Wilsons Promontory National Park Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by bsfreeloader
  • Looking down to Little Oberon Bay
    Looking down to Little Oberon Bay
    by iandsmith
  • Fungal growth
    Fungal growth
    by iandsmith

Most Recent Things to Do in Wilsons Promontory National Park

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    Norman Beach

    by TarjaH Updated Jan 25, 2009

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    Sand on Norman Beach

    Norman Beach next to the Tidal River camping site is one of the nicest places in Prom. I took my evening walk on this 1,5 kilometres long beach and if I would have had my sneakers with me, I would have also jogged in the mornings.
    Time when I visited here, it water was too cold for swimming but brochures says that Norman beach is one of the safest beach to swim with Tidal River.
    And like you can see from the picture, sand on beach were so soft.

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    Millers Landing Nature Walk

    by TarjaH Written Jan 22, 2009

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    Resting

    Millers Landing Nature Walk is also short and easy walk but you can see different kind of nature than on Tidal River’s surroundings. During the walk I saw many kangaroos resting under trees, black swans and mangroves which by the way are most southern mangroves in the world. Also banksias were starting to blossom.

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    Visit Squeaky Beach

    by TarjaH Updated Jan 21, 2009

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    Surfer on Squeaky Beach

    When I came to the beach I tried to find birds which are chippering. After a while I realized that noises are coming from quartz sand while I’m walking on it. Surfers are using this beach.

    Squeaky Beach’s parking lot is located along Wilsons Promontory Road little bit before Tidal River camping site. You can also hike from Tidal River, track starts from Tidal River’s Loo-Errn track

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    Loo-Errn Track

    by TarjaH Updated Jan 20, 2009

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    Tidal River from Loo-Errn Track

    Loo-Errn track is located next to the Tidal River camping site. Ground of the track is wooden so you can do the walk also with wheelchair. Even if walk is only one kilometer long, Tidal River offers great surroundings just to relax and fell the nature.
    I by myself saw fishes in the river, different kind of parrots in the trees and few wombats dining on the beach.

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    Squeaky Beach revisited

    by iandsmith Updated Nov 8, 2007

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    Lovely to look at, lovely to be there
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    One of the other things that people clamour to do is walk Squeaky Beach, or surf it or fish it. It certainy is one of Australia's classic beaches and I, for one, can but agree with the rest.
    Here is a selection of shots from my third visit there.

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    The mountain beyond

    by iandsmith Written Nov 2, 2007

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    As seen from Squeaky
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    Mount Bishop, a granite outcrop seen in all bar one of these pictures, is something of a forgotten prominence in the park yet it looms large behind Squeaky Beach and the big bald patch smacks you in the eye when you first approach the park down the main road.
    You round a corner and there, right between the trees bordering the road, looms this large slab of granite.
    It's always grabbed my attention from a photographic point of view and here I share some of my snaps with you.

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    Is there life on the mountain?

    by iandsmith Written Nov 2, 2007

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    Fungal growth
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    Yes, lots of it, especially in spring when the gum tips compete with flowers for the brightest display.
    People from overseas are often surprised that Australian native flowers are generally so small compared to their home country. Indeed, it's the fact that there's a lot of them that gives the colour you see in the bush.
    You also have to remember that most of them are primary growth so, if you're walking in a tertiary forest, you may not see a lot of them. Better to be there just after a bushfire when they can be prolific.

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    I have been to the mountain

    by iandsmith Updated Nov 2, 2007

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    Looking down to Little Oberon Bay
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    There's three things that most people do when they go to Wilsons Promontory and one of those is to scale the heights of Mount Oberon.
    Its brooding presence sits over the campsite at Tidal River and taunts you to come to the top yet it was my third trip there before I managed the peak.
    The first was cancelled due to the recent bushfires, the second the weather was unkind and time didn't allow; the third I made it my sole goal and, when I reached the top, was nearly blown off for my troubles, such was the strength of the wind at the summit.
    The views are extensive, particularly if you get a clear day. At least four bays are visible to the north and the sea and many islands can be seen to the west and south.
    Looking east you can make out the sea again on the other side of the promontory through a gap adjacent to Mount Wilson.
    The walk up takes about half an hour and you would be well advised to take some fluids if it's the slightest bit warm. The carpark is about half way up the hill and the track is broad enough to take traffic so you won't get lost.

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    Go Birdwatching

    by bsfreeloader Written Oct 15, 2006

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    Laughing Kookaburas
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    Wilsons Promontory is known for its diversity of birdlife. Among the most commonly encountered species are Emu, Pacific and Silver Gulls, Sooty Oystercatcher, Masked Lapwing, Australian Wood Duck, Pacific Duck, Chestnut Teal, Galah, Rainbow Lorikeet, Crimson Rosella, Laughing Kookaburra, Silvereye, and Superb Blue Wren.

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    Go Animal Spotting

    by bsfreeloader Written Oct 15, 2006

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    Common Wombat

    Marsupials abound at Wilsons Promontory. The most conspicuous of these are Eastern Grey Kangaroos and Swamp Wallabies but it also is a good place to see Common Wombats, which are particularly active in the Tidal River area after dark.

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    Hike the Trails

    by bsfreeloader Written Oct 15, 2006

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    Wilsons Promontory has a number of fairly easy hikes that will give you a good introduction to the park, its flora, and its fauna. Most of these hikes also feature some great scenery. More difficult than some of the other hikes, the 3.4 kilometer hike to the Mount Oberon Summit is one of the most rewarding. From the summit’s rocky outcroppings, you will be blessed with panoramic views of Tidal River, the coast, and the Prom’s offshore islands. Another rewarding hike is the 5.8 kilometer Lilly Pully Gully Circuit Walk, which takes you through a warm temperate rainforest and tall stringybark forest. Also worthwhile are the many hikes essentially originating from Tidal River, including the Loo-Errn Track, the Squeaky/Picnic/Whisky Beach Circuit, the Pillar Point Track, the Tidal Overlook Circuit, and the Lilly Pully Link Track.

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    Australian Flora and Fauna

    by Myndo Written May 9, 2006

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    Wombat
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    Flora: lots of Ferns and special plants in the rainforest up Mt. Oberon,

    As for Fauna: This is the first place I saw a Wombat (first picture) and an Echidna (second picture) in Australia. Both I think are just so cute! Unfortunately the pics are not very good. My apologies. I would really like to go back and make a picture of the long nose of the Echidna.

    It pays off to drive slowly and keep your eyes open! And of course, donßt do as I do and keep your camera ready ... or you will only see the backs of the animals...

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    Squeaky Bay

    by Myndo Written May 9, 2006

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    Squeky Bay, Wilsons Prom

    One Bay further south from Picnic Bay, this one is more sandy, but still has the stone formations, though not so many and mostly bigger ones.

    The picture shows the bay from the way up to Mt. Oberon, the weather was not warm enough for us to have a swim, but the park has a lot more to offer, such as really excellent walks and hikes.

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    Picnic Bay

    by Myndo Updated May 9, 2006

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    Picnic Bay, Wilsons Promontory

    Picnic Bay in the west of the Park is a beach with round stone formations.
    It looks as if someone did throw bubbles on it.

    There is not enough sand between the stones to make it a swimming beach, but for a Pic Nic and Picture spot, it was just perfect.

    Also I heard it is a good place for snorkeling

    If you want to have a beach day, I would say, go to the tidal river: a sandy place.

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    A DAY AT THE PROM VII

    by iandsmith Updated Feb 8, 2006

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    Putting temptation in his way

    Thus sated mentally we crossed the headland to Tidal River and the kiosk where the more material sating could commence....................except...............I forgot my wallet!
    Penniless and using my selling skills to the nth degree, I talked my way past the female proprietor, being careful to blame Rosemarie for not reminding me to bring aforesaid wallet.
    The lady duly recorded my name and telephone number (not, unfortunately, for a moonlight dalliance) and then handed over the sustenance and we repaired to tables outside.
    It was only seconds, or fractions thereof, before crimson rosellas gatecrashed our feast. Putting temptation in their way I left the enwrapped-in-gladwrap banana cake beside my hand as the bird sought to tear strips off it, an activity I quickly discouraged with a 'Golly gosh, don't do that you lovely creature". Okay, maybe there were an expletive deleted or two in there somewhere.
    On our return journey we again soaked up the autumn sun as we crossed the famous Tidal River where Rosemarie's father used to fish, though its fame was not derived from his activities. (CONTINUED)

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