Exmouth Off The Beaten Path

  • Lots of star fish in the water
    Lots of star fish in the water
    by Purpleshade
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by Purpleshade
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by Purpleshade

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Exmouth

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    South Mando Beach

    by Purpleshade Updated May 28, 2008

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    Another beautiful beach for swimming and snorkeling, just a bit further on than The Oyster Stacks.
    Access to the beach is via a 500 meter track through the dunes/bush, a delightful little stroll where you are likely to see all sorts of flora and fauna, with beautiful views across the bay.
    The beach is sandy and the reef only about 20 meters from the shore.
    As at Oyster Stacks, the water is too low over the corals for snorkeling at low tide, but you can walk out to the edge of the reef and see it without swimming.

    This beach also houses the Eco-resort, fully equipped permanent tents for rent on the dunes very close to the beach, the only accommodation for hire in the park.

    Related to:
    • Diving and Snorkeling
    • Beaches
    • Sailing and Boating

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    Jantz beach and turtle rookeries.

    by Purpleshade Updated May 28, 2008

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    Turtle rookeries
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    Jantz beach has lovely sand and is a good swimming beach, situated just before you enter the Cape National Park.
    The dunes contain the 'turtle rookeries' where the turtles come to lay their eggs in early summer.
    The turtle center just before the turning tells you all about them.
    My friends brought their catamaran here to sail, but would not do it during the turtles' breeding season as it may squash the eggs and baby turtles.
    As this beach is not within the national park, dogs are permitted except during the turtle's breeding season, and it is not illegal to collect shells and coral.

    The reef is not easily accessible from this beach.

    Related to:
    • Whale Watching
    • Beaches
    • Diving and Snorkeling

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    Birdwatching hide and mangrooves

    by Purpleshade Updated May 14, 2008

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    The hide.
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    The road to the birdwatching hide is the first turning on the right after entering the Cape Range National Park.
    It's a short distance along a board walk through mangrooves. Displays inside the hide show what birds you are likely to see.

    Related to:
    • Birdwatching

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    Drive to Turqouise Bay and snorkel on the reef.

    by Purpleshade Updated May 14, 2008

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    Preparing to snorkel for the first time.
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    Turquoise bay is about 40 minutes drive from the town in the middle of the Cape Range National Park, so called because of the exceptional turquoise blue colour of the water.
    There is a tar sealed road through the park and a good unsealed raod and carpark to access the beach.
    The reef is in shallow water only about 30 metres from the shore line so is suitable for those who are not strong swimmers and are unhappy swimming in deep water.
    Fish are varied and plentiful, including starfish, sea cucumbers, turtles, manta rays and reef sharks at different times of the year.
    You can drift in the current from one end of the bay to the other over the reef with very little effort (you don't really need fins as the current will carry you).
    Certain precautions are necessary to avoid getting dragged through the gap at the end of the reef, but this is clearly explained at the entrance to the beach. If you feel unsure, ask the the visitors centre which you pass on the way before you go the beach.

    There are no facilities apart from 'bush toilets' at this beach, no shop, no water, no shade. You have to bring everything you need (don't forget sunblock).

    PLEASE PROTECT THE REEF, DO NOT TOUCH OR STAND ON THE CORALS, DO NOT LEAVE RUBBISH ON THE BEACH.

    This beach is narrow and often crowded in high season, but the reef is accessible no matter whether the tide is high or low.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Diving and Snorkeling
    • Beaches

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    The visitors centre.

    by Purpleshade Updated May 14, 2008

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    A preserved turtle that was damaged by a boat
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    The visitors centre in the Cape Range National park has many items of interest about the local area. There's a large range of information about flora and fauna including a reading room, displays and video shows.

    The shop has a large range of gifts at reasonable prices and also sells drinks and ice-creams.

    There is no air-con here, no-where to fill your waterbottle (unless you pay for bottled water) and only bush toilets.

    There's often kangaroos just outside.

    Open 9:00am to 3:45 pm

    Related to:
    • Whale Watching
    • Beaches
    • Diving and Snorkeling

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    Oyster Stacks, the coral reef for non-snorkellers.

    by Purpleshade Updated May 13, 2008

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    The Oyster stacks
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    This stunning part of the reef is my favourite. It's just about an hour's drive from Exmouth through the Cape park.
    There's a good road and car-park, but no facilities apart from a bush toilet.
    The beach is rocky with not much sand, and the reef begins almost as soon as you get in the water. At low tide, you can walk between the clumps of and coral and see them in water only up to your knees.

    TAKE CARE TO PROTECT THE CORALS, DO NOT TOUCH THEM OR STAND ON THEM.
    SNORKELLING IS NOT RECOMMANED AT LOW TIDE BECUSE THERE IS NOT ENOUGH DEPTH OF WATER TO CLEAR THE CORALS.
    As well as damaging the corals if you touch them, they can cause nasty injuries as some of them are poisonous as well as sharp.

    But when the tide is more than 1/2 in, it's excellent for beginners who feel unhappy swimming out of their depth. There's spaces between the corals where you can put your feet down and have a rest.
    Close to the 3 sacks which you can see in the photo, it's absolutely teeming with fish, even more so than at Turquiose Bay. My friend who is more experienced at snorkelling and swam out a little deeper saw a small carpet shark, and there were lots of baby sting rays along the shore line further down the beach. And of course there are lots and lots of the giant clams which give it it's name.

    Don't forget to bring water, sunblock and your reef shoes as well as snorkelling gear.

    I saw many of the fish and corals in this video less than 20 metres from the shore, but in real life they are far more brilliantly coloured.
    http://video.aol.com/video-detail/snorkelling-in-exmouth-gulf-western-australia/1398606948

    Related to:
    • Diving and Snorkeling
    • Beaches
    • Sailing and Boating

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    Driving up to Exmouth.

    by Openseas Written Sep 16, 2007

    If you have hired a car from Learmouth Airport then I highly recommend you drive into Exmouth and check-out the town and then head north up to the lighthouse. The view is absolutely terrific and one feels totally alone in a huge beautiful and wild desolated country.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Adventure Travel
    • Beaches

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    4WD required.

    by Openseas Written Sep 16, 2007

    If you want to do a little exploring, then remember you are in the Desert and all roads off the beaten track are sand which require a 4WD.

    Don't be fooled, by the hard sand, it soon turns into soft sand and you can be stranded in 40 degree heat with NO mobile coverage and NO cars passing you.

    So DO NOT TAKE RISKS !

    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • National/State Park
    • Road Trip

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    Visit Coral Bay

    by Purpleshade Updated Jun 16, 2007

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    Friendly fish in the lagoon
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    Coral bay is a tiny little place, just a few houses, tourist accomodation and a beautiful bay with a coral reef about 50 metres off shore.
    Lots of tourist boats go out from here for snorkeling, viewing the coral in glass bottomed boats, and whale, manta ray and turtle watching(in season).
    There is a very small shopping centre, a few tourist shops and a couple of cafes.
    Snorkelling equipment, 4 wheeled buggies and sea kayaks can be hired.

    Related to:
    • Whale Watching
    • Beaches
    • Diving and Snorkeling

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  • Rachel333's Profile Photo

    exmouth beach scene

    by Rachel333 Updated Dec 6, 2004

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    The beaches are expansive and seemingly untouched. The sand is sqeaky clean and the ocean......incredibly refreshing.

    Related to:
    • Beaches

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Exmouth Off The Beaten Path

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