Unique Places in State of Western Australia

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Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in State of Western Australia

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    Wildflowers and a Wave at the Rock

    by tropicrd Written Oct 13, 2013

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    Look out for the wildflowers poking out of rocks and crevices and the sandy soil in this area around Wave Rock at Hyden.
    They are so beautiful..don't forget your camera..best time to visit is Australia's spring September to November.Take the loop walk to Hippos Yawn and then follow the track back to the car park..look out for the delicate orchids.
    Remember it is against the law to pick wildflowers so take your camera and start shooting you will be amazed at how many pics you take.

    Pretty as a picture Delicate wildflower I think these are wild freesiers !! A splash of colour Looks like a log man..on the track.
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    Explore the back roads without a map

    by tropicrd Written Oct 12, 2013

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    One of the great fun things to do in Australia or in this case Western Australia is to go on a road trip and explore the areas without a road map.
    I loved some of the roads our tag a long group went on and although the hosts had it all planned it was still wonderful to experience. Just follow the road signs and no doubt you will have the time of your life. I love taking pictures of long long roads.
    So let your imagination take hold and your travel spirit rise and drive these amazing roads to somewhere or nowhere, you can always go back the way you came if you think you are lost. Most of the back roads are good to drive on,so you won't need a 4x4 unless you go onto the bush tracks.

    The long long road to somewhere A bush road Straight and long Which way ? Follow the sign posts Plenty of room to park
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    Croc Creek

    by iandsmith Written Feb 2, 2012

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    One of the more magical places we visited on our Kimberley Cruise was Croc Creek; or, more specifically, the swimming hole at the head of the creek.
    It's a wonderful spot, often visited by yachties as evidenced by the stuff hanging from the shelter here.
    The swimming holes (there's another above the main pool) offer delightful freshwater bathing in surroundings as colourful as you'll find anywhere.

    The main swimming hole Colours of the creek The lower falls beneath the swimming hole Roof of the shed and its memorabilia
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    Golden ghosts

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated May 8, 2011

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    Siberia and Ora Banda are just two of the many ghost towns that can be found scattered around the Eastern Goldfields region that centres on Kalgoorlie, 600km east of Perth.

    All were founded in the heady days of the Western Australian goldrush of the 1890s. Some, like Siberia, gazetted as a township in 1898, have no buildings at all to show that once there was a sizable town here, with two hotels, a hospital and its own doctor. The first gold was found here in October 1893 and soon several mines were operating. Land for a townsite to be named to be named either Waverley or Siberia was set aside. The locals chose Siberia, taking the name from Siberia Tank, a nearby water supply for the area. No-one really knows quite why such a hot place was named thus but the story goes "A swagman struck the track near here and cut on a tree the words: To Hell or Siberia."

    Ora Banda (Spanish for 'Band of Gold") has more to show for its 100 year history - the solidly built sandstone pub is still open for business and although little else remains a story board tells visitors something of the town's history. As with Siberia, gold was found here in 1893 and by 1910 2000 people were living here, with a police station, post office, school and Catholic church just some of the amenities of the town. Thanks to some good "shows" (finds of gold seams) the mine remained open until the 1970s.

    Siberia is 80km from Kalgoorlie , Ora Banda is closer, 66 km from town .

    Siberia Ora Banda pub The story of Ora Banda Old Ora Banda
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    Ghosts of steam and timber

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The sense of times past at the old Yarloop Workshops (125km south of Perth, signposted off the main highways to Bunbury) is palpable. As you walk through the complex of sheds and workshops you would swear the knock-off whistle had just blown and the men who once worked here had all just left. It's nearly 30 years since the workshops closed down though, and the wonderful collection of steamdriven engines housed here only fire up for the steam days held here from March to November (2nd Sunday of the month). The workshops themselves are open daily from 10-4 .

    The great forests of WA's south-west yield magnificent timber and there was once a whole network of railway lines that serviced the timber mills that operated throughout the region. Whilst most of the engines and milling machinery came from England, the industry depended on the workshops to keep them running as well as to build and adapt others. The Yarloop complex , with its stores and sheds, forge and workshops - all still full of tools, machines, patterns, huge whim wheels - everything that needed to keep the mills working, is a fascinating place. There is even the lending library that provided the men and their families with access to literature and learning. This is industrial archaeology at its best.

    The knock-off whistle has just blown
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    Bush riding "Down South"

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    A really great way to see the bush is to take a ride through it, and there's nowhere better to do this than on Cape Naturaliste. A bush ride will take you across ridges with wonderful views out to sea, down deep gullies filled with wildflowers, and perhaps even onto the beach. You don't have to be an experienced rider and you will get a fantastic feel for the bush. Go early in the morning or for a twilight ride and you may see even kangaroos.

    Beach ride
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    The perfect beach?

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Meelup Beach, a few kilometres out of Dunsborough on the Cape Naturaliste Road is without a doubt one of the most beautiful beaches you will ever see. The forest comes right down to a crescent of fine, white sand; the sheltered, brilliant turquoise water always seems to be the right temperature for swimming; there's shady grass for picnicking on, barbecues to cook on (watch out for thieving kookaburras) or you can walk up through the bush to a nearby vineyard for a leisurely lunch; and for those feeling like a little more exercise there is an excellent bush trail, the Meelup Coastal Track.

    Meelup Beach
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    The Valley of the Giants Tree Top Walk

    by aramat Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Valley of the Giants is part of Walpole-Nornalup National Park in the southert part of WA, 15 km from Walpole.

    The Tree Top Walk is a 420m long steel-truss elevated walkway which leads over the canopy of the red tingle forest. It is built on the side of a natural valley, so it's not steep, still the highest point is about 40m above the ground.

    The Tree Top Walk
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    Swanbourne Beach in Perth

    by elwood_6112 Updated Apr 4, 2011

    It is the locals nude beach. Perth beaches are beautiful, and this one is no exception. You just go and sit, take your clothes off, do whatever you want. No-one cares, so why should you? Plus it is right near the city, and there are cafe's and restaurants nearby. You feel stupid the first time you go, then you just want to go back all the time.
    It was our local beach, and now we are in Seattle we are really going to miss it.
    I would put in a pic, but my wife wouldnt like it!

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    Walpole

    by windsorgirl Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    There are many easy walks through the Tingle forest near Walpole. One will take you to the giant Tingle Tree where you may spot a kookaburra along the way.

    Walpole is located 423 kms southeast of Perth in the heart of the Walpole-Nornalup National Park.

    Kookaburra, Walpole
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    The Golden Mile

    by TheWanderingCamel Updated Mar 18, 2011

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    The historic and important gold-mining twin city of Kalgoorlie-Boulder is a 600km drive from Perth - which does put it out of the reach of lots of visitors. One sight not to be missed by those who do make it this far however is the lookout over the massive mining operation known as the Super Pit. This vast open-cut gold mining operation is the result of the bringing together of all the individual gold-mines that once operated along what was once the "Golden Mile" that had been in operation for the 100 years since Paddy Hannan first discovered gold here in 1893. Since then over 50 million ounces of gold have been taked from this one small strip of land - one of only 4 mines in the world to have yielded such riches. The single pit that we see today is 3 km long, 1.5 km wide and nearly 400 metres deep. It is fully expected to be 600 metres deep within the next few years.

    Operating around the clock, the pit itself is hardly tourist territory but you can get an excellent overview from the lookout. It is an amazing sight with huge trucks looking like tiny toys as they inch their way down the terraces. It all becomes even more dramatic at night as work continues under a blaze of lights.

    Short of flying over it, the only way you'll get a shot of the whole pit is to do as I've done here - take a photo of one of the display boards.

    Address: Hainault Road, off the Goldfields Highway - it's very well sign-posted

    The Lookout is open daily 7.00 a.m. - 9.00 p.m. Temporary closure may occur during mine blasts

    Super Pit Down, down... Paddy Hannan
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    Geikie Gorge

    by iandsmith Updated Jul 25, 2010

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    Geikie Gorge National Park is the most easily accessible national park in the Kimberley.
    It's only 20 km outside the small Kimberley town Fitzroy Crossing, and you don't even have to leave the bitumen to get to the gorge.
    (It's a 280 km drive from Derby and 390 km from Broome.)
    Geikie Gorge is situated at the junction of the Oscar and the Geikie Ranges. The mighty Fitzroy River has carved a 30 metre deep gorge into the remains of the ancient limestone barrier reef that existed here in the Devonian period.
    When the Fitzroy is in full flood during the wet season it covers the whole national park. Those floods rise over 16 metres up the gorge walls and the continuous rise and fall of the water has left the bottom of the walls bleached white, an intriguing sight which makes Geikie Gorge very popular with photographers.
    It's not as deep as many others in northern W.A. and there are two types of cruises to choose from when you get there but there is no camping in the immediate area.

    What people go up north to see Remnants of an ancient landscape Devonian era stone Darter drying himself
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    80 Mile Beach

    by iandsmith Written Feb 1, 2010

    We came, we saw, we stayed and we still couldn't work out why people loved coming to this place.
    We guessed it might be the social aspect, perhaps the fishing but, we still couldn't work it out.
    Why anyone would want to spend months (as some people do) at this remote place south of Broome is still a mystery to Bob and I.
    The tides are huge but, when it comes in, the beach is lined with fishermen after the thread fin salmon. We watched 39 catching nothing for an hour and figured there had to be more to life.
    We tried walking the beach and that kept us amused for a time but, weeks and months?

    Not much I can see to get excited about Red eyed plover
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    Hunter River

    by iandsmith Updated Nov 22, 2008

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    It was rough. Ploughing through the chop negotiating the world's second largest tidal currents can be bouncy and so it was. Our tender (opening pic) bore the brunt of the wash and spray could often be seen flying skywards.
    Eventually we made the more sheltered waters of Hunter River where we anchored and then got in the tender for a trip up the river that winds through the mangrove swamps. En route we landed and saw a couple of aboriginal paintings but they weren't all that good (pic 4). More eyecatching was the rock scenery (pics 2,3,5) and, in particular the mineral stained rocks.

    Wild crossing Rock formation Close up of the rocks Looking for the aboriginal paintings Natural rock mosaic
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    Last days

    by iandsmith Updated Nov 22, 2008

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    As we drifted into the last three days there still wasn't a sense of the trip coming to and end as our cruise was filled constantly with new experiences.
    The wildlife outside of the water wasn't as prolific as I'd expected and raptors predominated as shown in the opening picture.
    They were undoubtedly after exactly what I'd caught in pic 2.
    At Camp Creek (pic 3) we had our biggest drama of the cruise. About 3 hours after this pic was taken all hell broke loose. With the massive tides creating 21 k.p.h. currents, your anchor tends to get a workout. When the change came our boat naturally started to swing around. Unlucky; half way round it got stuck on a rock and wouldn't budge. That wasn't so bad but our tinnie was jammed until it actually rolled under the boat and petrol tanks and other stuff went roaring off upstream into the inky blackness.
    Our redoubtable crew launched the other boat and headed off into the night, eventually retrieving all the lost gear except for one item.
    Our next stop was Careening Bay, named by Phillip Parker King after his ship, ‘HMC Mermaid’, was careened during his first voyage of discovery in the Kimberley. It was beached and cleaned here and we had our first group picture taken in front of the massive boab tree bearing the inscription ‘HMC Mermaid – 1820’, still clearly visible almost 200 years later. (pic 4)
    On one of the points of the bay I explored a rocky outcrop and found lots of amazing rocks there, some of which you can see in pic 5.

    Sea eagle Man with fish Camp Creek near sunset That's what I call a tree! Boab Mysterious rocks of Careening Bay
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State of Western Australia Off The Beaten Path

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