Lorne Off The Beaten Path

  • I feel so small!
    I feel so small!
    by eviltooth
  • Erskine River
    Erskine River
    by eviltooth
  • Sheoak Falls
    Sheoak Falls
    by eviltooth

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Lorne

  • leffe3's Profile Photo

    Erskine Falls

    by leffe3 Updated Sep 26, 2005

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    3 more images

    About 6 kms inland from Lorne is Erskine Falls - part of Angahook-Lorne State Park. Deep in the rainforests, a steep descent from the car park to the pool at the bottom of the falls (although it is 'stepped' for easier descent) leads to a number of paths along the banks of the creek as well as into the forest itself (note that a sign at the pool indicates that the path along the stream is for experienced hikers only). There are also display boards around the car park of photos of 19th 'ladies and gentlemen' in all their Sunday finest at the Falls. Quite an achievement!

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • ATXtraveler's Profile Photo

    Aireys Inlet Split Point Lighthouse

    by ATXtraveler Written Sep 10, 2005

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    As we ventured off from Bell's Beach and its great waves, headed toward Lorne, we came across a great lighthouse, located at the eastern side of the "Shipwreck Coast" in a small town called Aireys Inlet. Split Point Lighthouse served a very important function, as a navigation point between Cape Otway and Port Phillip Bay on Victoria's South Coast.

    The lighthouse has been in operation since 1891, and the lighthouse property also contains a nice little 10 minute walk that gives some great views of the coastline and Eagle Rock, one of Aireys Inlets oldest residents.

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • eviltooth's Profile Photo

    Swallow Cave

    by eviltooth Written Oct 11, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Swallow Cave

    A large cave overhang across the river, where the Welcome Swallows nest in rock crevices in spring.

    The Welcome Swallow is metallic blue-black above, light grey below on the breast and belly, and rust on the forehead, throat and upper breast. It has a long forked tail, with a row of white spots on the individual feathers.

    Unfortunately, it was winter when we visited and didn't see any swallow.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • eviltooth's Profile Photo

    Castle Rocks

    by eviltooth Written Oct 11, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Castle Rocks

    Further down the track from Sheoak Falls lead you to Castle Rocks, about 2 and 1/2 hrs return from Sheoak Picnic Area. If you are adventurous enough, climb over the platform and walk over the rocks to Swallow Cave. Would have done that if Ewa didn't start feeling unwell and went back to the picnic area.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • eviltooth's Profile Photo

    Sheoak Falls

    by eviltooth Written Oct 11, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sheoak Falls

    Another beautiful waterfall in Anglehook-Lorne State Park, only a short trek from the Great Ocean Road. The walk takes about 2 hours return and longer if you go all the way to Swallow Cave. The terrain can get steep at times but very rewarding, so get out of your car and enjoy the nature!

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • eviltooth's Profile Photo

    Erskine River

    by eviltooth Written Oct 11, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Erskine River

    While the water level of the river may drop in summer there is usually enough water to form the characteristic thin ribbon all year round. Well made steps lead down from the carpark to the river and this is oddly as far as most people walk with only a relative few setting off to explore around the bottom of the waterfall.

    Pic shows where pioneers for the last 110 years have viewed the falls, risking life and limb by scrambling over treacherously slippery rocks.

    Related to:
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

  • eviltooth's Profile Photo

    Erskine Falls

    by eviltooth Updated Oct 11, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Erskine Fall

    This is one of the many waterfalls around Lorne in the Anglehook-Lorne State Park. Probably one of the most popular falls along the Great Ocean Road, Erskine is only 9km drive from Lorne with a short walk down the steps to base of falls. At the base of the steps is a new sign: "No walking beyond this point. Slippery rocks ahead."... yeah right!. The original track was made in 1890 and for 110 years people have been slipping and sliding their way to the base of the falls. And if you think that's too difficult for your average tourist, try walking in to the base of Carrisbrook Falls.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • eviltooth's Profile Photo

    Angahook-Lorne State Park

    by eviltooth Written Feb 25, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I feel so small!

    Don't miss this lovely park! It's along the Great Ocean Road. Love the Erskine Fall and the creek. It was a bit too cold when I was there in winter but I'm sure it's lovely in summer. :)

    Angahook-Lorne State Park, comprising 22,000 hectares, takes in the steep timbered ridges of the eastern Otways, fern gullies, waterfalls, and a coast with tall cliffs, coves and sandy beaches. The northern area around Aireys Inlet is drier and has heathlands of great floral diversity.
    The Great Ocean Road passes through the park. There were eight shipwrecks off the coast. W.B. Godfrey is the most recognisable with a grave site, and artefacts visible in the rock shelf at low tide. Some walking tracks behind Lorne follow old tramlines used by early timber mills.

    Things to do

    1) Bushwalking! What else? :)

    2) Beaches at Fairhaven, Lorne, Wye River and Kennett River are patrolled in summer. Go surfing along the open stretch near Fairhaven and the northern end of Lorne beach.

    3) Rock platforms are ideal for fishing.

    4) Horse riding tours are available in the eastern end of the park

    Facilities

    1) Car-based bush camping is available at Hammonds Road in the north and Allenvale Mill site, Sharps Track, Jamieson Track and Wye River Road in the south.

    2) There is also an overnight camp on the Cora Lynn Track for bushwalker.

    3) There are also five picnic areas.

    4) You can find the commercial caravan parks and camping grounds at Aireys Inlet, Anglesea, Lorne, Wye River and Kennett River.

    Fauna

    There are 18 threatened species in the park, including the Spot-tailed Quoll, Hooded Plover and Rufous Bristlebird. Try spotting them! :)

    Precautions

    1) Be careful when fishing from rock platforms because of big waves and incoming tides.

    2) Always stay on designated walking tracks!

    How to Get There

    Access is via the Great Ocean Road, Deans Marsh-Lorne Road, Bambra Road or Erskine Road (Melway ref: 511 B11, C10).

    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Lorne

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

104 travelers online now

Comments

Lorne Off The Beaten Path

Reviews and photos of Lorne off the beaten path posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Lorne sightseeing.

View all Lorne hotels