Port Campbell Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by cjg1
  • Things to Do
    by cjg1
  • Things to Do
    by cjg1

Most Recent Things to Do in Port Campbell

  • cjg1's Profile Photo

    The Headland of the harbour at Port Campbell

    by cjg1 Updated Dec 27, 2013
    4 more images

    The Headland is known to local Aboriginal people as Purroitchihoorrong 'the spirit voice that mocks you'. These cliffs are limestone and like so much of the Great Ocean Road; they are eroding. Some of the area is able to be hiked while some areas have been considered too unstable to be safe. My wife and I admired them from afar as well as taking in one of the lookout points.

    Was this review helpful?

  • cjg1's Profile Photo

    Bay of Islands Coastal Park

    by cjg1 Updated Dec 27, 2013
    4 more images

    My wife and I stopped here to enjoy the views. Many areas like this along the Great Ocean Road are perfect for stopping as they have a car park and several lookout areas. This particular area is part of a coastal reserve and is protected land.

    Was this review helpful?

  • cjg1's Profile Photo

    Worm Bay

    by cjg1 Updated Dec 27, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Beautiful Beach Area (11/2012)
    4 more images

    Worm Bay is a calm stretch of beach on the Great Ocean Road by the eastern side of the Bay of Martyrs. The reefs and headlands protect this beach from rough surf so it is ideal for swimming. This beach was a nice stretch of beige sand between some limestone cliffs. The water was very calm with few small waves in the blue/green waters; a real change from the rough surf we had seen most of the day.

    If the water was only warmer; my wife would have been in there in a heartbeat. She managed to get her toes wet but alas it was frigid cold.

    Was this review helpful?

  • cjg1's Profile Photo

    Two Mile Bay

    by cjg1 Updated Dec 27, 2013
    4 more images

    Two Mile Bay is located just pass the arch and has some seriously hazardous surf conditions. This is where the brave come to surf or fish. I seriously couldn't imagine anyone wanting to take the risk; the waves are fierce.

    Was this review helpful?

  • cjg1's Profile Photo

    Thunder Cave

    by cjg1 Updated Dec 24, 2013

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The power of nature
    4 more images

    We heard it before we saw it. The soaund of the roar was unbelievable and as we got closer it only got louder. When we finally came upon the Thunder Cave; it was another Wow moment.

    Erosion created the Thunder cave as well as many of the other Geological wonders of the Great Ocean Road. The Ocean roars into this crevice of rock with such a force it almost sounds like a wild animal or something of myth. It is a spectacular sight as the ocean pours and and it is psrayed upwards by the blowhole. Wow, another wonderful sight to see and a must stop along the GOR.

    Was this review helpful?

  • cjg1's Profile Photo

    Bay of Martyrs

    by cjg1 Updated Dec 24, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    My wife and the splendor
    4 more images

    Bay of Martyrs is another stop we made along the Great Ocean Road that has increadible views. The Bay has a cove beach with rocky cliffs and small rock formations in the ocean waters. This area as well was formed by erosion; quite windswept and with large waves. The beach area though is alot calmer than that of the Twelve Apostles since the cove breaks up the heavy surf.

    This is yet another wonderful stop we made and I'm glad we did. My wife and I are still amazed how beautiful the coastline here truly is.

    Was this review helpful?

  • cjg1's Profile Photo

    Gibson's Steps

    by cjg1 Updated Dec 24, 2013
    4 more images

    A short drive down on the Great Ocean Road past the 12 Apostles are the Gibson's Steps. The steps are weathered cliffs that look like steps decending down to the beach below.

    My wife and I visited this area and took in the incredible views from this point. It was a windy day and the ocean made such an incredible roar as it crashed on the rocks. This is yet another wonderful stop along the GOR that you must take the time and see for yourself.

    Was this review helpful?

  • cjg1's Profile Photo

    Twelve Apostles Centre

    by cjg1 Updated Dec 24, 2013
    4 more images

    The Twelve Apostles Center is where we parked our car and got some local information before heading down the path to see the 12 Apostles for ourselves. Here you wiull find local area information, a small cafe selling food and drinks, bathrooms and the car park.

    Was this review helpful?

  • cjg1's Profile Photo

    London Arch

    by cjg1 Updated Aug 6, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Liz & I and the London Arch(11/2012)
    4 more images

    London Arch or "London Bridge" as it is also called was another highlight of our trip on the Great Ocean Road. The London Arch is much like the Twelve Apostles, as it too was formed by erosion from the wind and surf from the Southern Ocean. The Arch once resembled a bridge but erosion finally collapsed the span in 1990. Now, all that remains in the arch sitting out in the waters.

    This was another amazing sight in Port Campbell National Park that I was glad to see with my own eyes. Simply unbelievable to see in person.

    Was this review helpful?

  • cjg1's Profile Photo

    The Twelve Apostles

    by cjg1 Updated Aug 6, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The
    4 more images

    The Highlight of our trip on the Great Ocean Road was seeing the Twelve Apostles. The My wife had wanted to see this for many years so finally in November 2012 we decided to travel the Great Ocean Road to make her dream a reality.

    The Twelve Apostles are limestone stacks that jut out of the Southern Ocean. The stacks have been formed from many years of erosion from the strong winds and harsh surf. Every year, erosion takes 2cm off of the limestone. Over the years the view has changed due to the erosion with the most dramatic change to the landscape being in 2009 when a stack collapsed into the ocean.

    Twelve Apostles is something you have to see to truly appreciate the beauty of it; pictures do not do it justice. There are several paths with viewing pavilions to take in the beauty of the place. We spent about two hours just wandering the Cliffside admiring the cliffs, the limestone stacks and the crashing ocean waves below on the beach. The power of the waves is unbelievable with the roaring sounds and large amount of sea spray that we experienced even high on the cliffs.

    To me this was an incredible experience like no other. I will never forget how I felt when I first saw those rocks jutting out of the water and watching how the sun changed the color of the limestone as the time passed. This is a definite must see for anyone who is visiting the area.

    Twelve Apostles is something you have to see to truly appreciate the beauty of it; pictures do not do it justice.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

    Was this review helpful?

  • cjg1's Profile Photo

    Port Campbell Discovery Walk Lookout

    by cjg1 Updated Feb 6, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Liz and i enjoying the views (11/2012)
    4 more images

    After enjoying lunch in the town of Port Cambell we were back on the Great Ocean Road to see some more sights. We came upon the Discovery Walk Lookout about ten minutes out of town. This area has a scenic look out of the town and ocean as well as walking trails. We decided to stop and take in some of the views.

    The views were very nice of the town, the beach and the ocean. Several hikers were here enjoying the rugged terrain but we didn't have time to partake in the 2+ hour hike.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park

    Was this review helpful?

  • cjg1's Profile Photo

    The Blowhole

    by cjg1 Updated Feb 6, 2013

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The Blowhole is a cavernous area of rock at the back of the Thunder Cave. Here is where the real "roar" of the ocean is magnified. The Blowhole also spews some serious sea spray upwards with every crashing wave.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • cjg1's Profile Photo

    The Arch

    by cjg1 Updated Jan 24, 2013

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    4 more images

    The Arch was another stunning geological formation we had the pleasure of viewing along our Great Ocean Road Journey. This is just another example of the power that wind and water has on rocks and the great visual result.

    Was this review helpful?

  • Waxbag's Profile Photo

    Twelve Apostles, pure magic

    by Waxbag Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Twelve Apostles nearing sunset
    3 more images

    This section of the Great Ocean Road is the most photographed and visited. Here the unrelenting sea has battered the ancient limestone coast leaving a spectacular series of rock stacks, known as the Twelve Apostles. Currently, however, there are only six Apostles which is a testament to the process of erosion and undercutting that is ongoing and that we are absolutely assured of loosing more in the future (the last to fall was in 2005). New Apostles are also probable and the undercutting of the large promontory, from which platform number two stands, is bound to be the next addition. Visit the Apostles any time of day but especially coordinate your schedule for a sunrise or sunset viewing as it is absolutely magical, weather permitting. The Apostles are easily accessible from the Great Ocean Road where one can find plenty of accommodation and restaurants in Port Cambell just 15kms away. There is also a B&B 5km inland of the welcome center called the “Twelve Apostles Motel and Country Retreat”. The woman who runs it is friendly and offers country style cooking from her kitchen.

    See video at The Great Ocean Road

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • Waxbag's Profile Photo

    Loch Ard Gorge, where history meets the sea

    by Waxbag Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Loch Ard Gorge Arch
    1 more image

    Included as a part of the Twelve Apostles Marine Park and the Port Cambell National Park, this extraordinary gorge is named after the unfortunate three-masted square-rigged iron-hulled clipper Loch Ard which foundered off Mutton Bird Island in 1978. Captain Gibb was trying to enter the western entrance of Bass Strait during heavy fog which was known as “threading the eye of a needle”. Two members of the 55 person crew survived by clinging on to parts of the floating wreckage that fortuitously washed up into a protective gorge that now bears the ill-fated clipper’s name. There are some spectacular arches along this section of coast along with a blowhole, several caves, and of course a gorge. There are four walking trails that range from 900m to 3.2kms.

    See video at The Great Ocean Road

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Road Trip
    • Hiking and Walking

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Port Campbell

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

98 travelers online now

Comments

Port Campbell Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Port Campbell things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Port Campbell sightseeing.

View all Port Campbell hotels