Merino Travel Guide

  • Merino
    Merino
    by balhannah
  • Merino
    Merino
    by balhannah
  • Merino
    Merino
    by balhannah

Merino Things to Do

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    Fulton's Flour Mill

    by balhannah Updated Sep 23, 2012

    The FULTON family is believed to have arrived in Melbourne from Scotland about 1839-40. In 1857 James Fulton built the first flour mill in Merino, a scene of much activity in the early days, running night and day shifts. grinding local wheat and that from other districts. Owing to the climate changing, local wheat proved unsuitable for flour.
    It was sold and used as a Masonic Lodge and converted into their temple.

    It is now a private home

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Architecture

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    Merino 4 more images

    by balhannah Written Sep 23, 2012

    Only 200 residents, does that qualify for a Ghost Town, I am not sure!

    Merino is a good place to visit if you like seeing buildings untouched, still in their original state from the 1800's. Many shops and houses are empty, there really isn't a lot open anymore. Did it matter, no, not to me. I walked what there was of the street, saw some massive buildings and wondered what they were. I think one would have been a Bank. Wide streets, enough for the Bullock teams to come into town and be able to turn around. Golly this town must have bustled once to keep 5 Hotels in operation!

    It is a step back in time walking around here!

    Related to:
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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    Drovers Nightmare 2 more images

    by balhannah Written Sep 23, 2012

    We actually drove past this sculpture as we entered Merino. Turning around, we came back to have a look, and found it was called ‘The Drover’s Nightmare.’ It is located at the starting point for the “The Merino Old Stock Route Walking Trail", which follows the designated old stock route, one of Victoria’s oldest and still in use. Seating is along the trail, and so are photos from the past to highlight significant sites, and emphasise areas of interest to both locals and visitors alike.

    I really liked the sculpture, it was so different!
    It was built as a tribute to all Drover's who had lost stock and their lives in flooded waters through-out Australia, and to those who have risked their lives to protect their stock in Australia.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Road Trip
    • Arts and Culture

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