Fun things to do in Perth

  • Things to Do
    by littlebush
  • Things to Do
    by littlebush
  • Things to Do
    by littlebush

Most Viewed Things to Do in Perth

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    To do in the city...

    by littlebush Written Apr 19, 2013

    -Freo-great day out-cafe culture and a different vibe to perth. South beach is nice just a short walk from town. Its $4 one way and 30mins by train from perth station.
    -Rottnest-$236 if you dont get a early booking for 2 people return ferry and 2 bikes for the day ($30 each)-the bikes were crap though. Great place, lovely beaches.
    -Bell tower-$14-pretty dull but nice enough views
    -Cottesloe beach-the main beach, 20mins by train, $4 one way.
    -Galley-nice enough comtemporary art
    -Museum-very good, free-lots of stuffed animals and loads of dead insects etc. A great section on aboriginal culure including the stolen generation.
    -York-an old town 97km from perth , east over the perth hills-old in oz terms is not old in european terms so its hard to get excited but it does have some nice old buidlings. The Terrace cafe is the cheapest in town with massive burger and chcken snitzel fwith shake and cofee for $30.
    -Kings park-walk in 10min uphill from the CBD or bus 37. Grat views and great relaxation overlooking teh city and swan river.

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    Town Hall

    by leffe3 Written Sep 8, 2012

    The only convict-built Town Hall in any of the State capital cities, Perth Town Hall was opened in 1870.

    It may not feel much, but the building is actually built on the highest point of the city on the corner of Hay and Barrack Streets. It was never very practical as a Town Hall and although it took many years to move out and into more appropriate premises, changes, add-ons, appropriation for offices started almost as soon as the building was opened.

    Crowded by contemporary development, it was in 1994 that, with the demolition of a building that had crowded it on two sides, extensive damage was recognised and a major renovation, which took until 2005, was undertaken. For the first time in a century, all sides of the Town Hall were on public view.

    Today, as well as the premier venue for civic receptions, the Town Hall is now a popular venue for banquets, public forums, business meetings, functions and weddings.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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    Northbridge

    by leffe3 Updated Sep 7, 2012

    Day or night, Northbridge seems to be one of the main places to hang out.

    Main drag is James Street and William Street, full as it is with cafes, bars, clubs, restaurants, live music venues, bookshops, cinemas, gaming centres interspersed with a few shops.

    Nighttime it certainly comes alive with the junction of William and James a focal point. Just away from this, heading away from the city is a real Vietnamese area with lots of cafes, restaurants and shops heading towards Brisbane St.

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

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    Rubberneck at Perth's most expensive real estate!

    by CatherineReichardt Updated Jun 6, 2012

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    Perth's greatest asset is its stunning location on the banks of the Swan River: in my (very biased), of all Oz's state capitals, it is second only to Sydney in the beauty of its setting.

    Actually modern day Perth spans the confluence of two rivers: the Swan and the Canning, which come together in a beautiful open stretch of Melville Water close to the upmarket suburb of Applecross. Geomorphologically speaking, the Swan is actually a ria - a river valley that was 'drowned' by the increase in sea level at the end of the last ice age, resulting in a river that is much wider than you would expect for its size. The Swan, is, after all, a short river (barely 100km long) and has a catchment that doesn't receive huge amounts of rain even in the wettest winter. As a result, the Swan is brackish as far up as the Perth CBD, so it's quite common to see dolphins as far inland as Melville Water and jellyfish get washed even further upstream.

    There are many ways to explore the Swan - from hiring a bike to cycle along the network of cycle paths to strolling along the foreshore or catching the ferry between the Barrack Street jetty and South Perth. However, if you have the time, I think that the very best way to appreciate the Swan estuary is to take a boat trip from Barrack Street to Fremantle, which gives you an entirely different perspective on the city and its suburbs.

    Also, if you have a voyeuristic gene, the river cruise will allow you a unique opportunity to rubberneck at the most expensive and jawdroppingly opulent riverside real estate in Western Australia! These are home to the great, the good and the downright notorious (the now deceased reprobate Alan Bond being an excellent case in point) and the commentary on these trips is scurrilous and highly amusing in a typically Aussie 'tongue in cheek' manner.

    If you're planning to visit Rottnest Island as well, then why not consider catching the ferry from the Barrack Street jetty, which then travels down the Swan to Fremantle? Although this is a longer and more expensive trip than the more usual option of catching the ferry from Freo, it is still considerably cheaper than doing the river cruise and the ferry as separate trips, and also saves you time if you're on a tight time schedule. Another advantage is that if you catch a late afternoon ferry back from Rotto (which you'll want to do to maximise your time there), then chances are that you'll arrive back in Perth about dusk, which will allow you the opportunity to appreciate the stunning vista of the illuminated CBD skyline as you approach Barrack Street.

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    Bibbulman Track: volunteering in the bush

    by CatherineReichardt Updated Jun 6, 2012

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    We often get forum queries from people looking to volunteer in Australia - often young people on a 'gap' year - and so here's an idea that might be woth considering.

    The Bibbulmun Track is a 964 kilometre premier walking track from Perth to a small city of Albany on the south coast of Western Australia. En route it passes through astonishingly beautiful bush and is a wonderful experience, even if you only get to hike a certain section.

    Maintaining and upgrading the track is a labour of love, and is undertaken by a 3,500 strong band of volunteers, assisted by (to quote the website), "prison gangs of trustee prisoners for some of the heavier work" (!).

    The Bibbulman Track Foundation is always looking for willing volunteers to assist them in this work - the company I used to work for in Perth used to do this as a corporate social responsibility exercise.

    Even if you don't have the time and energy to help out in person, other opportunities to help include making a donation to their sponsorship drive for eco-friendly 'dunnies' (toilets) along the route. This provides you with a unique stab at immortality, as for a fee you can have a family or individual plaque set on the dunny door on any of the forty-eight shelters which house dry bush drop toilets! (See the website for details on how to avail yourself of this appealing opportunity).

    An opportunity to spend time in the bush, have a toilet named in your honour and maybe even rub shoulders with dinky di crims ... sounds like the quintessential Aussie experience to me! :)

    Maintenance volunteers on the Bibbulman Track

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    Conquer the highest peak in Perth!

    by CatherineReichardt Updated Jun 6, 2012

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    Much is justifiably written on the charms of Perth's Kings Park, but there are other parks in the city that are also worth making the time and effort to visit.

    A case in point is Bold Park, which is located on the seaward side of the CBD next to Oceanic Drive, sandwiched between the suburbs of City Beach and Floreat Park.

    It contains Reabold Hill, which was known by early settlers as One Tree Hill. This is the highest 'peak' in the Perth inner metropolitan area, rising a mighty 93m above sea level - which probably doesn't sound like much, but that's pretty lofty by Perth's pancake flat standards, and it's still a stiff hike on a hot day! Once at the top of the hill, your effort will be rewarded with views out over the Indian Ocean to the west, and to the CBD to the east. My top tip? Visit on your way to the beach so that you can reward yourself with a refreshing dip after your exertions!

    The area was originally quarried for limestone, and there are still remains of the former lime kilns hidden in the bush. The former quarry has been imaginatively repurposed into an amphitheatre, which hosts theatrical and musical performances in the summer months - a wonderful place to bring a picnic on a hot summer night - I will write a separate tip on this once I can find a decent photo! Click on this link for information on forthcoming performances.

    The Bold Park Reserve covers 437 hectares of native bushland, which abuts the Perry Lakes - see the website below for some excellent suggestions on hiking trails. Bold Park itself is a large park with lots of open areas and shady trees that make it an ideal place for families to have a barbie and let off steam.

    Reabold Hill with the Perth CBD in the background

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    Chamber of Commerce Freemantle

    by cjg1 Updated May 3, 2012

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    The building that houses the Fremantle of Commerce is an old building from the Boom time in Western Australia. I'm glad to see that old building here are maintained and keep alive; not demolished and left to rot as they sometimes are back at home.

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    The Cloisters: Bishop Mathew Hale

    by cjg1 Updated Apr 24, 2012

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    While walking from our hotel to the train station we came upon the Bishop Hale statue. Bishop Hale was first Bishop of Perth and then went on to be the Bishop of Brisbane. When he was Bishop of Perth he opened the firts college for boys(now called Hale School) which is the oldest boys school in Western Australia. In 2008 a statue of the Bishop was errected by the Cloisters.

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    Sidewalk Art

    by cjg1 Updated Apr 24, 2012

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    I do enkoy exploring a city on foot; there is so much to discover. During our walks around Perth we discovered many public art installations along the way. My favorite was a lifelike sculpture of a dog. As we approached I almost throught it was a rela dog on the street waiting for its owner.

    Hey there Fido

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    Vasco da Gama Monument

    by cjg1 Updated Apr 23, 2012

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    While strolling through the Esplanade Park we found a strange fin like sculpture. Upon further inspection the sculpture reads "Vasco de Gama". The sculpture commemorates the explorations of Vasco de Gama especially the voyages that linked Europe with the Indian Ocean.

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    Western Australian Visitors Centre

    by cjg1 Updated Apr 13, 2012

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    The Western Australia Visitor's Center is a great place to stop in when first arriving in the city. The center has plenty of books, brochures and maps to help navigate the city and the surrounding area. Helpful staff can arrange tours and accomodations if you are in need of assistance.

    My wife and I stopped here for a few brochures before catching a train to Fremantle.

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    Situate Sculpture (aka The Cactus)

    by cjg1 Written Apr 10, 2012

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    Walking from the train station we came across these big green Cactus sculptures. Apparently these sculptures by James Angus meant to look like cactuses.... it is just confusing and looks out of place in the middle of the city.

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    Talbot Hobbs Memorial

    by cjg1 Updated Apr 9, 2012

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    As we were walking Riverside Drive we came acoss this Memorial which is mostly hidden by the leaves of a tree. Upon inspection we found it to be a memorial to a WWI soldier. When we returned to the states my wife did a litle more inquiring and found that Lieutenant General Sir JJ Talbot Hobbs was Australia's most distinguished WWI soldiers an a prominent architect to boot.

    This statue plays a significant role in the Perth Anzac Parade every year.

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    State Images Mosaics

    by cjg1 Updated Apr 9, 2012

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    In Barrack Square past the Swan Bells we stumbled across the State Images Mosaics. Ten sepearte areas of Western Australia won a competition in 200 to have their Mosaic installed in the square. Each mosaic represents the culture and lifestyle of that particular region.

    The Mosaics surround a large pool of water complete with a fountain in the ceneter. My wife and I spent some time admiring the mosaics which were very colorful.

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    The Swan Bells

    by cjg1 Updated Mar 30, 2012

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    The Swan Bells are a set of 18 bells hanging in The Swan Bell Tower. The Bell Tower overlooks the Swan River and is a large copper and glass structure and are one of the largest sets of change ringing bells in the world.

    Twelve of the Swan Bells are historic and hail from St Martin-in-the-Fields church in Trafalgar Square in London. The St Martin-in-the-Fields bells were donated to the State of Western Australia as part of the 1988 Australian bicentenary celebrations.

    The Bell Tower is a popular attraction in Perth for the bells themselves and the beautiful views from the Tower. Of course this all comes with an admission fee of $14 for adults and $9 for children.

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