Island, Bora-Bora

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  • Tatoos depict the family history
    Tatoos depict the family history
    by jelw
  • The Protestant church in Vaitape below Mt. Pahia.
    The Protestant church in Vaitape below...
    by Kakapo2
  • Island
    by Kakapo2
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    Eglise Evangélique de Polynésie Française, Vaitape

    by Kakapo2 Written Jul 23, 2009

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    The Protestant church in Vaitape below Mt. Pahia.

    Eglise Evangélique de Polynésie Française: You see such signs quite a lot in French Polynesia and especially on Bora Bora, as here most people are protestant.

    The name of this nice church in Vaitape “Temple Ebene Ezera de Vaitape”.

    It is located on the mountain side of the main street, just some steps north of the shops, opposite the tender wharf for cruise ship passengers.

    Sunday service is at 10am.

    The Catholic Church is a bit further south, opposite the Post Office.

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    Vaitape - Bora Bora's Main Town

    by Kakapo2 Written Jul 23, 2009

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    Vaitape below the towering peaks of Mt. Pahia.

    I have read contradicting information about the number of inhabitants Bora Bora has. The number varies from 6000 to 7000. Wikipedia cites the 2007 census which counted 8880 inhabitants. So still not a real lot… ;-)

    About 4000 of those people live in Vaitape, the main town.

    Not only there it is sometimes hard to determine where the town ends and no-man’s-land starts, or if some lonesome houses belong to the previous or the next village.

    There is a green sign with the name of the township at the official start of a village, and soon after that you normally spot a church.

    As you can expect, you find all kinds of businesses and public service in Vaitape, including post-office (Bureau de Poste), police station (gendarmerie), town hall (Mairie), school, pharmacy, bank (Banque de Polynésie), Maison de la Presse (newspapers, magazines, books, and tobacco products), fire brigade (Pompiers), petrol station (Station Service), car rentals, hairdresser, etc..

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    Anau – the most authentic Village

    by Kakapo2 Written Jul 23, 2009

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    The Protestant church of Anau.

    Anau on the east coast is the most typical village on Bora Bora because it is the most isolated settlement. It is built along a rocky stretch of coastline.

    In the Hidden Guide I read that it is, I quote: “not a terribly friendly place”. As we stopped for some minutes only I can neither agree nor tell you the opposite. It was hot, and nobody was around.

    Our main interest was to have a look at the Protestant church (Eglise Protestante Maohi; Paroisse Sion, in Tahitian: Paroita Tiona/Anau).

    Sunday mass is at 10am.

    The three major churches on Bora Bora look like cloned, with their pointed red roofs, and the open porch in front of the entrance under the tower. Only the colours are different. Whereas the churches in Vaitape and Faanui have pastel colours, the one in Anau is white. And it is set on the lagoon-side, whereas the other two are on the mountain side, so they are set in front of the magic mountains and offer quite dramatic vistas.

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    The ever Changing Face of the Peaks

    by Kakapo2 Written Jul 23, 2009

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    Mt. Otemanu, Mt. Pahia, seen from north of Faanui.
    1 more image

    When looking at my photos you might be impressed by the many spectacular mountains of Bora Bora. But this impression is completely wrong.

    You somehow permanently circle around the two giants Mt. Otemanu and Mt. Pahia, and they change their faces so dramatically with every turn you take that you would not think they are the same mountains.

    Sometimes a lower mountain adds to the picture, but the highest ones are always only Mt. Otemanu (727 metres) and Mt. Pahia (662 metres).

    The next-highest peak is Mt. Hue with 619 metres, followed by Mt. Mataihua (314 metres) which sits between Faanui and Vairau Bay, and in the very north you have the Popotei Ridge.

    You can walk up to the summit of Mt. Pahia. This will take you several hours (about 5 hours return). The hike starts in Vaitape. You have to take the inland road south of the Protestant church, and find your way through the bush. Either take a guide or get good instructions before you start. And, of course, do not try it in wet conditions, as the track will get muddy and slippery.

    Do not try to climb Mt. Otemanu. Its crumbling face would make an ascent very dangerous.

    A short walk I would consider is the island crossing from Faanui (start/end on a dirt track starting at the church) to Vairau Bay, south of Fitiiu Point. We saw the start of the track on the Vairau Bay side when we passed there on our bicycles.

    On photo 2 you see the mountains the other way round, as you see them from Nunue, south of Vaitape.

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    The different Colour of Vairau Bay

    by Kakapo2 Written Jul 23, 2009

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    View from the highest point of the island tour.

    This bay was rather unique as the colour of the water was neither turquoise blue nor turquoise green but just a brilliant green.

    You have a great view from a lookout off Fitiiu Point. This comes after a steep climb on the unsealed stretch of road, where the road leaves the coastline and goes inland, and before a long descent down towards Anau.

    If you are interested, the lookout area is rich of places to check out. Further out to Fitiiu Point you can walk on a jeep track to a spot from where you can see some of those useless American defense guns. If you look down to the shore you see the Marae Aehuatai.
    (If you want to have a close look, just drive down the hill towards Anau, at the bottom a track leads to the marae - and from there up to the guns.)

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    The Magic of an Unsealed Road

    by Kakapo2 Updated Jul 23, 2009

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    Wobbly ride north of Anau.

    North of Anau on the eastern side of the island, there is a short unsealed stretch of road.

    It also is a short steepisch winding uphill section, ending at the former Club Med which was relocated after being devastated by hurricanes several times.

    As I did not succeed to pedal to the top on my one-gear bike, I could see what the road was made up of . And it was not just red soil but under the soil emerged the original coral road.

    This coral, of course, was once under the water’s surface and was pushed up by volcanic eruptions.

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    Caves at Mt. Otemanu

    by Kakapo2 Written Jul 23, 2009

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    Although you see banana trees in the foreground, let me tell you about the fruit you see as yellowish dots in the centre – and under the spectacular panorama of Mt. Otemanu. Read more about the pamplemousse in my General Tips.

    If you enlarge this photo you might spot some caves at the base of the rocks. They are ancient burial sites.

    You get this view just north of Anau.

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    View to Raiatea and Tahaa

    by Kakapo2 Written Jul 23, 2009

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    Bora Bora is only 72 kilometres from Raiatea, and Raiatea’s sister island Tahaa is even closer.

    You get a great view of those islands (more of Tahaa than of Raiatea) from the east/southest coast of Bora Bora, behind a chain of small motu(s).

    This photo was taken just north of Anau.

    You can see Maupiti from the area around Vaitape. It is off the Teavanui Pass to the west.

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    Develop a Photo Mania…

    by Kakapo2 Updated Jul 22, 2009

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    … at the view of those crystal clear waters that surround Bora Bora.

    Yes, you cannot help stopping every some minutes. Sometimes you think you have taken the greatest photo of all, and after some minutes you drive/cycle around another curve, and you have to get off the bike or out of the car again, and take another greatest photo of all. And so it goes on. You can't count the number of bays, there are so many, and so many points.



    Please do not rate this tip!

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    A Chain of Motu(s)

    by Kakapo2 Written Jul 22, 2009

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    From the north-west of the island you look out to a chain of very small motu(s). Hôtel Paradis is one of the hotels in this motu agglomeration.

    A bit further to the right of this photo would be the Motu Mute, the location of Bora Bora's airport.

    The north-east and the east of the island are enclosed by two narrowish major motu(s).

    This view is from Vairupe Bay.

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    Truck on the Water

    by Kakapo2 Written Jul 22, 2009

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    The inhabited motus need as much service and maintenance as the main island.

    If you look at some of the videos of the hotels on the motus, you see cars driving around there, so even road works are needed from time to time, rubbish transport, building works, etc.

    When we were there we spotted this truck on a kind of motorised float, we first thought it was the rubbish truck, as it was rubbish collection day on Bora Bora. But with the big lense and the binoculars we found out that the truck was loaded with gravel, so it was on the way to do some kind of roadworks.

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    WW2 Wharf or Hotel Ruins?

    by Kakapo2 Written Jul 22, 2009

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    Concrete constructions in the sun.

    North of Faanui are some concrete pillars and, of course, not very attractive concrete constructions in the water.

    As I did not look into my guide book, I cannot tell you what they really were. But there are two interesting possibilities.

    1. They could be the remains of an American wharf from World War II.
    2. They could be the remains of a failed hotel construction which would have included concrete bases for overwater bungalows. In the early 1980’s the Hyatt Regency started a building project in this area, but it was underfinanced, and the company went broke. They never cleaned up their mess.

    As you see, I did not bother too much to photograph it as a whole, and only used the low concrete wall as the foreground for a photo against the sun.

    I walked on the concrete constructions like on a kind of jetty to get out into the water without getting wet, just for better views. I did not stay out there very long because a young guy was hanging around, and he did not really look very trustworthy. So I thought, before he tries to steal my camera or whatever, perhaps even Kimi the Bear!, I better go back to John, and we leave.

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    Faanui - Site of the former Dynasty

    by Kakapo2 Written Jul 22, 2009

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    The Protestant church of Faanui.

    This picturesque church in front of the island’s towering giants is located at the start of Faanui Bay.

    Faanui is about 5 kilometres north of Vaitape.

    The area once was the site of the Pomare dynasty. That is why you find some marae there – or not. As said, there are no signs. So if you want to have a look at them, ask the locals.

    In Faanui you have a good chance of meeting people, as there are several shops and stalls with pareos (sarongs) blowing in the wind. We overtook a tour bus several times (and they overtook us in return), as it stopped at those shops, and the tour group had to get in and out.

    If you want to know more about the church, this is really annoying… Unfortunately all three travel guides I had are hopeless if you search information about the churches on Bora Bora. The internet and the brochures do not help much either. They consider the locations of restaurants and jetski bases more important – and so much more important that they do not bother giving out any information about the churches which BTW are mainly protestant on Bora Bora.

    We did not do any more research on site and left faster than I would normally have done, even Kimi the Bear complained about not being photographed here, but I did not want to mix up with the tour groups and get all those people in my photos.

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    Mt. Hue - in the Shadow of the Twin Towers

    by Kakapo2 Written Jul 22, 2009

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    Beautiful view north of Vaitape.

    From now on I will post the tips more or less chronologically, following the route of our bicycle tour around the island. As said, we travelled clockwise although we had to cross the road to take photos from the shore, as in French Polynesia you drive on the right side of the road, like in France.

    The first reason to do so is that this way round is that you have only two very short climbs.
    The second reason is that you have only 6 km left when you arrive at Matira Point for a swim and sunbath. If you do it the other way round, you have to cycle back to Matira Point, and from there back to Vaitape, so this would add 12 km to your tour.

    It does not play a role, of course, if you stay at Matira Point during a longer stay. Lucky you!

    Here is a link to a circle island tour – unfortunately counter-clockwise:

    http://www.boraboraisland.com/tosee/circletour.html

    Soon after leaving Vaitape you get this beautiful view of rather a high mountain that is never mentioned anywhere. Its name is Mt. Hue and is 619 metres high, and it is not really far from Mt. Pahia and its twin, Mt. Otemanu. And you see, the water is already showing its magic…

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    Things to Do I have not Done…

    by Kakapo2 Written Jul 21, 2009

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    Cycling instead of outrigger canoeing...

    With a day only you have to set priorities, and our two priorities was to see as much of the island and the landscape as possible and have a swim in the bathtub-warm water of the lagoon. This was perfect, as with the slow pace of the one-gear bicycles we got a feeling of the life on the island, and did not just tick tourist attractions with the tour guide being the only local you would meet.

    So things we have missed, including some things we would not even have wanted to experience were:

    Boat or outrigger canoe tour around the island with shark and manta ray watching.

    Go diving.

    Tour in a glass-bottom boat or submarine.

    Helicopter Flight over the island.

    Do jetskiing or wake-boarding.

    Check out the marae. (As we had visited marae on the other French Polynesian islands, especially Raiatea, we neglected the search for those on Bora Bora, as we did not want to miss to get into this lagoon.)

    We could have checked out some of the WW2 defense guns. There would have been time to check out at least one, especially the one at Matira Point, I have to admit… However, in an updated (online) guide, the Moon Handbook of Tahiti, I read that residential construction blocks the access track, so they cannot be visited anymore…
    The Lonely Planet Guide describes the locations quite well. Note them on a map before you set out. The South Pacific Handbook by David Stanley, on the other hand, says that most cannons are not worth the walk(s) – but the views you get from there are worth the effort in most cases.

    We could have snorkelled in the Coral Garden but preferred to relax on the beach and swim at Matira Beach..

    Go on a mountain safari tour in a 4WD vehicle or quad bike.

    Go trekking in the centre of the island. (We would have loved to do this but there was no time.) The most strenuous walk is up to Mt. Pahia, it takes about 5 hours, and you should not go without a guide, most travel books say.

    Sail on a yacht.

    Visit the Lagoonarium (turtles, sharks, rays and tropical fish).

    Swim with turtles at the care centre at the Meridien Hotel.

    Visit the Marine Museum (Musée de la Marine) in Faanui which is said to have nice model ships..

    Visit the Coral Nursery Toa Nui under the overwater bungalows of the Bora Bora Pearl Beach Resort & Spa.

    You see, you have to choose carefully what you want to do, not only because of time restraints. To do it all you might have to win Lotto first ;-)

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    • Kayaking
    • Sailing and Boating

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