Pemberton Things to Do

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    The station
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Most Recent Things to Do in Pemberton

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    The Gloucester Tree

    by keeweechic Written Jun 26, 2009
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    The Gloucester Tree is probably the most well known of the fire lookout trees in this are. This magnificent Karri tree stands at around 60 metres high. The lookout was built in 1947. This Karri is the tallest tree found in Western Australia and apparently the 3rd tallest in the world. There are entry fees.

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    • Historical Travel
    • Photography

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    Pemberton Mill

    by keeweechic Written Jun 23, 2009

    The Mill Workers hall, built in 1913, was one of Pemberton’s oldest buildings as well as one of the earliest community buildings. It became the venue for social functions such as dances, plays and concerts for the saw milling community. Weddings were also often held there. At one time the building also served as a school. The building has been restored after it had been left to deteriorate.

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    Tram Class 1

    by keeweechic Written Jun 23, 2009
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    The tram run south of Pemberton to the Warren River Bridge stopping at the Cascades. It then returns to Pemberton. Warren River is around 1 ¾ hours from Pemberton. You travel deep within the Karri forests, pas the Saw Mill and cross around 6 bridges before getting to the Warren River Bridge. It is at this point that the Lefroy Brook meets up with the Warren River.

    The tram departs twice daily at 10.45am and 2.00pm. The journey takes around 1 ¾ hours.

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    The Steam Locomotive

    by keeweechic Written Jun 23, 2009
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    This type of steam locomotive was operated by the Government of Western Australia and was one of twenty four. Built in 1955 by the British, it operated between 1955 and 1971 to transport coal and other heavy freight. The V Class 1213 loco and train is now used for transporting passengers for the Pemberton Tramways. The steam train operates from Easter weekend to November and travels to Eastbrook.

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    Pemberton Tramways

    by keeweechic Written Jun 23, 2009
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    The Pemberton Tramway operates for tourist to transport them through the wonderful Karri, Jarrah and Marri forests of this region. Diesel and steam trains are used as well as trams which go a distance of around 57kms. The company is privately operated and its staff are both voluntary and paid.

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    Pemberton Tourist Centre

    by keeweechic Written Jun 23, 2009

    The Visitors centre is right in the heart of town, down the main street. All the information you need on the area is here. They will also make any bookings for you including TransWA and accommodation. Within the centre is the Karri Forest Discovery Centre.

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  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    One Tree Bridge

    by Kathrin_E Updated May 12, 2009

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    One Tree Bridge
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    Pioneer settlers built the bridge in 1904. One single karri tree was feeld to carry the bridge across Donnelly River. It survived until 1966 when winter floods swept it away. What is left of the One Tree Bridge is now displayed on land, a new bridge has been built.
    More info and map

    Related to:
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • Architecture
    • Historical Travel

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    The Four Aces

    by Kathrin_E Updated May 12, 2009

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    The Four Aces
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    The Four Aces are four magnificent Karri trees standing in a row. My photos do not do them justice, they are far far bigger and far far more impressive than they look when reduced to a height of 500 pixels. They are 75 m high and approximately 400 years old.
    More info and a map on the web

    There is a short hiking trail into the forest that starts from the parking lot. Walk into the forest, no need to go far. Listen and feel. Listen to the sounds of the forest, the wind, rustling leaves and cracking twigs, the voices of the birds. Keep quiet and feel the atmosphere. It is magic.

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    • Hiking and Walking
    • Jungle and Rain Forest

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  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Climb Gloucester Tree, or Watch Others Climbing...

    by Kathrin_E Updated May 7, 2009

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    Climbing Gloucester Tree
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    The forests of the southwest had a network of fire lookouts on top of the hugest trees. These are not in operation any more due to better observation technologies. One of the three that can be climbed is Gloucester Tree in Glocester National Park near Pemberton. The tree is about 50 m high and the view must be amazing.

    Climbing is done at your own risk. It is free and there are no guards and no safety measures. Iron bars and thin steel ropes form a spiral ladder up the tree trunk. If you are even the slightest bit scared of heights, think twice about tackling the climb.
    For me, no way, never. People-watching from safe ground is fun, though.

    In addition to that the bush around the tree is nice for bird-watching. I got to see Western Rosellas, Ringnecks, and Common Bronzewings at close distance. Since they are often fed by visitors, the birds come close and are rather tame. Have your camera ready.
    See travelogue for bird photos!

    Related to:
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • Birdwatching
    • Mountain Climbing

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  • arianne_1504's Profile Photo

    Cascades

    by arianne_1504 Updated Dec 4, 2006

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    The Cascades are just beautiful. There's bbq facilities and a picnic area here - free entry. There's a walk trail around the area, and it's just a magic place to come, especially when the cascades are actually running.

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    Dave Evans Bicentennial Tree

    by arianne_1504 Written Dec 4, 2006

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    One of the three fire lookout trees in the area which is open to the public. The tree was pegged in 1988 as part of Australia’s Bicentenary celebrations. Like the Gloucester Tree you can climb the Bicentennial Tree and look out over Warren National Park and the surrounding farmland. There are toilet, bbq and picnic facilities at the tree.

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  • Kate-Me's Profile Photo

    Enjoy the park at the Gloucester Tree

    by Kate-Me Written Nov 11, 2005
    two of the friendly parrots
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    If you're not climbing the Gloucester tree and you like wildlife, you'll have plenty to amuse you in the park. There's picnic tables & facilities, and the birds are super friendly :-)
    2 main species of parrots (including the Australian Ringneck) and other birds like wood pigeons, most of which will eat out of your hand (careful not to overfeed)

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    • Birdwatching
    • National/State Park

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  • Kate-Me's Profile Photo

    Visit and maybe climb the Gloucester tree.....

    by Kate-Me Written Nov 11, 2005
    if you blow up the photo you might just see the cl
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    If you're not afraid of heights and it's not wet or windy, you could climb the Gloucester tree.
    My husband first did it 15 years ago, and you can still do it today.
    It's a long climb.... 61 metres tall and the climb is nearly vertical at the top (says the warning sign that tells you under what conditions not to climb)

    Related to:
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    • Eco-Tourism
    • National/State Park

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  • scrooge1947's Profile Photo

    Pemberton Tramway

    by scrooge1947 Updated Apr 13, 2003

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    all on board

    We stayed longer in town waiting for this trip which takes 1 3/4 hours and goes to Warren RIver and the Cascade falls.
    For us it was not worth waiting for and I was going to put it in Tourists Traps but some would probably really enjoy the journey., so here it is.

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  • scrooge1947's Profile Photo

    A gentle morning run.

    by scrooge1947 Written Apr 11, 2003

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    Paths from The Glocester Tree.

    I went early morning for a run to have a look at The Gloucester Tree and suroundings, strange as it may sound I take a small camera with a self timer, amazing sometimes what you find.
    This particular day I got lost so instead of a round trip. I had to find my way back the way I had come, the wife seems to notice when I have been away for several hours.

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Pemberton Things to Do

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