Safety Tips in Australia

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    Bluebottle stinger
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Most Viewed Warnings and Dangers in Australia

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    IN THE NORTH IN SUMMER BEWARE OF "STINGERS"

    by DennyP Updated Feb 28, 2012

    NORTHERN AUSTRALIA
    The summer months in Australia is the time to enjoy the many marvellous beaches.. As there are so many wonderful beaches to choose from and in some locations really exotic..Like the Whitsundays ,and the Barrier Reef there are lovely beaches all around its ten thousand mile coastline..BUT they are not without their dangers.
    The" box jelly fish" is one of the most dangerous things in the northern waters..These Jelly Fish have tentacles many meters long and to come in contact with any of the tentacles they say is the most excrutiating pain on the planet..Help must be found immediately as a "sting" can lead to rapid heart deterioration..sometimes in minutes...Most northern beaches in Queensland Northern Territory and Western Australia have bottles of vinegar located by places on the beach..This is a temporary antidote for the stings..As most beaches have life guards seek help from them as they will have most things on hand to help you...They will know exactly what to do..Most beaches are netted to stop swimmers coming in contact with these dreadful things..
    Swim where the beaches are netted.and always take notice of the safety signs.
    ALWAYS look for where the bottles are located..as this can be a real time saver..READ what they say to do in an emergency ...Better before than after..
    Always read the safety information signs on the beach.
    Dont swim at night..
    Dont swim when intoxicated.
    DON'T SWIM ALONE

    Related to:
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    • Beaches
    • Diving and Snorkeling

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    NEVER BE WITHOUT DRINKING WATER

    by DennyP Updated Jan 22, 2012

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    One of the most important things to carry with you ,if notTHE MOST thing to have with you when travelling is sufficient fresh drinking water..Especially if you are out of the cities and in the "out back" this is imperritive as the temperatures can be extremly high upwardly of 40 degrees C and dehydration happens quickly.I ALWAYS carry with me in my car at least 20 litres of water for safety reasons..as most times water is NOT available. In drought conditions when Austarlia is really suffering from lack of any rainfall a lot of "outback" garages will not give you water for your car usually because the water is so scarce. Remember take care when driving in Australia as the conditions out of the cities are vastly different to what most visitors are used to.
    TRUE STORY
    I have experienced the dangers of this happening first hand ..when we were travelling in North Western Victoria.The day was extremely hot around 42 Degrees +C. when we came a cross a young woman and her baby who were dehydrating from lack of water and were both in a dangerous situation. Her car had broken down on a back road (she was taking a short cut) She hadn't told anyone which way she was travelling. (bad mistake).She was travelling alone in an extremely isolated place(bad mistake) She wasn't carrying any water (really bad mistake) and really...to do this with a three month old infant was really stupid.The car had overheated due to the extreme heat and she had no water!!!
    I stopped only by chance as I saw her car parked well off the road under a large gum tree and that her hood was up on the car but we couldnt see anybody!!! and upon investigation found the two on the back seat of the car in a very dehydrated and worried state. When I approached her car to see if all was Ok I came across the very young mother breast feeding her distressed infant.I called out to my wife to assist with the mother who was crying and in a really distressed state .I had a big " cooler "in the car and we gave her cold wet towels for her and the baby., water to drink , also water to carry with her.She was noticeably really agitated and I know that she was so happy that we had come along as she admitted that she was becoming really concerned for her and especially her babys safety.
    I then filled her overheated radiator with water and started the engine.so she could finish her journey..Made sure that she was OK to carry on and advised her to travel to the closest place (a Hotel that was about a mile away) ..gave her directions to where she could rest and contact her Husband..which she did..REALLY this could have had a completely different outcome for her and her infant.
    You know this was a culmination of events that could have been disasterous for both .
    She didn't expect the day to be so hot and have such extreme temperatures.
    She didn't check her car's radiator for water!! or engine before setting out.
    She didn't tell anyone whichway that she would be travelling!!
    She took a short cut through an isolated route well from the major highway.
    She took this isolated route while travelling with a very young infant on her own.
    She wasn't carrying any spare water!!

    I always carry at least 20-30 litres of water when outback..I also learned a big lesson this day as well to see how easy it is to find yourself in so much trouble.Dehydration occurs quickly when the temperatures are extreme and moreso when you are distressed..

    Related to:
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    • Road Trip
    • Photography

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    TAKE CARE AROUND WILDLIFE ..IN THE WILD!!

    by DennyP Updated Jan 22, 2012

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    WILDLIFE
    One of the main things on most travellers lists to do while visiting Australia is to be around , touch, handle, photograph the amazing wildlife, Kangaroos, Koala Bears, Wallabies, Wombats, Emus,Dingos, Cassowaries, Crocodiles . Being a real animal lover this is such a great thing to do. Unfortuneatly this really can only be done in wildlife Sanctuaries , Zoos , and Wildlife Parks with relative safety. The thing being they might look "cuddly" but these animals when mating or around that time become very aggressive and are dangerous. sometimes just naturally dangerous.Just recently in these last few days a family while camping , the young daughter was attacked by a "rogue" Kangaroo that was in a mob close by their camp..The father immediately attacked the Kangaroo with a stick saving his daughter from a really bad situation. I had to give a dingo a "smack" along with his mates for trying to take my shoes etc while camping at Ulru..just be careful. I made the big mistake of not sleeping with a" big stick". These animals are very inquisitive also can be very aggressive.

    They are called wildlife because thats what they are " wild life.".so when you are in the wild or the isolated "outback" ...take extreme care when coming across or coming in contact with the local wildlife..animals.. I am always extremely careful of Kangaroos, Emus, Dingos, Cassowaries, and Crocodiles .Never trust them and give them plenty of room.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Jungle and Rain Forest
    • Road Trip

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    Snakes

    by iandsmith Updated Dec 23, 2011

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    Actually this might only be an excuse to use one of my favourite shots again!
    Snakes - yes, Australia has them. Looking for the world's most poisonous? Forget your fer de lance, chuck your cobra, run past your rattler - the top ten in the world are right here! The good news is your chances of seeing them are miniscule, let alone getting bitten by one. Just as I say that I read that nearly 3,000 people are bitten each year and over 400 are given antivenom. If you do get bitten, keep a pressure bandage on the wound and movement to a minimum till you get help. The really bad ones have two fangs. Not that you'll want to be that close to check them mind, but I thought it may be interesting. The semi-poisonous have four (such as the common red-bellied black) and the pythons? Well, you'll be more worried about their body than their teeth as they kill by squeezing you.
    If you do go bush and actually fluke a sighting, then the black and the diamond python are the two you will most likely encounter. Unless you actually stand on a black he will be getting out of your way.
    The ones you really should fear are the brown. They can get aggressive (I've seen one aggressive and it's not reassuring), but, in over 50 years I've still only seen about 10 in the wild, even though they're often nearby.
    There's a saying that everywhere in Australia you're within 100 metres of a snake except in the big cities.
    Some other nasties are the taipan, mulga and deaf adder (often mis-named death adder). The latter got its name because it was believed it caused deafness in its victims.
    One key thing to remember is - stay still. They react to movement. If you're calm they'll ignore you. Except for an angry brown where you might want to offer a hat or a bag as an alternative bite but, like I say, your chances are less than one in a a hundred thousand.
    Stay lucky!
    I've since included a copperhead that I came across at Narawntapu in Tasmania, had a good time watching him have lunch. He is one of many that have very deadly venom, but, fortunateily, they have a poor delivery system.

    Related to:
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    • Desert
    • National/State Park

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    BEWARE OF ROADTRAINS WHEN DRIVING "OUTBACK"

    by DennyP Written Dec 12, 2011

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    Because of their size encountering roadtrains is usually only likely in outback highways. ALWAYS be aware of these monsters when driving..Firstly give them lots of room. They can usually throw up a lot of stones and rocks from the roadsides and can cause windscreen breakages. This is usually caused by the last trailer in the train that tends to "snake " behind the rest. Due to their size they take a longer time to pass (overtake) You must always have a long clear vision before attempting to pass one of these bohemoths..They talk of 18 wheelers the size of the normal semi trailer , These roadtrains can be pulling five or six trailers and have more that seventy wheels . I found these roadtrains on the narrow roads of Northern Queensland when encountered would take up most of the road and was wise to avoid them and get right off the road. In The Northern Territory and Western Australia I saw many on the highways with little problem.These are really long and travel fast when driving "outback"
    Please be aware of them.

    Related to:
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    • Camping

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    TRAVEL WITH ADEQUATE TRAVEL INSURANCE

    by DennyP Updated Dec 11, 2011

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    When travelling in Australia the same rules apply when travelling anywhere regarding travel Insurance. Make sure that before setting out that you take out travel Insurance with a reliable travel insurance agent in you own country. So many travellers overlook taking out Travel Insurance and consequently can find themselves in financial trouble. An accident can happen anywhere and at any time
    Australia has a wonderful medical system and the hospitals are modern and have dedicated medical staff. but, like ALL hospitals medical attention for accidents and hospital stays or other medical incidents is extremely expensive. Travelling in "outback" Australia can find the traveller a long way from civilisation and consequently a costly trip to reach a hospital. The only way in some instances to reach a hospital is with the "Flying Doctor." This is an amazing dedicated "Australian"organisation of medical staff and pilots (mostly voluntarily) with many air ambulance planes on stand by in many locations ready to service outlying areas of the country that are really isolated.
    I never travel without adequate Travel Insurance and I always include repatriation in the contract just in case of a major emergency.

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    DONT UNDERESTIMATE THE STRONG SUNSHINE

    by DennyP Written Nov 30, 2011

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    Australia is known as a country with long hot summers and very hot days. The fact is Australia also has the highest rates of different skin cancers in the world. The hole in the Ozone does not help either.
    PLEASE DO NOT OVER EXPOSE YOURSELF TO THE SUN
    We Aussies love our wonderful beaches and are famous for our sporting prowess but we pay the price in the sun. When out and about ALWAYS wear a strong sunscreen and if you are having a great day at the beach in just your "cossies" (swimming costumes.) Slap on the sunscreen especially everytime AFTER coming out of the water. Be especially careful of children exposed to the sun even on an overcast day..Remember you can't wear too much sunscreen!! Make sure that you have a wide brimmed hat and wear a good pair of "sunnies" (sunglasses). I have just spent winter in the north of Australia and even then got sunburnt one day not noticing the heat of the day. SO. take care and be aware.But also enjoy this country as it is a fantastic place to visit and live.

    Related to:
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    • Water Sports
    • Beaches

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    ALWAYS SWIM BETWEEN THE FLAGS AT BEACHES

    by DennyP Written Nov 23, 2011

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    Australia has some of the most pristine and lovely beaches in the world...Swimming although lots of family fun and excercise it is not without its dangers. BE WATER SMART
    .Most of the citiies beaches are patrolled by lifesavers . This is a long Aussie tradition..these lifesavers set out red/yellow flags each day that denotes the safe areas for swimmers. Swimmers only are permitted in these designated swim areas.
    Being open to the ocean Mother Nature plays her part also and there are some nasties to watch out for. The east coast gets a lot of stingers (known locally as blue bottles) that come in on the tide ...they are a little blue bubble that has a very painful tail that trails in the water these tails are extremely painful if the get caught around your body. If stung go immediately to the Surf Club for medical attention. Usually the beach will be signposted if they are present.

    Related to:
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    • Surfing
    • Beaches

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    Sharks - reality and myth

    by iandsmith Written Nov 21, 2011

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    Sharks are one of the things that newspapers love to throw on the front page; guaranteed to get everyone looking. I vividly remember in one paper that I don't rate very highly at all, the Daily Telegraph, that they had a picture of a man who'd been attacked by a shark. Turns out it was a Wobbegong and its tiny mouth put a small wound in his leg - yet they made out it was sensational.
    Sharks do attack people, that is a fact. When you're in their environment there is a chance it may happen. However, if you take simple precautions your chances are so slim as to be negligible.
    Things to avoid are poor weather conditions, particularly very late afternoon. If visibility is poor for you, it is for the shark and they are more reliant on other senses so they may well come and bite you to see if you're okay to eat.
    If you are swimming alone your chances are also increased. Avoid estuaries because they are places where lots of fish, and thus sharks, feed.
    Having said all that I surfed for over a decade and both my sons do as well and we're all still here.
    The main problem shark on the east coast is the bull shark; on southern Australian beaches and Western Australian it is the white pointer. Most attacks take place on beaches where there are few people, you have been warned.

    Related to:
    • Surfing
    • Fishing
    • Diving and Snorkeling

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    Snake bite

    by iandsmith Updated Nov 21, 2011

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    It's 2007 and two people have died within two months of snake bite. One was a teenage youth and the other an experienced snake handler.
    Why did they both die? Why did they both have to die.
    They did one thing in common. One thing you are told never to do. DON'T PICK UP SNAKES!
    The youth had a brown snake, of the type I took a picture of here on the Great Ocean Road, and tried to wrap it in his T-shirt.
    The handler picked up a relatively harmless snake but was bitten and suffered an allergic reaction to the bite.
    I can't emphasise enough - leave them alone and they will leave you alone.
    As you can see in the Copperhead photo, I was able to take several shots while he was right next to me. Just don't get too close and don't provoke them and you'll be okay.

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    • National/State Park
    • Hiking and Walking

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    DRIVE WISELY AND DRIVE SAFELY IN OZ

    by DennyP Updated Sep 27, 2011

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    PROTECT THE WILDLIFE A lot of visitors that come to Australia are certainly not used to driving to the conditions that they find here and that are needed...being used mainly to city driving it is my experience that a lot of foreign visitors have never driven in "outback" type conditions before and consequently, by driving too fast ..they have bad accidents...some of these accidents are caused by hitting or swerving to avoid wildlife..These accidents quite often happen in isolated areas and can have disaterous consequences..The most dangerous time to drive is at dusk when native wildlife comes out to forrage for food.I always make sure when driving in the country that I am off the road and into a camping area before dusk..The Australian road system is a very dangerous place for wildlife. Please take notice of wildlife advisory road signs.
    SLOW DOWN IN ISOLATED AREAS ..AS THIS IS WHERE YOU WILL MOST LIKELY COME IN CONTACT WITH WILDLIFE

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    Entering Australia: Customs Awareness

    by xuessium Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Australia wages a tough war against travellers bringing items into Australia that may harm their extensive agricultural and livestock industries.

    The top concern has always been travellers trying to sneak in food items and items from flora or fauna origins. Australian customs forbids travellers from bringing in food items of fruit, vegetable, dairy (including egg) or meat origins as well as souvenirs made from plants, especially from unprocessed wood. As Asians tend to travel around with some food in the luggage and few Asian countries having many restrictions on food travel, Australian customs laws are a rude "draconian" shock to the system. This may be something of importance to note. I learnt it the hard way on my first visit into Australia - some of the food items I brought were confiscated. (I remembered a gentleman in the next counter having his jars of tonics and ethnic dishes, I kid you not, being investigated thoroughly by very puzzled Australian customs officers) If you are unsure, declare them in the Red lane. (If you have nothing to declare, you go through the Green lane)

    These days, Australia is so ethnically and culturally diversified, you will be surprise at how many Asian food items have made their way into the supermarket shelves. There is really no reason for you to be bringing any food items into Australia.

    Trained dogs may also be used to detect illegal drugs or prohibited imports. There was a huge diplomatic spat a couple of years back when a Malaysian minister (who is a Muslim) accused the Australian Police of insensitivity when they tried to use a dog to sniff her luggage. As dogs are deemed dirty by her religion, she felt insulted.

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    Your biggest risk: Too much of a good thing

    by tiabunna Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Many visitors to Australia are drawn by the sunshine, so there’s a good chance that’s at least partly what interests you. There’s a trap though, in the endless sunny days. If you couple them with the high elevation of the sun and the clear atmosphere, the result is that you’re exposed to quite extreme levels of solar radiation. So a few uncomfortable facts:

    * Depending on your skin type (northern European is worst) you can get very uncomfortable sunburn, leading to peeling skin, from just half an hour’s exposure to the sun – if you do not have some sun protection.

    * Australia in general, and Queensland in particular, has the world’s highest incidence of skin cancer. OK, the effects tend to be cumulative with time, but about 300,000 skin cancers are diagnosed yearly and exposure to the sun is the main cause. Skin cancers don’t show up until years later, but lead to over 1200 deaths a year in Australia. For comparison, Australia has about 1600 road fatalities yearly (one of the world’s safest). The message in the second photo is meant to be taken far more seriously than it may appear!

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    Minimising risks from solar radiation

    by tiabunna Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Here’s how to minimise your risks from the sun. For some years, Australia has had a campaign called Slip, Slop, Slap – meaning you should

    *slip on a long-sleeved shirt,

    *slop on some sunscreen lotion and

    *slap on a hat.

    If you do that, you’re well on the way to being sun-safe. The other thing is to not overdo enjoying the sunshine – head under some shade rather than frying your hide in the sun all day, because you might just pay for the consequences later!

    Related to:
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    • Beaches

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    MY INTRODUCTION TO MELBOURNE

    by Amelei Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    I arrive in Melbourne the middle of winter. A friend says to me that she has a friend that would take me in for a few weeks and this would save on over expenses. This seemed ideal to me so i left the TiPi and embarked on an adventure to Melbourne.
    I hitchhiked the whole way down the coast, stayed by the ocean, swam and took my time getting there. Afterall its not the destination rather the journey.
    After a week and a half i arrive in Melbourne looking for a friends place. I called ahead to make sure it was okay still that i stayed. I
    I arrive Tenai's place and she is quite welcoming. She speaks very little english and has the most beautiful Philapino baby with her.

    I was taken to a small room. The place i was staying was huge! It backed onto a park and the room was mostly glass but the central heating made everything warm and cosy.

    Tenai asked a fair bit if i could mind her baby while she went out. I noticed that men would pick her up and i assumed she was on the dating game. Then the phones were running wild. I'm not joking, there was not a moments peace. I would be taking memos left right and centre- all male. Nothing twigged.
    She would come home and tell me of the great dates she had been on.

    Then numerous women would come by with male partners and would disappear for some time. I would make tea and look after the baby

    One night i got another call late and there was a woman screaming dwon the phone that i had been having an affair with her husband as 'my' number had appeared 100 times on her phone bill.

    I went outside my head spinning and saw numerous pairs of male and female shoes near the door. 'Oh god!'

    I called my friend and said 'What the hell is goig on here? . I told her the stories and my friend was mortified. I had been staying in a Brothel the whole time and kept wondering why my makeup had disappeared and some of my clothes off the line, and the phone calls, and the numerous men and why Tenai was out all the time with different men. How stupid i was! And how hilarious the situation!!

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