Melbourne Off The Beaten Path

  • Golden Beach, Gippsland
    Golden Beach, Gippsland
    by antistar
  • Lake Guthridge, Sale, Gippsland
    Lake Guthridge, Sale, Gippsland
    by antistar
  • Wilson's Promontory, Gippsland
    Wilson's Promontory, Gippsland
    by antistar

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Melbourne

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    Victorian Alps

    by antistar Written May 4, 2015

    Far West of Melbourne you can discover the Victorian Alps, the southern edge of the Great Divide as it turns a corner at the bottom of the continent. The Victorian Alps are made up of rugged steppes, snowy peaks and high plains, popular with hikers, skiers and off-roaders respectively. It's a beautiful and desolate area to wander or drive through, often with only one road in and out of any of the remote communities (many with histories dating back to the Victorian Gold Rush).

    Some places of note include the Snowy River National Park (famous for the movie The Man from Snowy River), Dargo and Walhalla.

    Victorian Alps Victorian Alps Victorian Alps Victorian Alps Victorian Alps

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    Lakes Entrance

    by antistar Written May 3, 2015

    From the calm waters of its lakes to the thrashing waves of the open ocean on its beaches, Lakes Entrance has a lot to offer any fan of water. It's a beautiful spot, perhaps even unique - a bar of sand and waves, behind which lies the sparkling waters of the lakes stretching east and west. The land rises up quickly behind the small town, offering breathtaking views of it all.

    Lakes Entrance is a small, remote resort that's only really accessible by car, but it has all the modern facilities, even a McDonald's and a fun fair - kids will love it.

    Lakes Entrance, Victoria Lakes Entrance, Victoria Lakes Entrance, Victoria Lakes Entrance, Victoria Lakes Entrance, Victoria, 1989

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    Gippsland

    by antistar Written May 3, 2015

    To the east of Melbourne is a great swathe of farmland which feels more typical of Europe than this antipodean continent. The population is sparse and settled along the Princes Highway which stretches from Melbourne down to the coast at Lakes Entrance, a popular beach resort a few hours from the city. Outside the population centres its a varied landscape, from the wild natural park of Wilson's Promontory on the south coast, to the Victorian Alps in the north. There's plenty to see, but it can take a lot of time moving from one place to the next.

    Golden Beach, Gippsland Lake Guthridge, Sale, Gippsland Lake Reeve, Gippsland Victorian Alps, Gippsland Wilson's Promontory, Gippsland

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    Melbourne's Pink Lake

    by Orchid Written Mar 14, 2014

    Beside the city side incline of Westgate Bridge in Port Melbourne is Westgate Park, where one can find an urban example of the unusual 'pink lake'. Westgate Park is a haven for wildlife jammed into a largely industrial wasteland near one of Melbourne's container unloading ports at Webb Dock. The park has a network of bicycle and walking paths, and is one of the access routes to the Yarra Punt, which takes bicycles (and pedestrians) across the river beneath the bridge.

    The park contains two lakes, one salty, and the other freshwater. It is the salt lake that, each summer takes on a brilliant pink colour as increasing salinity due to evaporation and lack of rainfall promotes the growth of halophile archea. This ancient organism is what makes flamingos turn pink! Another less pleasant effect of the colour change is the smell of sulphurous gases!

    Here's an article about pink lakes around the world

    Car access from Todd Road, Port Melbourne, or by public transport, Bus No 232 from Altona to Victoria Market

    Westgate Bridge Wildlife in the pink Does not result from purple rain No it isn't industrial waste
    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Birdwatching
    • Cycling

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    Scrap Metal Dragons

    by Orchid Updated Mar 13, 2014

    Melbourne has a collection of oddball and underappreciated public art. Usually, anything that is a little unusual, or modern is targeted for mock outrage by one of Rupert's local rags.

    This particular sculpture is created by a private company, and shows a novel use of their product - recycled steel, often from the car we once drove.

    Two rust red scrap metal dragons, created from the output of the massive metal shredders stand guard atop a shipping container at the site entrance, on Dohertys Road in Laverton North.

    It is only a short detour off the freeway on the road to Geelong, and well worth a short gander.

    Rampant Rust Gossamer steel wings
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Photography
    • Arts and Culture

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    The Dandenong Ranges

    by etfromnc Written Dec 18, 2013

    There is so much to do in Melbourne that many people never consider anything except the beaches, the shopping, and the night life. If that is the case, you have missed much of the beauty of Victoria.
    Aussie autumn doesn’t kick off in earnest until March, and while you wouldn’t usually associate the land of beaches, surfing, and summer heat with glorious autumnal colour, the Dandenong Ranges near Melbourne will not disappoint you in a quest for color if you are fortunate enough to be there in autumn. In addition to being a national park of breathtaking beauty, the area is also dotted with manicured gardens. The Alfred Nicholas Memorial Gardens (parkweb.vic.gov.au/alfred-nicholas) are definitely worth a visit when their lawns are carpeted with fallen leaves and their trees are aglow.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel
    • National/State Park

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    Drive the Great Ocean Road

    by cjg1 Updated Aug 7, 2013

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    Getting out on the Great Ocean Road and exploring was a highlight to our 2013 trip. Stopping in the small towns, enjoying the look out points and attractions was absolutely amazing. We say such incredible sights, met some great locals and saw such amazing things. It was a experience that we both found awe inspiring and would love to do it again.

    I think that anyone visiting Melbourne should make this trip to see The Twelve Apostles and the other incredible coastal formations along the GOR. I am so thankful that my wife planned this out and had us go; I'll never forget our adventures.

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    Williamstown

    by IreneMcKay Written Jul 15, 2013

    Williamstown is situated at the mouth of the Yarra River where it enters Hobsons Bay and Port Phillip. Williamstown was Melbourne's first sea port.

    We walked along the Point Gellibrand Coastal Heritage Park which contains the old Fort Gellibrand military site dating from 1860 and the Timeball Tower which was used by ships for timekeeping and navigation.

    We enjoyed watching pelicans swimming in the bay and had a look at the Titanic Theatre Restaurant which is shaped like the famous ship.

    Williamstown. Williamstown.
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Photography
    • Beaches

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    William Ricketts Sanctuary

    by Pomocub Written Dec 9, 2012

    William Ricketts Sanctuary is a beautiful, peaceful and tranquill garden hidden in the Dandenongs. The Sanctuary was created by William Ricketts who was a sculpture and artist who carved the most beautiful sculptures out of wood and trees, Ricketts lived there until his death in 1993 and the sanctuary is now owned by Victorian Government.

    Ricketts had a connection with Aboriginal spiritual world and most of his work reflects this. Not only are you walking though lush green forest but you are walking a story trail of the Native Australian Aboriginal.

    The Sanctuary is almost like a small forest, trees are everywhere. I recommend that if you visit the sanctuary that you wear sensible footwear as the ground can sometimes get a little slippery if it is wet. There is a small cave area where you can watch a video and learn about Mr Ricketts himself and how he completed his work.

    The Sanctuary is open all year around apart from Christmas day but it may shut if there are bad weather conditions.

    Address: 1402-1404 Mount Dandenong Tourist Road, Mount Dandenong VIC 3767, Australia

    Aboriginal Children Sculpture
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Seniors
    • Arts and Culture

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    Lysterfield Park

    by leffe3 Written Feb 15, 2012

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    An off-the-beaten-track tip within Melbourne itself - Lysterfield Park is to be found on the eastern periphery of the city.

    It's a place of bush walks and mountain bike tracks, horse riding, picnics by the lake and lots of water activities, including boating and swimming from protected sandy beaches in the middle of the bush.

    It's not a spectacular 'must see' but certainly worthwhile checking it out if int he Belgrave/Puffing Billy area. And it's a great place to spot kangaroos.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Family Travel

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    Yarra Valley

    by leffe3 Updated Feb 12, 2012

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    An hour's drive from Melbourne is the Yarra Valley, famed for its vineyards and superb wines. Day trips can be organised from the city to take you out to the many of the best vineyards and to give you a real taste (literally and metaphorically!) of the wine growing area and regional Victoria.

    As well as the vineyards, there's TarraWarra Museum of Art (wonderful cafe and vineyard too!), the township of Healesville (famous for its animal sanctuary and state park).

    (These pictures are there to also point out that Australia is not all about red dust and perpetual sunshine!).

    (See also State of Victoria pages)

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Museum Visits
    • Wine Tasting

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    Avenue Of Honour

    by iandsmith Written Nov 12, 2011

    The Avenue of Honour is a part of the Maribyrnong River Trail and represents an era when values and beliefs were different to what they are today and, as such, makes for a fascinating historic record of times past. Old people such as myself will find the interpretive signs of much interest. The young will mostly pass on, disinterested by such a topic.
    The avenue came about because of the Essendon League, a group of civic minded citizens who decided to plant a row of 12 cypress trees, part of their riverside beautification scheme, and name them after British Naval ships of WWI, nine of which were sunk in the Battle of Jutland.
    The original plan to commemorate the locals who had fallen in battle became superflous when local council decided to have a Soldiers' Avenue in a different part of the city.
    The original trees are no longer there though their stumps house the explanatory signs. Kauri trees, that last much longer, have replaced them.

    The sign Maribyrnong River beside the walk
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

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    The Maribyrnong River Trail

    by iandsmith Written Nov 12, 2011

    This 4 km loop walk is certainly not "Off The Beaten Path" for Melbournians but is included here because very few tourists will have done it and that's a bit of a shame for a few reasons, not the least being because it's a nice thing to do and you can get exercise doing it. If you can find Raleigh Road Bridge or Chifley Drive you'll be in the right area of Maribyrnong.
    If you're in the CBD take the 57 tram out of Elizabeth Street and alight at stop 41 and you're there.
    All along this short walk there are interpretive signs with lots of interesting information, the most dramatic being a record of the flood levels over the years.

    Explanatory map Afton Street Footbridge
    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Fishing
    • Family Travel

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    'Rhythm of Africa' in Australia

    by HarShe Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    This is a yearly summer event at Werribee Zoo, near Melbourne. Every Sat and Sun evening from early Jan to early March. Includes wild life safari at the open zoo, African food and African music & dances. See details at their website

    Related to:
    • Music
    • Zoo

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    St.Patrick's Cathedral

    by xuessium Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    My travelling mate happened to be a devout Christian (though not a Catholic), so a visit to a cathedral was on the card. Anyway, we were in Fitzroy Gardens, so a visit to St.Patrick's Cathedral wasn't a task that was out of the way.

    St.Patrick's Cathedral, Melbourne, is the cathedral church of the Catholic Archdiocese of Melbourne and the seat of the Catholic Archbishop of Melbourne. It is known internationally as a leading example of the Gothic Revival style of architecture.

    Plans for the cathedral started in 1847, the cathedral was consecrated in 1897 and finally completed in 1939. Since the Catholic community of Melbourne in the early days was almost entirely Irish, the Cathedral was dedicated to St.Patrick, the patron saint of Ireland.

    The Cathedral is built on a traditional east-west axis, with the altar at the eastern end, symbolising belief in the resurrection of Christ. The plan is in the style of a Latin cross, consisting of a nave with side aisles, transepts with side aisles, a sanctuary with seven chapels, and sacristies. It is 103.6 metres long on its long axis, 56.4 metres wide across the transepts and 25.3 metres wide across the nave. The nave and transepts are 28.9 metres high. The central spire is 79.2 metres high and the flanking towers and spires are 61.9 metres high.

    The view is both breathtaking from afar and from near-by. A wonderful piece of architecture.

    St.Patrick'sCathedral
    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Architecture

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Melbourne Off The Beaten Path

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