Melbourne Local Customs

  • The Yellow Peril
    The Yellow Peril
    by Intrepidduck
  • Local Customs
    by cjg1
  • Local Customs
    by cochinjew

Best Rated Local Customs in Melbourne

  • l_joo's Profile Photo

    God believing custom tip

    by l_joo Written Jan 12, 2006

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    If you are interested in God believing activities, I suggest you a good church (St Patrick if not mistaken) which myself spent some 2 hours sitting inside (on long bench) listening to the singing and talking by God-believers for the first time in my life, quite enjoying actually, but later it was not that enjoying when some tour operators brought groups of tourists to inside the church with cameras shooting like a zoo with non-stop flashes, they were probably tourists who never in their life heard about church. I snapped more than 50 photos but don't want to bore you, just one as VT-tip.

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  • Meat Pies

    by grkboiler Written Jan 29, 2004

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    Meat pies are very popular at sporting events, or for a quick snack from a 7-11. If you have a pie and you like it, you will want one every day. This is definitely one of the things I miss most about Melbourne and Australia. I loved sitting at the MCG and watching footy while having a pie.

    Pies usually come wrapped individually in plastic. If you get a meat pie at a game, you can eat it plain or with tomato sauce (ketchup).

    In Australia, by the way, it is to-MAH-toe, not to-MAY-toe.

    Back to the pies...It may sound simple and you might wonder why I put this tip here, but I have heard a few tourists ask "how do you eat this thing?".

    My Aussie friend would show them to eat a pie like this: Open up the plastic and add tomato sauce with every bite. Another way is to take the pie out of the package, smother the tomato sauce on top and eat it. No utensils necessary, just your hands. Just be careful - the filling can burn your mouth.

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  • Some food tips...

    by grkboiler Written Feb 5, 2004

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    Hungry Jack's

    When you hear someone say "Macca's", they are talking about McDonald's.

    If Hungry Jack's looks similar to Burger King, its because it IS Burger King.

    Say you are in a restaurant and you want to order a sandwich with everything on it - you will order it "with the lot". As in "souvlaki with the lot".

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  • Intrepidduck's Profile Photo

    Melbourne: Architectural Vernacular Pt 1

    by Intrepidduck Updated Feb 2, 2006

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    St Augustines Catholic Church

    Melbourne has a rich and many varied architectural legacy for a city established only 170 years ago. After the arrival of Batman - that's John Batman. The first European structures were made from bark and earth over a tea tree framework. However basalt rock - fashioned into bluestone became the building material of choice for the early settlement's substancial buildings. The importation of prefabricated houses was also incorperated, which includes the still standing Governor Latrobe's Cottage. However it was with the most enduring buildings of the colonial period where bluestone was used. The oldest existing being the c1842 St James Anglican Church on King Street, West Melbourne, it actually in it's second location from where it was removed from the once Batman's Hill. Interestingly Batman's Hill was also removed in excavations for the former Spencer Street Railway Station.

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    Melbourne: Arts and Culture Pt 3

    by Intrepidduck Updated Feb 2, 2006

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    The Yellow Peril

    Artists have always contributed to controversy - sometimes their doings have not even been intentional. In the late 1970s the Melbourne City Council installed a new piece of steel sculpture titled Vault (aka Yellow Peril) on the completed City Square. To many people in conservative and influencial circles this work of art was an out rage. It remained for a couple of years on site and then after so much huha was removed, placed in storage and at a later date relocated to the banks of the Yarra. Then in the late 1990s with the construction of the Crown Casino - also a monument of controversy - the so called Yellow Peril was in peril once more! Recently "Vault" has been hushed away to it's third site, away from the eyes of many. It rests I would say peacefully at last next to ACCA in Grant Street Sth Melbourne.

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  • Melbourne is just like _____

    by grkboiler Written Feb 5, 2004

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    When you are in a foreign city, it is human nature to try to find similarities with your own home because it makes you feel more comfortable in that new city.

    I was with a group of people one night, mixed with Aussies and Americans. When asked how they liked Melbourne, one of the Americans said "Its great - Melbourne is just like an American city." I heard this answer many times while I was there.

    Wrong answer. Nearly every time an American would say this, the Australian would rightfully get defensive and they would usually say something very similar:
    "Melbourne is NOTHING like America - we don't have your levels of crime and poverty and we have better morals. We don't want to our city to be anything like yours." Criticism of Jerry Springer would usually follow, which was always very funny.

    Melbourne is a unique city and its people have every reason to be very proud of it. It does not take long to understand this. If you are American, as innocent as you may think you sound, it is not a complement to say "Melbourne is just like an American city".

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    Enjoy a Lamington

    by cjg1 Updated May 20, 2013

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    My wife and I first discovered Lamingtons in 2009. Lamingtons are little sponge cakes coated in chocolate and topped in shredded coconut. We have found Lamingtons in every bakery since it is such a popular Australian treat. I actually like them but my wife is not a fan of coconut.

    During our visist to Melbourne we picked up a rather large Lamington at the Queen Victoria Markets for our friend's daughter at home. We always bring Laurel back something either candy or treat that is specific to that country/locale. With careful packing we delivered Laurel her Laminton intact and she loved it. Now she's working on getting a good recipe to make her own.

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    Tour Guide.

    by AndreaPrice Written Nov 7, 2005

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    It is a local custom to contact me when you are in melbourne and say hi. I am always up for meeting new people from all walks of life and I will be the best Travel agent in town. It is also a custom to pay me generously!! Just joking but love to hear from any visitors.

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  • International Comedy Festival

    by grkboiler Written Dec 2, 2004

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    If you are in Melbourne from the end of March through April, check out the Melbourne International Comedy Festival. It is the 3rd largest comedy festival in the world and events for the festival happen at pubs, clubs, and theatres throughout the city. The best comics in Australia and in the world perform in what is the biggest cultural event in all of Australia. It isn't just stand-ups, but street performers, theatre, TV, radio, and music.

    Check the website and join the mailing list for upcoming events and ticket prices.

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  • Antipodes Festival

    by grkboiler Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Bad picture of the Antipodes Festival

    Melbourne has the largest Greek population in the world outside of Greece and is the 3rd largest Greek-speaking city in the world. The Greek community holds an annual festival from March to April called the Antipodes Festival. The major highlight of this festival is the two-day Greek Glendi held on Lonsdale Street near the end of March on a Saturday and Sunday around March 25th for Greek Independence Day. This is the largest ethnic festival in Australia and the largest Greek festival in the world.

    You will find tents set up for food, shopping, arts, sports, and religion. There is a stage set up at the corner of Russell and Lonsdale set up for Greek dance troupes to perform, and a live Greek band will also be on hand. You can also stop inside one of the many stores or restaurants on Lonsdale Street. This festival attracts thousands of people each year.

    Just in case the official website has old material, here is another one...
    http://www.visitvictoria.com/displayObject.cfm/objectid.000E206A-78A8-1A0B-9AB580CF8F3C0000/vvt.vhtml

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    They rule football

    by happy_journey Written Jun 22, 2008

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    In recent years, the city has claimed the SportsBusiness title "World's Ultimate Sports City".[35].

    The city is home to the National Sports Museum, which until 2006 was located outside the members pavilion at the Melbourne Cricket Ground and reopened in 2008 in the Great Northern Stand

    Melbourne is considered the spiritual home of Australian cricket and Australian rules football - the most popular sports in Australia.

    The Australian Football League is headquartered at the Telstra Dome and ten of its teams are based in the Melbourne metropolitan area and collectively average over 35,000 spectators to each game.

    The first ever official cricket Test match in Australia was played at the Melbourne Cricket Ground in March 1877. The city is also home to a Rugby League and Soccer team; the Melbourne Storm, who play in the NRL competition, Melbourne Victory who play in the A-league, netball team Melbourne Vixens who play in the trans-Tasman trophy ANZ Championship and basketball team Melbourne Tigers who play in the National Basketball League.

    Annually, the city hosts the AFL Grand Final, as well as the international sporting events of the Australian Open tennis, Melbourne Cup and the Australian Grand Prix. In 2008 Melbourne's Telstra Dome will play host to the Australia versus England match at the 2008 Rugby League World Cup.

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    Melbourne: Architectural Vernacular Pt 3

    by Intrepidduck Updated Feb 2, 2006

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    505 Bourke St. and AMP reflection

    Melbourne doesn't just have a legacy of old 19th century buildings. There are a number of modern high rises of note for their architectural value. In 1955 curtain wall building - ICI House, at 21 levels began the movement of modern high rise development when the c1888 150 foot hight limit was amended.

    The 42 level, former BHP Headquarters at 505 Bourke Street (c1970) was a downscaled replica of another Chicago ikon - the John Hancock Building. It was also one
    of the few multi-level buildings constructed with a supporting steel skeleton rather than the typical Australian building method of the concrete core.

    Across the road can be found the 25 level AMP Building, another heritage listed multilevel building from the 1960s. As late as the late 1980s there were by appointment tours to it's roof top, a hang over from when it was the tallest building in Melbourne.

    The erection of the 88 level Eureka Apartments on Southbank is a bit of a breakthrough where the tallest inhabitable building in Melbourne has been outside the CUB zone with exception to the ICI House. Melbournians have become so parse about tall buildings now after decades of dissapointments - this one has become no exception to this.

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    Melbourne: Arts and Culture Pt 1

    by Intrepidduck Updated Feb 2, 2006

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    Australian Centre for Contemporary Art

    Melbourne has several hundred private and public art galleries and spaces located mostly through out the inner city area. The largest collection of international art is at the NGV (National Gallery of Victoria) which contains the Ian Potter Centre, located also in a number of spaces such as at Federation Square. Some of Melbourne's other major public art spaces include ACCA (Australian Centre for Contemporary Art), Heide Museum of Modern Art, and 200 Gertrude Street.

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    Melbourne: Arts and Culture Pt 2

    by Intrepidduck Updated Feb 2, 2006

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    The NGV Water Wall

    The NGV (National Gallery of Victoria) is another Melbourne ikon and institution supported and loved by Melbournians as much as AFL football or the Melbourne Cup. It was designed by the late Roy Grounds and completed in 1968, while recently under went major renovations. The NGV houses the largest collection of international art in Melbourne. The building in it's self is a monumental work of art - the entrance Water Wall the key show piece, as well as Leonard French's stained glass ceiling in the Great Hall.

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    Melbourne: Architectural Vernacular Pt 2

    by Intrepidduck Updated Feb 2, 2006

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    The City of Melbourne Building

    The City of Melbourne Building is at times seeming like a ship in the night, none the less a majestic jesture of the late 19th Century in all it's wealth and slendour as was then Marvellous Melbourne. This building has intrigued many people in Melbourne. I don't know for sure who was the architech behind this masterpiece of flamboyance, but would not be surprised if it was the architect by the name of Beswicke. I have no doudt that he must have been one of this city's most ambitious architects of the late 19th Century. However there is little information about his architectural firm or himself for that matter.

    The City of Melbourne Building stands at the SE corner of Elizabeth and Little Collins Streets.

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Melbourne Local Customs

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