Toodyay Things to Do

  • Toodyay Vintage cars by aussirose
    Toodyay Vintage cars by aussirose
    by aussirose
  • Toodyay Vintage cars by aussirose
    Toodyay Vintage cars by aussirose
    by aussirose
  • Toodyay Vintage cars by aussirose
    Toodyay Vintage cars by aussirose
    by aussirose

Best Rated Things to Do in Toodyay

  • aussirose's Profile Photo

    Toodyay - Home of Vintage cars

    by aussirose Written Dec 21, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Toodyay Vintage cars by aussirose
    3 more images

    There is not alot to do at Toodyay itself well except for having deavonshire tea in the cafe or a drink or two in the old heritage pub and a few games of pool with the locals.

    However on the weekend Toodyay comes alive with old Vintage cars. It seems that all the locals and those that know about this unusual custom visit Toodyay on the weekend.

    So if you are into Vintage cars then Toodyay is the place to be on the weekend.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip
    • Photography

    Was this review helpful?

  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    Connors Mill

    by keeweechic Written Feb 15, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    3 more images

    Connors Mill is probably the focal point of Toodyay. The mill was built in 1870 by a local builder to grind the locally grown wheat. This was the third one to be built in the Toodyay district and was built for Dan Connor who had his house and store next to the site. The Mill is now known as the Moondyne Gallery and is a fine example of a working flour mill. The original 19th century machine is still there being driven by a 27 tonne tonne steam engine. You will see and read all about the operation of the mill and even life on the 3rd floor in the living quarters. It is apparently the only flour mill in Australia to have twins born on the top floor.

    The Mill is open from 9am - 5pm daily. Tickets can be bought at the visitor centre.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    The Accommodation

    by keeweechic Written Feb 15, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    Above the mill was the Connor accommodation. In those times it was common for people to live close to or even within their place of work. In late 1925 the mill engineer set up home in the mill with his young wife and twins.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    Hot and Noisy

    by keeweechic Updated Feb 15, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    Life above a mill was certainly noisy with the continuous hum of machines and smell of engine fumes. The only plus side would have been the warmth from the big steam engines during the winter months but I can only imagine the stifling heat during the summer. It seems that on really hot days, his wife would drape a bed sheet over the kitchen table and trickle water over it to create a large 'Coolgardie Safe'. Then she would put the little ones there to keep cool.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    The Seperator

    by keeweechic Written Feb 15, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Local farmers would deliver their wheat to Connor's Mill. It was then hoisted up to the top floor and fed by the miller into the seed cleaner. There were four cleaning stages the separator went through: removing chaff etc by passing through an air blower, removing leaves, sticks and straw through the large grid screen. The grid selected the wheat grain from the chaff as well as the Lupins and other large foreign seeds. The final grid removed the smaller impurities. This was referred to as the 'sand tray'

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    The Dresser

    by keeweechic Written Feb 15, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The big sieve or Centrifugal Dresser was used to mill the product by agitating it along a silk screen. The flour then falls to the 'worm' conveyor where it is taken to the bagging machine. Flat cups at t on the left side of the dresser carries out the remnant crushed wheat which is the pollard and the bran. This was sold back to farmers for feed for chickens and pigs. The bran is now used in a variety of breakfast cereals.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    The Brush Machine

    by keeweechic Written Feb 15, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Mill Display

    The Brush Machine was a stage in the cleaning of the wheat. The 'Smut Dust' is as fine as flour and had to be removed before milling because it could not be separated from the flour once the milling had begun.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    The Pickling machine

    by keeweechic Updated Feb 22, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Pickling machine cleaned the wheat of the 'trash' or impurities. Wheat was fed in at the top, the handled was rotated and an internal fan operated by the farmer blew away the lighter rubbish. Graduated grit trays were shaken which then separated large objects on the top tray which allowed the smaller objects to pass through to the 'sand tray'. The cleaned wheat was then separated out and removed to the conveyor which held cups which were attached to a chain or belt. It was then carried to be treated or 'pickled'. The term pickling came from the use of copper sulphate solution which was used to protect the grain against fungal disease and insects.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    The Scourer

    by keeweechic Written Feb 15, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    The wheat was thrown into the Scourer against the rough cast concrete liner which was impregnated with emery. The wheat is then stripped of its husks. The 'Smut Dust' which is the waste product, is very explosive in the atmosphere and because of this process, many flour mills caught fire.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    The Roller

    by keeweechic Written Feb 15, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This machine was used for manufacturing sheets for beehives. The sheets are made of was and shaped into a honeycomb texture effect. They are put into the hive to encourage the bees to fill them with honey. This roller was used to make blank wax sheets for the roller.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    Melting Wax

    by keeweechic Written Feb 15, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    These two galvanised metal containers were used for melting wax.

    Bee keepers were known to move around the countryside to make full use of the seasonabl flowering and pollen. A horse drawn spring car was used as transport. While out in the countryside, a camp bed was made up of two poles cut from the bush. Empty chaff bags were slipped over the poles and all was supported on two empty supers (parts of a hive).

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Historical Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    The Tourist Centre

    by keeweechic Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The Tourist Centre is behind Connors Mill. You can buy your tickets to the Mill here or to the Old Gaol. They have the usual information on local and more broader areas as well as local products and crafts for sale. Within the centre is also Ye Olde Lolly Shoppe.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    The Old Newcastle Gaol

    by keeweechic Written Feb 15, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    1 more image

    The old Newcastle Gaol was built in 1862 and is now a museum. Later the building became a hiring depot for convicts and eventually it was used as the local police station before being rented out as a private residence.

    Opening times: Weekdays 10am to 3pm, weekends 10am - 4pm Small admission.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    An Historical Museum

    by keeweechic Written Feb 15, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    From 1940 the condition of the building deteriorated and in 1962 the Toodyay Shire Council took over and restored the old Gaol. Today the Gaol is a historical museum which gives an insight into Toodyay's early settlers and their lifestyle. This old stone and shingled roof building replaced the original brick prison depot which was in Fiennes Street.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

  • keeweechic's Profile Photo

    crEarly Aboriginal Inmates

    by keeweechic Written Feb 15, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Convicts in the early days were brought in to supply labour and during the period from 1850 to 1868 they were used primarily on the construction of public buildings, roads and bridges. Their arrival here then brought the need to be able to lock them up at the end of the day and so the gaol was built. Many of the original convicts were Aboriginals. The white walled cells all open out into the exercise yard and have only a small hole for ventilation. You will be able to see these plus a kitchen, constable's quarters, storeroom and exercise yard. Close to the Old Gaol are the Police Stables. These were built around 1890 to house the horses which were used by the towns mounted police.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Road Trip

    Was this review helpful?

Instant Answers: Toodyay

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

71 travelers online now

Comments

Toodyay Things to Do

Reviews and photos of Toodyay things to do posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Toodyay sightseeing.

View all Toodyay hotels