Wilsons Promontory National Park Off The Beaten Path

  • Sarah heading to Sandy Beach
    Sarah heading to Sandy Beach
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  • Cape Liptrap Lighthouse
    Cape Liptrap Lighthouse
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  • Off The Beaten Path
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Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Wilsons Promontory National Park

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    Past the Dunes... Sandy Beach

    by ATXtraveler Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Sarah heading to Sandy Beach

    Since Wilsons Promontory is a National Park, there are no accomodation options within the park itself other than campsites, we ended up staying in the small town of Sandy Beach, which is named after.... a Sandy Beach!

    After we checked into our accomodation, we went down a back trail and found the beautiful and uninhabited Sandy Beach. Kilometers of open beach property, with just a few small townhomes with access.

    I would definitely recommend staying here and enjoying this beach... maybe when the weather warms up just a tad!

    Related to:
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    • Beaches
    • Road Trip

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    Overheads

    by iandsmith Updated Jan 6, 2007

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    Art on high
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    If the ocean was awe inspiring, some of the cloud patterns weren't far behind. Cirrus formations started to drift in, and cirrus somehow always manages to be a bit special. At first wispy, then more all encompassing, they make for enchanting art in the sky, don't you think?
    My personal favourite is pic 2.

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    • Seniors
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    The freeway

    by iandsmith Updated Jan 6, 2007

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    Animal or beach

    I wasn't sure how to categorize this photo, animal or beach.
    An echidna on the beach. Not an ant in sight. What was this all about? I feared he (or she, I wasn't going to check) may be unwell, so far removed from the bush.
    I took the photo and continued on. It had moved freely and seemed OK but I still had lingering doubts so, a few hours later I made an enquiry at the National Park HQ.
    The girl told me it wasn't that rare for one to be seen there and, as she explained to me, they use it like a highway. It's much easier to get from place to place along the hard sand of the beach than ploughing your way through the scrub. Obviously they're not entirely stupid.
    The echidna is a true rarity in the animal world, it and the platypus are the only two monotremes in existence - egg laying mammals.
    I've handled a couple (wrapped in a towel to get them off a road) and I have a sort of affection for them.
    It brings to mind the fight I saw between and echidna and a snake.
    Who won?
    The echidna, on points.

    Related to:
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    • National/State Park
    • Beaches

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    Little Oberon Beach

    by iandsmith Written Oct 18, 2006

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    Stunning colours
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    All the time as I neared my destination, I couldn't help but think how stunning the azure ocean was on this balmy day. The spring flowers and the red rocks (pic 4), the dramatic hills behind (pic 3) with charred remnants of the previous year's bushfire and the contrast of them all together (pic 5).
    How fortunate was I to be there on this special day. With the word "sublime" ringing in my brain I soaked up as much of it as time would allow.
    It was the sort of day that brings people back to Wilsons Promontory again and again.

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    • Hiking and Walking
    • Beaches
    • Surfing

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    On the way

    by iandsmith Written Oct 18, 2006

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    Exquisite
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    This gives you some idea of what the walk around to Little Oberon was like, from the exquisite colours of the ocean, to the remnants of bushfires (pic 4) to the granite that underlies all this area (pic 2).
    The special view back to little Mount Oberon (pic 3) and the classic windblown vegetation as I turned around the headland (pic 5).

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park

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    Flying (not so high)

    by iandsmith Written Oct 18, 2006

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    A colourful display

    In Australia, beaches are used for lots of things so I am rarely surprised these days when I stroll along the sand.
    This windsurfing chute was giving its owner a couple of nice jumps as he practised on the sands of Norman Bay the morning I walked to Little Oberon Beach.

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    • Windsurfing
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    Spring is sprung

    by iandsmith Written Oct 18, 2006

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    Give me a daisy a day
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    Australia generally doesn't have large flowers. In the springtime in the bush it's like someone sprinkled the salt all over the table, only it's in colours.
    Yellow and blue predominate in this area, particularly your basic daisies for the former but the latter involves many plants, including bush orchids (pic 2) and kangaroo apples (pic 5).
    If you keep your eyes peeled it really is surprising just how much diversity there is and how surprising that some that seem so fragile can survive at all.
    The walk around to Little Oberon Beach was full of such scenarios.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Women's Travel

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    On a roll

    by iandsmith Written Oct 16, 2006

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    Art in seaweed

    The next morning I wandered off alone, aiming for Little Oberon Beach.
    At first the sand was my focus, and the wonderful shapes of the seaweed littering the beach, particularly at the southern end....

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    In keeping with tradition

    by iandsmith Written Oct 16, 2006

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    Reflections of a mountain
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    Rosemarie used to come here a lot in her youth. I sometimes think she was hoping to recapture some of it but, as often happens with these things, the carefree nature of our younger days is generally lost when ageing.
    We opted to go for a pleasant afternoon walk, along memory lane for Rosemarie. Little Mount Oberon tantalized with its reflection in the sand, or more correctly the water left in the small depressions in the sand.
    It was a lovely day with little wind to disturb the rhythm of the walk so we wandered to the end of Norman Bay and sat on a rock and reminisced.

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    The second time around

    by iandsmith Written Oct 16, 2006

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    Tempting, isn't it

    My second venture to the Prom was in spring, 2006. We had one and a half days of perfect weather there then a day of the worst kind with gale force winds.
    Coming towards Tidal River I had forgotten just how beautiful the beaches were. This was a prompt reminder.

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    Tarra Bulga Ntl. Park

    by Myndo Updated May 9, 2006

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    Yarram Nt. Park

    Not far from the Wilsons Promontory Ntl Park this is a more "off the beaten path" destination.

    The park has a temperate rainforest, that is fun exploring on unpaved roads, walking tracks and on picnic places.
    At Balook is the visitor Centre.

    Quite well known is the Bulga Ntl Parks famous swing bridge, that has a wonderful view into the forest. A good place to get a feeling of the rainforest, ... all inclusive, even leeches. Brrr. Take some salt or vinegar with you to get rid of them,

    More info on the way north you can find in my Snowy River pages

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • National/State Park

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    Cape Liptrap Lighthouse

    by ATXtraveler Updated Oct 1, 2005

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    Cape Liptrap Lighthouse
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    Cape Liptrap Lighthouse is definitely a true definition of the Off the Beaten Path activity. Located west of Wilsons Promontory on the way back to Melbourne, this difficult to find landmark is worth a quick look, but do not expect gradeur. After turning down a gravel road and driving for several kilometers, you enter a carpark at the end of the road. No, they did not have a single sign saying you are in the right place, but luckily we all know lighthouses are at the end of the road!

    The lighthouse is unique in the fact that this was the first commissioned lighthouse by the Commonwealth that solely ran unmanned. It has been in operation since 1913, and still protects ships entering the Bass Strait today.

    You can also get a view of Wilsons Prom on a clear day! This is definitely worth a stop if you are driving to or from the area, but do not make a special trip!

    Related to:
    • Beaches

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