Greenough Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by balhannah
  • Things to Do
    by balhannah
  • St. Peter's Church
    St. Peter's Church
    by balhannah

Most Recent Things to Do in Greenough

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    GREENOUGH/WALKAWAY HERITAGE TRAIL

    by balhannah Updated Jan 10, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    When I was in the Geraldton visitor centre, I picked up the FREE booklet "Greenough/Walkaway Heritage trail." I knew we would be going there and on flicking through this booklet I could see it would be quite helpful, which it was.

    THIS IS NOT A WALKING TRAIL - IT IS A DRIVING TRAIL

    The Greenough/Walkaway Heritage Trail is a 57km drive that took us to the settlement of Greenough and around the back roads where some old buildings and structures are still standing. Altogether, there are over 30 sites to see, so allow a full day to do the tour, this gives time for lunch perhaps at the Hampton Arms Inn.

    The trail begins at the GREENOUGH PIONEER MUSEUM on Phillips Road off Brand Highway, and ends at Ellendale Pool where we stayed the night. It is an interesting and scenic trail to follow as this area has the "leaning trees" and wonderful pasture and crop land. All we had to do was follow the trail route map and look for signs bearing the Heritage Trails Network symbol.

    IF YOU HAVE A CAR - DO IT!

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel
    • Motorcycle

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    CLINCH'S MILL

    by balhannah Written Jan 10, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Clinch's Mill looked to be in quite good condtion, only there was no way of getting close as it's on private property and MUST be viewed from the road.

    When this Mill was first built in 1858, it was only a single storey building built from local sandstone. Originally the Mill was owned by Edward Whitfield who in 1869, sold it to Thomas Clinch, who quickly went about renovating the Mill, eventually making it a massive three stories high. He added rooms and then built a home for himself and cottages nearby for his workmen. He then began producing flour using a horse driven mill stone.

    Clinch's mill Clinch's Mill
    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    FIELDS OF LUPINS

    by balhannah Written Jan 10, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Lupins, I have grown them in my garden and I have seen them growing wild in Europe and the U.S.A, but I had never seen them being cultivated! Well, these aren't the Lupins I grew in my garden, these are different.

    In the area around Geraldton, we had seen many large paddocks of Lupins growing in different colours. Eventually, curiosity got the better of me and we stopped for a photo, then asked at an information centre. The lovely lady gave me some information sheets to keep, as I was rather interested in the Lupin, have never seen Lupins grown like this before.

    Evidently, Lupins grow extremely well in the sandy Western Australian soils, in fact so well, that Western Australia produces about 80% of world production and is the world’s leading lupin producer.
    The Lupin is part of the legume family that includes soy beans, peas and lentils etc. Lupins are the world’s richest natural source of protein (40%) and fibre (37%). The Lupin has a lot of wonderful benefits including being cholesterol free and are a great alternative for people with Coeliac disease or following a gluten-free diet

    If you want to know more, then check out the website, it really is quite interesting.

    Lupins being farmed
    Related to:
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    HAMPTON ARMS INN

    by balhannah Written Jan 10, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Hampton Arms Inn is a two-storey stone and iron building with single-storey wings each side of the main section and a stone stable block. As it's an excellent example of the Victorian Regency style, it's listed on the National Trust heritage register. The Hotel was named after John Hampton, the Governor at that time.

    It is one of a few buildings from the village of Hampton which has survived. The village was established in 1862 and the Hotel opened in 1863. It was the district's first hotel, so of course it was very popular, somewhere for a Beer after a hard days work, a chance for the ladies to dress up to attend a social gathering or Ball being held here, and place where important meetings were held. Fun in those days was very different to today!
    In 1868, a ploughing match was held adjacent to the hotel and for several decades it was a centre of social life. The 1870s, and this area experienced a series of droughts, floods and fires causing a decline in patronage at the Hampton Arms Inn.

    The Hotel closed in the 1890s and was used as a farmhouse until it was bought in 1978 by Judy and Brian Turnock, who over 16 years have been restoring it. A restaurant was opened and the ballroom completed and now you can come to this Pub and enjoy a meal, a beer or wine, afternoon or morning tea and even stay the night in their accommodation.

    All information on this can be found on the Hampton Arms website.

    The Hampton Arms is CLOSED ON MONDAYS
    OPEN Tuesday - Saturday 10 - 5pm Lunch 11.30am - 2 pm
    Sundays 12noon - 4.30pm Lunch 12 noon - 2.15pm

    The Hampton Inn
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    TEMPERANCE LODGE

    by balhannah Written Jan 10, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Temperance Lodge is a shell of a building. It was the "new" hall constructed in 1898, taking the place of St. Catherine's Hall which I saw in the Greenough Historical village. In 1870, the Society of Good Templers were given this land by Fredrick Waldeck to build the new hall. It then was used for meetings, social gatherings and other entertainment, but you had to enjoy yourself with-out any alcohol! As no alcohol was allowed, the Lodge became known as "The certainly not."

    Temperance Lodge.
    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    GRAY'S STORE

    by balhannah Written Jan 10, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    A little further along from Wesley Chapel was Gray's Store. Located on a cross -road, I imagine this was a pretty busy intersection in the 1800's when horse and drays plied the roads with settlers coming here for their supplies. Today, it was so quiet as we were the only ones here!

    The heritage listed store was another constructed by "ticket of leave Convict labour," and another that has stood the test of time. It was built for Henry Gray, hence the name "Gray's Store." He was a land-owner as well as an import-export merchant, so most of his stock came by sailing ship which docked at the nearby town of Dongara. He lived in the two storey residence which was surrounded by a walled garden and attached to the store. In 1890, Mr Gray sold the store, from then until the 1950's, it was used as a residence. In 1975, fire badly damaged the building, so now the National trust will go about restoring it.
    Perhaps one day, it will be open for us to see once again!

    Gray's store
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    MALEY'S BRIDGE, STONE COTTAGE & BARN

    by balhannah Updated Jan 10, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    As with many of the first Settlers, they had to be able to put their hands to many trades to be able to succeed. John Maley, whose cottage we had previously visited, was the architect for our next site, a convict built bridge.
    Built in 1864, it supports were made from the local limestone by "ticket of leave convicts." These were convicts who were allowed out to do work like this as their behaviour was good in prison. The bridge was being repaired when I was there.
    Near the bridge, was a stone barn, also thought to be built by "ticket of leave convict labour" around the same time. This building has been used since then for horse stables and as a shearing shed.
    As with all the properties in this area and on the heritage trail, they are all classified by the National trust.

    Maley's Bridge
    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    WESLEY CHAPEL

    by balhannah Updated Jan 10, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Our heritage trail took us to see the gothic style Wesley chapel built in 1867 by "ticket of leave convict labour." As usual of old buildings in this area, it was built out of limestone and is still standing. A new roof has been added, but the windows still have corrugated iron covering them. Evidently, the old windows have been missing since the 1950's, where they have gone is a good question? Many believe they were buried during the war for safe -keeping. I hope they find them as they were Waldeck family memorial windows.

    Joshua Waldeck was the first to be married in this church, he was in such a hurry, he didn't wait for the Church to be completed! I saw photos of him and his family in the Greenough historical museum. Also in the museum, is the bridal veil worn by his daughter, "Maude Florence Waldeck " at the Wesley Chapel in 1905, on the occasion of her marriage.

    This Methodist Church played an important role for the early settlers. It gave them faith and was a place where the community met and events were held.

    This Church is on the Greenough Heritage trail and also the beginning of the Swan River heritage trail.

    Wesley Chapel
    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    GREENOUGH PIONEER MUSEUM

    by balhannah Updated Jan 10, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    We were heading south from Geraldton when we saw the brown tourist sign to the Greenough Pioneer museum, the notice we were looking for as this Museum is the BEGINNING OF THE GREENOUGH HERITAGE TRAIL.
    Located not far from the Brand Highway was the Museum thast was once known as Home Cottage when built by convicts from Port Gregory in 1862. It was John Maley, his wife and family of 14 children who lived in the homestead between 1862 and 1880. His wife was the daughter of the first German migrants who came and settled in Western Australia, in fact, this area is where all the first migrants came and settled in Western Australia.

    A cottage garden and a large old Pepper tree were in the front garden of the 11 room homestead. The Pepper tree is not an Australian native, it comes from an arid zone in South America. Pepper trees were obviously brought to Australia by the early settlers who settled in the eastern states of Australia in the 1870s. This Pepper tree was brought here 1876 by Baron Von Muelier who was a friend of John Maley. It is thought this may possibly be the 1st Pepper tree in Western Australia.

    We entered through the front door to where some volunteers were working, they were happy to have a chat to us and about the history of the house before setting us in the right direction with a fact sheet of what we would see.

    This house has many original furnishings, musical instruments, clothing, toys, hand made lace work and the every day items used in running the homestead. Outside are sheds where farm machinery and other old pieces are on display and we could go down the cellar.
    It was interesting what I saw, but in my opinion, nowhere near as interesting as many I have seen. At least it wasn't expensive, so for what we paid it was worth it!

    Pioneer Museum fact sheets are also available in German, French, Italian, Dutch, Russian and Japanese.

    Open daily 9.30am to 3.30pm except Tuesdays and Wednesdays.
    Admission Adults $5
    (Buy the "Museum Pass" to 3 historical places from the Geraldton Visitor Centre and save!)

    Entrance Old Pepper Tree Old Organ House kitchen Maley's Cottage
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Seniors
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    MALEY'S MILL

    by balhannah Updated Jan 10, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Maley's Mill is located on 50 acres of land and IS NOT OPEN TO THE PUBLIC.

    The big old stone building was built between 1860 - 1863 and used as a flour mill and general store. The Mills owners were Cook & Maley, Maley lived next door in the cottage.
    Back in history, when this was first established, there were many other buildings near this mill, all of those have long gone. The Mill operated as a mill until 1891, now it is used as a shearing shed. The Olive trees that were planted over 100 years ago are still alive and doing well.

    Maley's Mill
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    THE OLD COTTAGES

    by balhannah Written Jan 10, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There were a few old cottages at the Greenough historical site.

    One of them was "Goodwins" cottage. a four roomed stone building with a front verandah built by the Catholic church as a home for retired Policeman, "Ned Goodwin." He and his wife lived here until Ned died in 1912, then the Church took over the building again and converted it to a school where the Presentation Nuns schooled the children.

    Another Cottage is known as "Hackett's" cottage. This cottage dates to 1888 and has been extended several times. There was once an adjoining store which Ned ran, this has long since gone. Ned was a very busy man, as not only was he running the store, but he was the community Undertaker, Carpenter, Blacksmith and Cobbler, he sure could multi-task!

    There are some other cottages, all which you are able to enter and have a look around. Some have more furniture than others, but all have an sign beside each with the history on each home.

    Greenough historical village cottage Greenough historical village cottage Greenough historical village Greenough historical village Greenough historical village
    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    GREENOUGH POLICE STATION & GAOL

    by balhannah Written Jan 10, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Police Station and Gaol would be the largest building left standing in the Greenough Historic settlement.
    This white limestone building once housed the court house, constructed in 1867, the police station and gaol built in 1870 and the Telegraph & Post office built in 1873. Lucky the building was huge as it was used as a place to stay by the visiting Doctor, the School teacher, the Police Sergeant and the Magistrates. It had a kitchen where meals were prepared for the Prisoners. I found their cell blocks and read with interest, whites and blacks were kept apart. Four cells were for the "white" prisoners, either one or two people to a cell, and the Aboriginals were put in the larger 5th cell where they were chained to an iron bar. A small enclosed yard was where the prisoners exercised.

    Out the back I found quite a large area where the horses would have been stabled and an old well and some Tamarisk trees. The high stone wall surrounded the whole house and the stables.
    This building was used for quite a number of years as Government offices.

    Police Station and Gaol Police Station and Gaol Police Station and Gaol Police Station and Gaol Police Station and Gaol
    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    RELIGIOUS BUILDINGS IN THE HISTORICAL VILLAGE

    by balhannah Written Jan 9, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Located in what is left of Greenough, are all stone buildings which include two churches, a convent, presbytery, school, courthouse, goal and community hall. Some of these buildings are still used today.

    The original St. Catherine's Church was shipped out from England and rebuilt here, this was replaced in 1913. Nearby, is St Catherine's Hall where country dances are held.

    Across the road was St. Peter's Catholic Church and some old convent buildings and the Presbytery.
    The Presbytery was built in 1900 for the local catholic priest who lived here for 30 years. Monsignor John Hawes, whose Churches I had been seeing all around Western Australia, was the last priest to reside here.
    St Peter's church and church bell was damaged by floodwaters in 1888 and was rebuilt using some of the original stones and the Church bell was placed outside the new Church. St. Peter's Church is still used for worship.

    The Dominican Sisters ran a mixed day school in the Convent built in 1898.

    St. Peters Church St. Peter's Church St. Catherine's Church Church hall
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Religious Travel
    • Museum Visits

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    GREENOUGH HISTORIC SETTLEMENT

    by balhannah Written Jan 9, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is what we actually came to see at Greenough, the remains of the once thriving village of Greenough.
    It is easy to find when travelling the Brand highway between Perth and Geraldton, just look for the Brown Tourist signs around the 20km mark from Geraldton.
    We pulled into a large car-park where the Greenough Cafe & Visitor Centre is located, this is where I paid my entrance fee and entered the historic area through the shop. The shop had quite a lot of souvenirs for sale.
    The village has 11 stone buildings that can be looked through, each has some original furniture. Grazing on the lush green grass were either Alpacas or Llamas, I'm not sure which. One looked rather cranky so I kept clear of him!

    THE VILLAGE BELONGS TO THE NATIOINAL TRUST IS OPEN
    Mon - Saturday 9 - 4pm
    Opening hours on public holidays and in February are 10am - 4pm

    ADMISSION
    Adult - $5/person.
    Child - $3/person.
    Concession - $4/person.
    Family - $12/2 adults, 2 children.
    Members - FREE.

    Greenough is 4.5 hour drive north of Perth.

    Greenough historical village Greenough historic settlement Greenough historical village Greenough historical village
    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    THE LEANING TREES OF GREENOUGH

    by balhannah Written Jan 9, 2015

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I have mentioned earlier on my trip around Western Australia about the strong winds along the Western Australian Coast. Just in-case you didn't believe me, then I have some photos to confirm it. These photos were taken from the Brand Highway which we followed to Greenough.
    The harsh environment, and the super strong and salty southerly winds that come in off the Indian Ocean burn off the growth on the windward side and cause the trees trunks to grow horizontal to the ground.
    I could only view from the fence line as these trees are located on private property. There is a proper pull-off to make it safe for people like me who like to take a photo and some information about the trees.

    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Road Trip
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Greenough

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

34 travelers online now

Comments

Greenough Travel Guide

Greenough Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Greenough things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Greenough sightseeing.

View all Greenough hotels