The Perth Mint, Perth

4 out of 5 stars 15 Reviews

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  • Perth Mint
    Perth Mint
    by balhannah
  • The Strike
    The Strike
    by balhannah
  • Statue at the Perth Mint.
    Statue at the Perth Mint.
    by IreneMcKay
  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    THE STRIKE SCULPTURE

    by balhannah Written Mar 27, 2015

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Located outside the entrance of the Perth Mint, is a very real looking bronze sculpture known as "The Strike."

    This sculpture is about the two men - William Ford and Arthur Bayley who are credited with finding the first major gold find in Western Australia. This happened back in 1892, near the town of Coolgardie where I had previously been.

    Take a look at their faces as they eagerly examine their find! These full sized statues were sculpted by Greg James, who is famous for many sculptures found in Perth.
    They certainly are realistic!

    The plaque reads
    "This sculpture depicts the gold strike near Coolgardie by
    prospectors William Ford and Arthur Bayley in 1892 which
    unleashed the gold rushes that secured the future of the
    struggling colony of Western Australia. Established one of the
    State's most successful and enduring industries and led to the
    foundation of the Perth Mint in 1899."

    You can visit this sculpture and the garden for free.

    The Strike
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    THE PERTH MINT

    by balhannah Updated Mar 25, 2015

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    The Perth Mint is a leading tourist attraction in Perth. We decided to come here and take a tour, as this Mint is where the nation's official bullion and commemorative coins are made, also bars of gold for investors and other precious metal products. We had been to the Mint in Canberra, which mints Australia's currency, this was very interesting. We were keen to see what this Mint was like!

    We booked our tour when we arrived, then had a look in the shop as we had 15minutes to wait for our tour to begin. Our guide was one of the workers. who was a knowledgable, pleasant and humorous young man.

    We learnt how gold was first found as we stood in the garden beside a replica of the Golden Eagle nugget, wow! it was huge! Next we were taken inside the building where our guide began taking us on an interesting journey through time, from the early gold rush days when heaps of prospectors spent years working in backbreaking conditions in outback Australia in search of gold nuggets.

    We were taken inside and saw the real thing, many natural gold nuggets including Newmont's Normandy Nugget, the second largest gold nugget in existence. Weight - 25.5 kilograms

    What was amazing, was seeing the largest gold coin ever made. There it was before our very eyes, the Australian Kangaroo One tonne Gold Coin, the largest and most valuable coin in the world. The coin is 99.99% pure gold, it measures nearly 80cm wide and is more than 12cm deep. The value of this coin - More than $50 million! Now that was impressive and well worth seeing!

    Our guide let us view the end section of the tour by ourselves, but was on hand to answer any questions we had. We looked through glass windows to watch the workers making coins, unfortunately there was only one person working.

    When we all had finished looking here, we were taken into the Gold Pour room. This is Perth Mint's original melting house, which is embedded with gold dust accumulated over many years of refining. A small stand is where we sat, and then a new guide took over the gold story. He showed us the pure gold being heated to molten temperatures, then quickly he took the liquid gold and poured into an empty mould. Hey, presto, we had just seen a gold bar be made!

    This was the last stop of the tour. We could go back and have another look, which we did, and we weighed ourselves on the scales. The scales spit out a print out of how much your worth in gold at the price it was that day! Quite interesting, and for once, any larger sized person was worth the most money!

    For a souvenir, you can put a message on an aluminium bronze, gold plated, 99.9% pure silver or 99.99% pure gold medallion. From $17, these medallions are ready to take away with you by the time you have finished the tour.

    NO PHOTO'S ALLOWED INSIDE, ONLY IN THE GARDEN

    OPENING HOURS
    Open 7 Days: 9am - 5pm
    Public Holidays: 9am - 5pm
    Closed: Christmas Day, Boxing Day, New Year's Day, Good Friday and Anzac Day.

    TOURS

    A tour consists of a Guided Talk, entrance in to The Perth Mint Gold Exhibition and Gold Pouring demonstration
    Weekdays 9.30am, 10.30am, 11.30am,12.30pm,1.30pm, 2.30pm and 3.30pm
    Weekends & Public Holidays 9.30am, 10.30am, 11.30am,12.30pm,1.30pm, 2.30pm and 3.30pm

    ADMISSION IN 2015

    Adult $19.00
    Concession Card Holder $17.00
    Children (4 to 15 years) $8.00
    Children (0-3 years) no charge
    Family Pass (two adults/two children) $45.00

    Perth Mint
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    The Perth Mint

    by Drever Written Apr 8, 2014

    Fortune smiled on Western Australia at the end of the 19th century. On 17th September 1892, Arthur Bayley discovered gold at Coolgardie, 560 kilometres east of Perth, and rode into Southern Cross with 540 ounces in his saddlebags.

    Change occurred at breathtaking speed. Towns thrived and faded at prospectors discovered new goldfields which and in turn they left for richer pickings elsewhere. Regular coaches appeared for carrying mail, passengers and gold. Commerce flourished, railways arrived, telegraph lines extended and the authorities built a new harbour for the many ships arriving. The newly rich indulged in riotous spending. They made fortunes and often as quickly lost it. Perth Mint tells the stories of dreams shattered and dreams fulfilled.

    A Hugh Corbet praised the old prospectors with these words:

    ‘What a wonderful man he was! Assailed by thirst, hunger,
    weariness. He never admitted defeat. Something of a
    hermit, he shunned his fellow men – something of an
    ascetic, he despised the shelter of towns- something of a
    mystic he walks beneath a rainbow nobody else could
    see, secure in the faith that he would presently find the
    crock of gold.’

    In the arid conditions water was at a premium. More and larger condensers arrived to extract freshwater from salt, with more and more trees felled for fuel. A revolutionary water pipeline received the go-ahead.

    The scarcity of water meant that prospectors could not use panning to separate gold panning from the dirt. Instead they used a dryblower, a machine that relied on motion and wind to isolate the gold. The clouds of dust created contributed to the respiratory disease from which many people died.

    In the 1930s because of the world depression gold value soared and the gold mining industry, which had been stagnating, boomed again. The Australian government to help the unemployed offered them transport to the goldfields as well as food and prospecting equipment.

    Many of the miners had experienced gold rushes many times before. Round a campfire one heard tales of Africa, New Guinea, New Zealand, Australia, America and other strange countries that would be a mine of information to a writer of books of adventure tales. Told in the quiet unostentatious manner of the habitual digger to whom poverty, riches and hardships, harsh conditions endured by prospectors seeking their fortunes comes in turn.

    If you wish to rediscover the excitement of these earlier times the Mint is the place to visit. It is a lovely historic building built in the 1890s. The Mint, a branch of London’s Royal Mint, refined gold from Western Australia’s goldfields and struck gold sovereign coins for the British Empire.

    Behind the majestic wrought iron gates locked to the public for more than 90 years, The Perth Mint now unveils a wealth of treasures. It is one of the world's oldest mints still working from its original building. Now it still produces legal tender precious metal coins and commemorative medallions for investors and collectors around the world, and trades in bullion.

    The "Gold Exhibition" displays Australia's biggest collection of nuggets. You can watch the minting of gold coins, handle a 400-ounce gold bar, and engrave your own medallion. Tours start with a guided heritage walk on the half-hour, and lead on to a traditional gold pouring demonstration in the original Melt House– the highlight of the Gold Exhibition. The shop sells gold coins and nugget jewellery, and the Tea Garden provides a quiet spot to relax.

    The Mint Accommodation on the goldfields Tools of the trade Little miner strikes it rich
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  • IreneMcKay's Profile Photo

    The Perth Mint

    by IreneMcKay Written Jul 15, 2013

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    This looked good, but we did not have time to visit. We just photoed the statue outside.

    Activities listed for inside include: watching a gold pour during which pure gold is heated to molten temperatures and transformed into a solid gold bar; viewing a record breaking coin
    which weighs a massive one tonne of 99.99% pure gold. This coin measures 80cms wide and is more than 12cms deep. It is valued at more than $50 million.

    Next time.

    Statue at the Perth Mint.
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  • stevemt's Profile Photo

    Perth Mint

    by stevemt Updated Mar 7, 2011

    A very interesting place to visit and tour.
    Jewellery and gold products are on sale, and there is a tour which is great that goes every hour. Cost is A$15 (if you have the perth trab brochure, there is a 10% discount.)

    Tour includes the history, seeing the gold ingot collection and some nuggets and gold pouring.

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  • Kathrin_E's Profile Photo

    Perth Mint: "Perth's most valuable attraction"

    by Kathrin_E Written May 6, 2008

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    ... or so they claim in their advertising.

    Ever wanted to see gold, gold, gold? The treasure chambers of the Mint present nuggets, gold bars, coins and everything glittering. Sorry, strictly no photos allowed inside.

    Gold pouring is shown every hour, quite nice to see, especially because the guy who's doing it is making a funny show of it. - To be honest, I have to admit that the founding of church bells from tons of bronze (which I've been able to watch recently) is a little more impressive...

    Step on the scales to get to know the value of your weight in gold. No worries, the thing doesn't betray the number of kgs, all it showns is $$$.

    The shop is worth seeing even if you don't have a couple of hundreds of dollars to spend: jewellery, nuggets, coins, precious stones and pearls. All these precious souvenirs are certified and thus trustworthy.

    Opening hours: Mon-Fri 9 a.m. - 4 p.m., Sat-Sun 9 a.m. - 1 p.m.
    Entrance fee: adults $ 15

    The Perth Mint The Successful Gold Diggers
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  • bijo69's Profile Photo

    The Perth Mint

    by bijo69 Written Apr 13, 2008

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    The Perth Mint was founded in 1899 after the discovery of gold in WA and is still is use today.
    You can join a tour (highly recommended) which takes you through the history of the mint and ends with a gold pouring demonstration. Afterwards you can wander around and admire the various coins and bars which are on display or you can have your own coin minted.

    The Mint is open weekdays from 9am to 5pm and weekends from 9am to 1pm. Admission is 15 AUD for adults.

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    Perth Mint: Get your hands on some gold

    by UKDaisy Written Apr 13, 2006

    Wanna get your hands on some gold worth $200,000? Then come here and see for yourself how big a block of gold worth that amount looks and weighs. There are also live demonstrations of how molten gold is turned into gold bars.

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    Mint for you?

    by bitbit Written Oct 24, 2005

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    This is a 'must-see' - it being a multiple tourism award winner. The museum contains a variety of historical displays , you can take a heritage walk, view gold pouring demonstration (held hourly at the melt house), try to lift a $200,000 gold bar, view a wide collection of gold nuggets, coins etc. Opens daily (9am-4pm weekdays and 9am-1pm weekends and PH).

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    Looking for GOLD???

    by Tripack Updated Jun 19, 2005

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    As said Jean Racine: "Point d’argent, point de Suisse" (= No money, no Swiss).

    How could I resist to visit this place, may be I could discover the Philosopher's stone which allows the transmutation of lead into gold...

    What an experience I've learnt that The Perth Mint is a world leader in the manufacture of precious metal coins, medallions and collectables. I saw molten gold being poured to make a 200oz bar in live... and even try to lift a real gold bar weighing 400oz. Admire a 369ounce 'Golden Beauty', one of the largest nuggets in the world.

    At the end my gold thirsty was greater, I just ran to the next pub to order a XXXX Gold. The barmaid told me: Sorry mate, no Gold for the brave, we are in WA! (excuse me just a reminiscence from my Queensland stay ;-)

    Opening Hours: Weekdays 9am - 4pm
    Weekends & Public Holidays 9am - 1pm

    GOLD!!!
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  • Perth Mint

    by gerberra Written Mar 14, 2005

    A fun tour about making gold! and you get to see all the gold stuff...The Perth Mint began operating in 1899 and ceased ops in 1990.

    The highlight is a gold pour demonstration at the Melting House. The friendly tour guides bring you around the place and explain about the discovery of coin in WA back in 1890s. In fact, we had the honour of having 17-year old Colin as thr tour guide on his "virgin tour".

    Try your strength by lifting a 400 ounce gold bar worth over $200,000. I couldn't lift it up at all! only managed to shift its position. Was really heavy.

    There are many coin displays throughout the whole place. You can get your loved ones a special sovenir, by minting a personalised medallion. There are a few designs to choose from (diff prices) and can engrave the medallion with a personal message. It was fun to watch the computer engrave the message on the coin too.

    There's this other machine whereby if you put a AUD2 into it, it moves and emboss a Perth Mint design on a bronze coin and i get to keep that. It was pretty fun too.

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  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    The Perth Mint

    by keeweechic Updated Jan 10, 2005

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    The Perth Mint is housed in 19th century heritage buildings and it is the nations oldest operating mint as well as being one of the oldest mints in the world which still produces coins from the original premises. They have the largest collection of natural gold nuggets in Australia’s. You can watch molten gold being poured in to make 200oz bars. There is also a good gift shop with all kinds of things imaginable made out of gold and coins.

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    The Perth Mint

    by aramat Written Aug 26, 2004

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    The Perth Mint was established in 1899 as a branch of the British Royal Mint to refine gold from Western Australia's goldfields and to strike gold sovereign coins. Today it is one of WA's most historic buildings, and one of the world's oldest mints still operating from its original premises.

    There are lots of things to do in the Mint: watch a gold pour, measure your weight and see its worth in gold, try to pick up a 400 oz real gold bar (it's very heavy!), mint your own medallion with a personalised message or shop for souvenirs. There is also a cool exhibition with a reconstructed 19th century prospectors' camp, and gold nuggets, bars and jewellery from all around the world.

    The Perth Mint
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    Golddiggers Unite. Liquid Gold is here.

    by ChadSteve1975 Written Mar 28, 2004

    If you've ever wondered about the prescious metal, wanted to see it melted and pured into the Gold Bars we'd all love to own, than this is the place for you.

    The Perth Mint is where collectable Gold Coins are minted.

    Built in the 1800s the mint used to house 15 furnances. Now its home to just one. And a single gold bar which is melted and cooled twice a day. The same bar has been used for 20 year.

    The real Mintees
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    Perth mint

    by SanderH Written Oct 9, 2002

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    There is a demonstration gold pouring every hour. Very impressive to see how they handle the gold.
    You can also try to pick up a real gold bar just to see how heavy gold is. Most women and children are not able to lift the bar with just one hand.

    You can easely combine this with other activities in Perth center. Just take a free CAT.

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