Chinatown, Melbourne

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Little Bourke Street

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  • Chinatown, Melbourne
    Chinatown, Melbourne
    by cal6060
  • Chinatown, Melbourne
    Chinatown, Melbourne
    by cal6060
  • Chinatown, Melbourne
    Chinatown, Melbourne
    by cal6060
  • cjg1's Profile Photo

    Chinatown

    by cjg1 Updated Aug 9, 2013

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    Melbourne's Chinatown resembles most Chinatowns I have seen back in the states. This particular area of Melbourne is located on Little Bourke Street and branches out to side streets and alleyways. This Chinatown dates back to the Gold Rush days of the 1850's that brought a flood of Chinese immigrants looking to make it rich and is the longest continuous Chinese settlement in the Western world.

    Chinatown is a melting pot of Asian cultures; Chinese, Thai, Japanese, Malaysian, Vietnamese people call Chinatwon home and work. Many nice restaurants and shops line the street as well as the Five Arches decorated in traditional style. This is a great place to eat, shop and explore; especially the Tianjin Garden.

    My wife and I had a fun time exploring Chinatown and checking out the shops and attractions.

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    Chinatown

    by cal6060 Updated Aug 17, 2012

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    Chinatown, Melbourne
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    Melbourne is a city with diverse population live and work here with different colors, nationalities, cultures, religions, languages, sexual orientations, and etc. Chinese migrates to Melbourne in 1851, and remains the longest continuous Chinese settlement in the Western World. Interestingly, Chinatown is no longer just a hangout place for the Chinese and tourists, but it is a place where the locals hangout for restaurants, bars, food courts, shopping, and etc.

    I recommend here to backpackers to get cheap and good food. Check out their food courts...

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel

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    Chinatown- history and culture

    by abi_maha Written Jul 13, 2012

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    one of the 5 arches

    Chinatown today now predominantly extends along Little Bourke Street between Swanston St and Spring St. Eating houses and top class restaurants with the streetscape and its low-rise brick buildings, retaining its historic character is what makes this part of Melbourne history and culture rich. We passed through Chinatown as we made our way to Red Peppers restaurant (I have written another trip on that). The heritage streetscape has been well preserved, with few buildings reaching over three storeys in height. The area is dominated by restaurants from fine dining to laneway and arcade noodle houses, and is home to a number of Asian grocery stores, Chinese medicine and herbalist centres, bookstores, fashion boutiques and other retail outlets in arcades such as the Village Centre, The Target Centre and Paramount Plaza. True to its name and predominantly of Chinese ethnicity, you will also find Melbourne's Chinatown is truly cosmopolitan with a myriad of cuisines like Thai, Japanese, Malaysian, Vietnamese, Contemporary European and Australian to tempt your taste buds.

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  • arianne_1504's Profile Photo

    Chinatown

    by arianne_1504 Written Dec 7, 2011

    Chinatown is one of Melbourne's iconic precincts, and was an integral part of the goldrush days in the 1850's. Now it's home to all sorts of restaurants, shops, accommodation and of course the Chinatown Museum.

    Related to:
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    • Arts and Culture
    • Food and Dining

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  • Chinatown

    by grkboiler Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Chinatown is one of Melbourne's most popular ethnic areas. This has traditionally been a Chinese area since gold was discovered in Australia in 1851. Chinatown has restaurants, stores, a Chinese Museum, and major events throughout the year.

    Check the website for more info and events.

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  • touraco's Profile Photo

    Chinatown

    by touraco Written Aug 27, 2008

    Since me being a chinese, I will try make it a point to visit the Chinatown of the countries I visit. I had lunch in the chinese restaurant there but do find the prices are on the steep side and the taste is pretty ok only.

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  • xuessium's Profile Photo

    There is always a Chinatown somewhere

    by xuessium Updated Apr 14, 2008

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    Chinatown
    1 more image

    You can't really miss it - considering the ornate Chinese gates at the entrance of Little Bourke Street on both ends - SO typical - folks wanting to have even more of Chinese culture and food, considering some of you have just left it - you are in Dragonland Central...sort of.

    Chinatown actually spills over a few more streets around it and borders the Greek Precinct on the Eastern end. And it's a little more Asiantown these days too....with Singaporean, Thai, Japanese and Indian eateries mixed in for diversity.

    Experience the jostle of students around you going about their grocery shopping among the ethnic stores. OK, I won't joke about the stores since I actually find a few things I wanted in them.

    Hiding amidst the shops selling dried medicinal herbs and statues of Chinese Goddesses and Gods, you will find the very small and compact Chinese Museum. About 4 storeys of displays illustrate the history of the Chinese in Australia and Melbourne. In my personal opinion, I had seen better displays but it wouldn't hurt to drop in and have a look, if you had never visited such a museum before.

    And of course, you can't be in Chinatown without mentioning about food. Duh. This is the place to come for upmarket Chinese restaurants and Yum Cha spots such as Shark Fin House.

    Related to:
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    • Museum Visits
    • Hiking and Walking

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  • fishandchips's Profile Photo

    Get some real Chinese food

    by fishandchips Updated May 21, 2007

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    Cook chopping up chook

    Chinatown is a good spot to take a stroll and sample some good Chinese food and items. There are also Thai and Japanese options so plenty to to choose from.

    After walking past a few restaurants and being invited in for "the best food in Chinatown" you will notice the types of people sitting in the various restaurants. Some, like the Dragon Boat, seem to have mainly tourists and others seem to have locals in them. Try one of the local's choice though do have a look at the menu first as some items may not be to your liking at all (crispy fried pigs intestine etc etc).

    This trip involved stopping at one of the 'local' restaurants and we were not disappointed. Apart from being lower cost, being served hot chinese tea (bottomless tumbler) and having lots of poultry in the window our restaurant was a cash only place!! Quite bizzare really.

    Related to:
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    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
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  • jopetsy's Profile Photo

    Dinner at Chinatown - SUPPER INN

    by jopetsy Written May 7, 2006

    We enjoyed chinatown since its the only area opened past 5pm. Everyone closes at 5pm and you have nowhere to go after except for Chinatown. We enjoyed dinner always at SUPPER INN, it is around LT.BOURKE ST. but it is still partly hidden on one alley way but everyone knows this place. It is always jampacked and the food was great! HIGHLY RECOMMENDED.

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  • kenyneo's Profile Photo

    Chinatown in Melbourne ...compared to London

    by kenyneo Written Jul 2, 2005
    This gate looks better than the one in front...lol

    The entrance gate to Chinatown is not as grand as the one in London ( anyway even the one in London is not that great either ) . Perhaps I am demanding but I am sure they can do better than that.

    There are many Chinese, Korean, Japansen and Vietnamese restaurant along the Chinatown Precinct ...remember to try the Snow Crab and a few restaurants like

    a) Kum Den Bar and Restaurant ( 15 Hefferman Lane )

    b) Post Deng Restaurant ( Chinatown Precinct )

    c) Kimchi Grandma ( Bourke Street )

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    • Arts and Culture

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  • Little China in Big City

    by grantravel Written Jan 6, 2005

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Melbourne Chinatown- toys

    If your walking around the city of Melbourne looking for something a bit different, a great place to visit is Chinatown on Little Bourke Street.

    Here you'll find authentic Chinese restaurants, grocers and great little nick-knack shops that sell items available nowhere else in the city. I discovered some toy and figurine shops very unique to Chinatown, and well worth the look if your into that sort of thing.

    Related to:
    • Food and Dining
    • Arts and Culture
    • Museum Visits

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    Chinese Museum

    by Sweetberry1 Written Oct 4, 2004

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    The Chinese Museum is one of Chinatown's main attractions, providing visitors, with information about the history of Australians of Chinese descent since the mid19th Century.
    The Museum was opened in 1985 and consists of five exciting levels including an audio-visual theatre with a dynamic, multi screened slide and sound presentation.

    Opening Hours
    Sunday to Friday 10am to 4.30pm
    Saturday 12 noon to 4.30pm
    (closed Good Friday and Christmas Day)

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    Chinatown cont..

    by Sweetberry1 Written Oct 4, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Chinatown

    Chinatown predominantly extends along Little Bourke Street between Spring Street and Swanston Street. There are many eating houses and top class restaurants to satisfy the tastebuds.
    The streetscape and it's lowrise brick buildings, have retained the historic character of this cultural district.
    It is a very busy and important social centre for the Chinese Community, and proudly stands as one of Melbourne city's most popular venues.

    There are many traditional festivals and activities throuout the year, making Chinatown a popular destination in the city centre for local, interstate and international visitors.

    Related to:
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    • Festivals

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  • Sweetberry1's Profile Photo

    Chinatown.

    by Sweetberry1 Updated Oct 4, 2004

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    Chinatown

    During the gold rush of 1851, many Chinese were attracted to Victoria and the goldfields. Ships sailed to Australia from Hong Kong with their cargo of men who had come in search of the "New Gold Mountain".
    The small Chinese community in Little Bourke Street provided for all the needs of these diggers, lodgings en route to the goldfields, food, equipment and medicine.

    In the 1860s many Chinese district associations began to purchase land in little Bourke Street to build clubrooms which would serve as meeting places for the Chinese community.
    From the early 1870s, until the early twentieth century, Chinatown experienced good growth. For as gold dried up on the diggings, those who did not return to China went back to Melbourne's Chinatown which, for those who stayed, represented the only community they had.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

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  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    Chinatown

    by keeweechic Updated Aug 5, 2003

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    Chinatown is found on Little Bourke Street and has existed ever since Chinese prospectors joined the rush to the gold fields in the 1850's. While I find it small compared to many Chinatown’s I have seen overseas (i.e. San Francisco), it is the centre of the Chinese community in Melbourne. The Museum of Chinese Australian History in Cohen Place shows the considerable Chinese contribution to Australian history.

    There are some superb restaurants and ‘local’ shops. My favourite was a Chinese furniture and craft shop (just out the back from where I worked) that I was frequently in and out of. At Chinese New Year, the streets come alive of course with the sounds of drums and dragon dances.

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