Port Campbell Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by cjg1
  • Things to Do
    by cjg1
  • Things to Do
    by cjg1

Best Rated Things to Do in Port Campbell

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    The GOR: The beaches

    by xuessium Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    FunkyToilets@BellsBeach

    TORQUAY
    22km from Geelong (GL), both tours drove passed this seaside town without a stop. The beach here is popular with families. It is also a Fishermans Beach where you will find boating, sailing & windsurfing. Lifesavers patrol available during summer.

    BELLS BEACH
    The 1st stop with Gowest Tours is Bells Beach, 30km from GL, for a 20 mins toilet stop.

    Bells Beach is a world-famous surf beach. It is a venue for the world surfing titles: Cliff-flanked sandy beach with large ocean swells. Only for the experienced.

    I arrived on a bright and sunny but windy morning and standing on the cliff-face, I could see surfers out on the brownish-hue beach, challenging the elements. Amazing stuff!

    The toilets here are amazing: came highly decorated with aboriginal motiffs. A sight to behold as well!

    ANGLESEA
    37km from GL, this is a 0.5 hour stop with the Greyhound Tours for morning Billy Tea & Lamington cakes. Truth be told, the site of stoppage is not next to the beach but for folks who wishes to know, Anglesea has a popular beach which is excellent for swimming and surfing. Large vegetation-covered sand dunes protect the beach. Lifesavers patrol available during summer.

    LORNE
    This was an unexpected stop for 40 mins with Gowest Tours as my coach ran into engine trouble. I relished the chance to stretch my legs and to enjoy the spectacular scenary. Lorne is one the most popular resort towns on the GOR. Plenty of beautiful holidaying houses littered the road. There is a wide sandy beach on Loutit Bay with gentle surf and is safe for swimming and surfing. Again there are lifesavers patrol during summer. Lorne is 65km from GL.

    APOLLO BAY
    The last major beach is at Apollo Bay, 105km from GL for the lunch stop.

    It is a wide crescent-shaped sandy beach. The protected waters make it popular with families. There are lifesavers patrol in summer.

    I spent about 30 mins on the beach (since I had to wait for my fish & chips anyway) on my first foray. The crescent shaped bay makes for great photography.

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    The GOR: 'Roos, Koalas & Otway National Park

    by xuessium Updated Jun 24, 2006

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    Koalas

    With Gowest Tours, we made a stop at Anglesea Golf Course which incidentally, is also home to plenty of wild kangaroos! It's quite amusing really, there you have them, lazy roos baking under the sun, hardly battling an eyelid at the folks busy driving their golfballs across the range. I wonder if they could do this with the lions at the Safaris! HA HA!

    Gowest Tours also makes a stop at an area along the coastline for wild koalas sighting. Test your eyesight and try to pick out those lazy slumbers from among branches of the Eucalyptus Trees.

    Otway National Park is sited at the tip of Cape Otway and is home to dense, tall-timbered rainforest within 88,000 hectares. There are waterfalls, lakes, glades of massive tree ferns and plenty of native animals. There are drives and walks here. Our guide took us on a 30 minutes walk among timber skyscrappers (so huge that their base could dwarf a human easily) and sultry tree ferns, with their young shoots curling shyly away. Sniff the rich Eucalyptus scented air and hear the faint gurgles of forest streams. Very therapeutic.

    After Otway, the tours left the snug of the coastline and plunge into a dullish 45 minutes drive through the farmlands. Fear not, the best is yet to come.

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    12 APOSTLES FROM A HELICOPTER

    by aussiejen Updated Apr 24, 2006

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    AERIAL VIEW OF PORT CAMPBELL
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    Seeing the 12 Apostles from a helicopter was the highlight of my visit to the Great Ocean Road. I have been down here many times but this was the first time I saw them from the air.
    Views are spectacular from the air. It's one continuous photo opportunity!

    I highly recommend you take one of these flights.

    There are 3 different flights, starting from $90 for a 10 minute flight.

    We did the 15 minute flight which took us along the coast to Port Campbell.

    Check out the website for all relevant information.

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    Loch Ard Gorge

    by iandsmith Written Jul 2, 2007

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    You can have the Twelve Apostles, this place has so much more to offer. Apart from the truly dramatic scenery there's the tragic story of how it got its name, i.e. the Loch Ard was a clipper ship carrying cargo and passengers from Great Britain when it was caught here in treacherous seas and foundered on the rocks on June 1st, 1878.
    The story of how the cabin boy and a girl were the only two survivors is an extraordinary tale and, just as extraordinary, though horrible, is how 11 of the 52 bodies were washed up into this cavity (pic 5) and it glowed at night with the phosphoresence of wax matches from the cargo.
    Fascinating geologically are the "Lace Curtains", virtually exposed stalactites jutting out from the cliff face where groundwater has seeped along cracks in the limestone and created these rare formations.

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  • Twelve Apostles

    by Anne12 Written Aug 29, 2005

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    This is one area you must do, this is sthe scene you see advertising the Great Ocean Rd.

    The formation of rocks along the coast line, 8 now surviving the tides of time.

    From Port Campbell you follow the signs to The Apostles. They are approximately 15 minutes from Port.
    You will see a large building on your right, this is the carpark and information area. From here you follow the boardwalks and areas where you can sit and take in the wonderful view.

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    Loch Ard Gorge, where history meets the sea

    by Waxbag Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Loch Ard Gorge Arch
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    Included as a part of the Twelve Apostles Marine Park and the Port Cambell National Park, this extraordinary gorge is named after the unfortunate three-masted square-rigged iron-hulled clipper Loch Ard which foundered off Mutton Bird Island in 1978. Captain Gibb was trying to enter the western entrance of Bass Strait during heavy fog which was known as “threading the eye of a needle”. Two members of the 55 person crew survived by clinging on to parts of the floating wreckage that fortuitously washed up into a protective gorge that now bears the ill-fated clipper’s name. There are some spectacular arches along this section of coast along with a blowhole, several caves, and of course a gorge. There are four walking trails that range from 900m to 3.2kms.

    See video at The Great Ocean Road

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  • A Swim or Lay in the Sun

    by Anne12 Written Sep 15, 2005

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    Port Campbell has a lovely beach and sand area to play in.
    Please swim between the flags.
    If the life savers aren't on patrol, enjoy the water but be very careful.

    You can also surf at Port and surrounding beaches.

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    Port Campbell National Park - Bay of Islands

    by ATXtraveler Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    As you continue on your journey from Port Campbell to Warrnambool, past Loch Ard Gorge, you come up on the next portion of the Port Campbell National Park, the Bay of Islands. At both of the previous portions of the park, you experience the view of the landscape from a position of height over the landmarks, but when you enter into the walks of the Bay of Islands, you get a whole new perspective. The walls of the coastline almost surround you as you see these larger than life sea walls slowly being carved away in front of your eyes!

    The nature walks were fairly short, so you they are easily available for you and the rest of the thousands of tourists following directly behind you!

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  • Be a Mouse

    by Anne12 Written Sep 20, 2005

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    And vist the Timboon Cheese Factory.

    This is the Timboon Farmhouse Cheese that is made from organic milk to traditional cheese making principles.

    The Mousetrap is open daily from October to April and open from Wednesday to Sunday from May to September.

    Sales and tastings between 10.30am to 4.00pm

    This is a great place to visit. It has some wonderful cheeses and other goodies to taste.

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  • Check out the Penguins

    by Anne12 Written Sep 20, 2005

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    London Bridge is approx 8kms West of Port Campbell, this is where there is a colony of about 80/100 birds.
    Viewing is 20/60 metres from the Penguins.

    12 Apostles which is approx 12 kms from Port Campbell, this is where there are about 1,000 Penguins.
    Viewers are 60 metres from the Penguins/

    These are the Little Penguins.

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  • National Parks of Port Campbell and area

    by Anne12 Written Sep 20, 2005

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    Port Campbell:-

    Bayof Martyrs
    Port Campbell Discovery walks

    Loch Ard Gorge Area:-

    Shipwreck Walk
    Geology
    Living on the Edge

    Beach Walks:-

    Newfield Bay
    Gibson Beach
    Crofts Bay

    The visitor Information centre in Port Campbell has many brochures for you to look at for directions and special requirements.
    OR you can ring Parks Victoria on 131963

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    Thunder Cave

    by iandsmith Written Jul 8, 2007

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    The steps down

    I remember 35 years ago I went into Thunder Cave with my son. It was one of life's most unbelieveable moments and I've never forgotten it but, life changes and, down here, so does the landscape.
    Originally there was a land bridge between the two jutting cliffs but that collapsed some time in the pre-settlement past and, these days, there is a viewing platform at the bottom that discourages would-be adventurers from going into the cave.
    When you see how you would access the cave from the view point it's easy to understand why they've done that. In a word it's "dangerous" and I should have spelt that with a capital "D".
    Having said that, the time we went in there we got to experience how the cave got its name. Despite the fact that the swell was minimal at the time the roar inside the cave was simply awe-inspiring. It was hard to believe that such a relatively small movement of water could create such a racket.
    It's in the process of erosion and, in time, will become a bridge itself and ultimately collapse just as the rest of the coast is doing.

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    The Twelve Apostles

    by iandsmith Updated Jul 8, 2007

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    With sunnies over the lens
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    Not far from Loch Ard Gorge, the best of the Great Ocean Road, lies the most publicized part of the Great Ocean Road.
    One thing you can rest assured on here is that you will never be lonely. The last time (of three) that I was there there were 4 helicopters taking off in rotation (unintended pun but I'll take it). They had a new load every ten minutes so, since it was a five minute flight, you've got some idea of what the noise was like.
    The new carpark and walkways make it all so easy these days, so unlike the first time I was there when you simply pulled up and followed the track over to the scenery.
    No, these days it's fully boarded with proper viewing platform, busloads of tourists and, at sunset, everyone wants that memorable shot so they're queued up along the railing.
    However, it doesn't happen every evening so sometimes you have to give nature a little help, such as here in pics 1 & 3 where I covered my lens with my sunglasses. Pics 2&4 show you what it was like without that tinge.
    The last picture clearly indicates that though it was sunset of much promise, it never really happened. Oh, well, same time tomorrow.
    As a signature of how time worn they are, the nearest one, now collapsed, only did so in 2005.

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    Historical facts

    by iandsmith Written Jul 8, 2007

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    The small protected harbour

    Port Campbell got its name from Captain Alexander Campbell who had a reputation as 'the last of the buccaneers'.
    Being in charge of the whaling station at Port Fairy led him to take shelter in Port Campbell Bay in the 1840s during his trips between King Island and Port Fairy.
    Shell middens along the coast have provided evidence of the ancient presence of the Kirrae-Wurong people.
    White men chasing whales and seals were the first European visitors to these shores. As the colony grew thus Bass Strait became a significant shipping route for cargo ships. Pastoralists moved into the area in the late 1840s with Duncan Hoyle establishing Buckleys Creek Pastoral Run in 1846 and Charles Brown leasing Glenample Pastoral Run (this property was where the two survivors reached after the Loch Ard disaster) in 1847.
    The coast was so inhospitable that when Governor La Trobe travelled its length in 1845-46 he observed: 'I think a boat might possibly land at Port Campbell in most weathers; but with this exception, I do not know a single spot on the whole coast from Hopkins to Cape Otway where a landing could be effected with any chance of certainty.' Indeed Port Campbell is still the only sheltered refuge between Apollo Bay and Warrnambool and that through an entrance that no big ship could undertake.
    This section of coastline is so isolated from the rest of the world that it wasn't until 1878 when the first land sales took place and, even today, there are less than 300 residents. The survey of the town site was probably due, in part, to the establishment of a beacon on the headland in 1874. By 1880 a proper pier had been built in the area of today's jetty.

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    The massacre (not)

    by iandsmith Written Jul 8, 2007

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    The sleepy hamlet of Port Campbell

    In 1882 the town achieved its 15 minutes (okay, maybe days) of fame throughout Victoria and Australia because it was the subject of one of the country's most famous hoaxes. At the time there was an unjustifiable fear of the possibility of a Russian invasion, even leading to gun emplacements in Melbourne.
    Someone with a warped sence of humour decided to fuel this paranoia by telling The Age that there was a Russian fleet ready to attack. The invasion was to begin at Port Campbell and move across to Melbourne. So excited did the media become that some other Melbourne newspapers actually reported massacres and thousands of Russian troops moving towards Melbourne. Finally someone tried to find out the truth of the rumours and it was discovered there was only one tiny ketch anywhere near Port Campbell.

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