with crispy chips, plus other local delicacies like curried scallop pies, yummy iced cream like English butterscotch caramel, and other delectable tucker.

    We enjoyed ourselves especially as the fish and chips were in paper cones which were handy as we had our lunch carrying the cones as we walk to the Blowhole.

    On our way back we sampled ice cream as well which made a lot of our fellow coach passengers to get some too! The ice cream was reasonably priced too- about $3 for a scoop and $4 for double scoops anbd they were big scoops too!

    the food van Tassie fish & chips
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    EXPLORE DEVIL'S KITCHEN

    by AusPinay Written Dec 20, 2009

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    Walking or hiking to see Devil's Kitchen can be a rewarding experience! The ruggest Tasmanian coastline can also be enjoyed like what we did- a truly wothwhile natural place of beauty!

    The 60 metres deep natural rock formation has been created by a similar process to that which has created Tasman's Arch. Basically, if Tasman's Arch collapsed, it would lead to the creation of a landform like the Devils Kitchen.

    the amazing Devil's Kitchen from one angle
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    • National/State Park
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    EXPLORE DEVIL'S KITCHEN

    by AusPinay Written Dec 20, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Walking or hiking to see Devil's Kitchen can be a rewarding experience! The ruggest Tasmanian coastline can also be enjoyed like what we did- a truly wothwhile natural place of beauty!

    The 60 metres deep natural rock formation has been created by a similar process to that which has created Tasman's Arch. Basically, if Tasman's Arch collapsed, it would lead to the creation of a landform like the Devils Kitchen.

    the amazing Devil's Kitchen from one angle
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

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Tasmania Things to Do

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