Kalbarri Things to Do

  • From the overlook where the bus stopped
    From the overlook where the bus stopped
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  • Things to Do
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  • The Murchison River from the overlook
    The Murchison River from the overlook
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Most Recent Things to Do in Kalbarri

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    Whales and Sandstone Arches

    by DEBBBEDB Written Aug 2, 2012

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    Sandstone arch from above
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    One of the stops allowed us to walk down and see the arches carved out of the sandstone by the sea. I think this is similar to the ones my cousin saw in Hawaii, and the ones that used to be in Aruba. We also saw some whales but I didn't get a picture because someone put his camera in front of mine just as I was taking a picture.

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    Wildflowers

    by DEBBBEDB Written Aug 2, 2012

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    Even in the Australian winter there are wildflowers in the park. There would have been more if we had visited a little later toward the spring, but even when we visited there were some very unusual and pretty ones.

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    Sandstone Formations

    by DEBBBEDB Written Aug 2, 2012

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    The Murchison River
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    Our guide said the Murchison River was a few million years old and carve a massive gorge through the park. Our guide compared this to the Grand Canyon. It's very pretty, but it is no Grand Canyon.

    I walked down to the overlook and took photos of the river and sandstone formations

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    Creatures of the day and night

    by iandsmith Updated Apr 19, 2010

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    Arachnaphobics please turn away
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    It often surprises me that when people go into the Australian outback they don't really think that maybe other forms of life live there.
    Far and away the most abundant at Kalbarri National Park are the flies and, where you have flies, you have things that eat them.
    Spiders proliferate (pics 1 & 3) and there are many small birds as well, such as the beautiful red capped robin (pic 2) and zebra finches (4)

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    The Highlight

    by iandsmith Updated Aug 24, 2008

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    Start of the walk
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    For me, the best part of Kalbarri is the coastal walks and the pick of them is Mushroom Rocks Walk.
    If you're not into geology then some of the walk may be lost on you but it's only an hour and a half (you could do it in a lot less than that) and you'll see some of the most stunning formations you're likely to see in W.A.

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    Natural Bridge

    by iandsmith Updated Aug 24, 2008

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    Worth a look
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    Here is a formation you can see at a few places around the Australian coastline.
    Also, if you look closely, you can see where the top layer of Tamala limestone that was put down a mere 2 million years ago, has collapsed and fallen into the ocean.

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    The pelicans

    by iandsmith Written Aug 24, 2008

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    Might as well get spruced up before breakfast

    For over a decade local volunteers have been feeding the pelicans at the Pelican Corral in Kalbarri. Spectators are given a brief history of these wonderful birds, though I have to say that, since I was more or less brought up with them, they didn't get me as excited as some others.
    Feeding time is normally 8.45am but check the signs as feeding is not practical at certain times of the year.

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    The Skolithos connection

    by iandsmith Updated Aug 24, 2008

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    Signs of ancient life
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    I was already in awe of this walk when we came upon these weird formations hanging everywhere off the end of the rock.
    They are actually caused by a worm like creature called a skolithos and it may have taken minutes to hours to form these burrows.
    Due to some matter excreted by them the surrounding sand became hard and their shapes have lasted beyond the softer sandstone.
    Formed during the Silurian period around 420 million years ago they are worth the walk on their own.
    I'd never seen anything like it.

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    The amazing landscape

    by iandsmith Written Aug 24, 2008

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    Nature's art
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    Formed over thousand of years due to the erosion or Tumblagooda sandstone, the reason I had picked this walk out was the layers of colour. I hope you agree as you check the pictures out that they alone make the walk worthwhile. Frankly, I'd never seen anything like it.

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    Where the Murchison flows

    by iandsmith Written Aug 24, 2008

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    The Murchison River
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    The whole gorge only happened because the Murchison River flows right through these ancient layers.
    The access via the loop walk (see pic 5) is easy but it is uphill and downhill and takes and estimated 3-4 hours for the eight kilometres.
    It's extraordinary to realise that the aptly named Loop almost does a full 360 turn.
    I have to say that I deliberately came here first because I'd heard that Karijini was better. Speaking personally, I agree with those who told me that. Karijini isn't better, it's much better.

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    The essential shot

    by iandsmith Updated Aug 24, 2008

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    The magnetically attracting rock
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    When you reach the Loop there is one photo that everyone must have and that is the one of Nature's Window, a weather worn hole in a rock right next to the carpark where you take the plunge down into the gorge.
    It's a large hole in the Tumblagooda sandstone walls that were formed about 400-500 million years ago, just before I was born.
    As recorded elsewhere, it's not as big as you might think but let that not detract from its attractiveness.

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    The Kalbarri file

    by iandsmith Written Aug 24, 2008

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    Flora of the region
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    Kalbarri National Park is one of the better National Parks in Australia. The combination of nearly 200 000 hectares which, between August and October, becomes a vast carpet of wildflowers, the elaborate and interesting twists and turns of the Murchison River as it cuts its way to the sea.
    First contact with the park (for those people travelling west from the North West Coastal Highway) is the virgin bushland beside the road which, while sometimes dull, turns into a wonderland of wildflowers (particularly banksia) in the spring. The thing which impresses every motorist is the sheer scale of the bushlands. There is literally over 50 km of roadway with wildflowers on either side but the roughness of the roads may mean you can't concentrate on the flowers unless you pull up.

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    Early days

    by iandsmith Written Aug 24, 2008

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    Looking back to Kalbarri from Red Bluff

    Amazingly, though ships had traversed the coastline for centuries, it was only in 1951 that this place came into existence.
    How many notorious shipwrecks, mutinies, executions and punishments took place we may never know but the most famous is certainly the Batavia on the Houtman Abrolhos in 1629.
    Two of the mutineers, Wouter Loos and Jan Pelgrom, were marooned on the mainland somewhere near the modern day site of Kalbarri - they had the unhappy distinction of becoming Australia's first white settlers.
    In 1712 a Dutch ship named the Zuytdorp was wrecked on a reef north of Kalbarri with possibly a bullion of 100 000 guilders and pieces of eight as cargo.
    In 1839 Lieutenant George Grey, attempting to explore North West Cape, was shipwrecked near the mouth of the Murchison River.
    With no other option he walked back to Perth and thus became the first white man to explorer to travel along the coastal strip of the Central West.
    The area had scattered settlements through the late nineteenth and early twentieth century, mainly miners and fishermen. In 1848 the Geraldine lead mine was opened up.

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    Blue and Gold Macaw

    by keeweechic Updated Jan 31, 2008

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    A fairly large bird, they are popular as a pet because of their ability to talk or at times just scream loudly. These birds can have a life span up to 60years. The mate that they have is usually for life.

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    Scaly Breasted lorikeet

    by keeweechic Written Jan 30, 2008

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    This lorikeet is found in the woodlands of eastern Australia. It is also known as the green lorikeet or parrot. When feeding, they will produce a high-pitched chatter. They feed mainly on pollen and nectar and also fruit and seeds

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Kalbarri Things to Do

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