Fun things to do in Rotorua

  • A Good Show
    A Good Show
    by rabbit06
  • Te Puia
    by elpariente
  • Ohinemutu Maori Village and War Memorial
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Most Viewed Things to Do in Rotorua

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    Agricultural Shows

    by b1bob Updated Feb 21, 2003

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    The audience was from all parts of the world: New Zealand, Australia, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea, and China. They sheered a lamb in front of everybody, giving each audience member a small piece of sheered wool Next, they asked for volunteers for the next thing. The Lamberts, especially Jonathan, volunteered me to ride a bull (without horns, of course). After the show, Jonathan and I rode the bull together. For folks wondering how I got that piece of wool back to the United States: I stuck it in my shoes.

    My friend and me on a potential steak

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    Orchid Gardens

    by keeweechic Updated Feb 27, 2006

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    Visit the Orchid Gardens to see the Water garden show, fountains dancing and playing to music. Walk through the butterfly enclosure and view the beautiful display of rare orchids which are set in two large enclosures in naturally landscaped surroundings.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

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    The Challenge

    by keeweechic Updated Nov 29, 2003

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    When you arrive, you will be taken outside (usually) to see the Maori Challenge - this is a welcome performed by a lone Maori warrior. At the end of his challenge, the warrior will lay down the 'peka'. Someone from the group will be asked to pick up the challenge, the 'peka' to signify a peaceful meeting.

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    The Poi's

    by keeweechic Updated Dec 27, 2002

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    Poi balls are implements used by New Zealand women for telling stories, imitating natural sounds and motions for teaching purposes. Long ago they were used by young warriors to help with coordination and reflex training. Today women perform rhythmically twirling poi balls at the ends of long flaxen strings. There are long poi, usually about 3 feet long, or short poi that may be up to one foot long.

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    The Costume

    by keeweechic Updated Sep 10, 2006

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    The Maori costume is called a kakahu. It is woven from the fibres of the flax plant. Usually a tiki pendant is worn by both women and men around the neck. The tiki is made of green stone, or New Zealand jade, and is in the shape of a foetus. The women can also wear mako, or shark-tooth earrings.

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    • Arts and Culture

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    The Stick Dance

    by keeweechic Updated Dec 27, 2002

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    Maori stick dance called "E aue". The stick dance was used by the Ancient Maori's to build eye-hand coordination in preparing young warriors for battle. At the end of the performance, males volunteers from the audience will be asked to try the Haka and women volunteers to try their hand at the poi's. Its a fun night to participate in some of the local culture.

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    The Kiwi House

    by keeweechic Updated Nov 29, 2003

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    There is a Kiwi House where you can see New Zealand's most primitive and endangered bird up close in a special nocturnal viewing Kiwi House. The kiwi has tiny wings - but can't fly. It only comes out at night and sniffs for its food. When they do lay eggs, the egg is about a third of the kiwi's size.

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    Geothermal springs

    by b1bob Updated Feb 23, 2004

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    Because of the volcanic activity, geothermal springs are all over the area. The water, whether it comes from the taps or in the swimming pool, has a sulfuric odour. Native Maoris used the springs for cooking.

    geysers

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    Corn like you've never had it before

    by keeweechic Updated Dec 27, 2002

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    Join a guide and have various areas explained to you as you walk around. Be sure to try some of the corn cob cooked in the steaming pools, its delicious.

    They put it in a plastic bag with a little butter for you but it will take about 25 mins for it to cool long enough to eat it

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    Maori Cultural Show & Hungi Dinner

    by rabbit06 Updated Sep 23, 2011

    A must attend is a Maori Cultural Show with Hungi Dinner with many villages and hotels providing a memorable evening. We attended this one at Sudima Hotel were we were staying. It started with a Hungi (Maori style cooking) dinner including NZ lamb, the meat just fell apart with an assortment of fresh vegetables, you will not go away hungry and Rabbit had seconds lol. Also included in the desert's was Shirley's favourite, the famous NZ Pavlova...omg she was so happy!! Followed by a Maori Cultural Show with traditional singing and dancing which was very very good, even having audience participation at the end...lmao. A good time was had by all!

    A Good Show Great! Our Table Famous Pavlova! Audience Participation...LOL
    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Family Travel
    • Food and Dining

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    Thermal Pools

    by rabbit06 Updated Sep 24, 2011

    While in Rotorua you must take a swim or soak in one of this regions nataural thermally heated pools. They are really great for you especially if you have the odd ache or pain like Rabbit, they just disapear or a dip before bed, a great night's sleep......fantastic!

    Soothing! Come On In The Waters Fine!
    Related to:
    • Spa and Resort
    • Family Travel
    • Seniors

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    Waikite Valley

    by dutchboycalledjan Written Jan 31, 2013

    The trip to the valley (we came from the direction of Taupo) is already worth the detour. What a views. Then there are the clouds of steam coming from a crack in the mountain side, covered in bush. We decided to have a swim and ended up in one of the private pools. Well worth the visit: the water is continuously refreshed, you can mix it as hot as you like. The water is clear, a bit soapy. Relaxed while looking over the trees and ferns.

    After that, we walked the "eco" trail to the spring, boiling water rising from the depths.
    The pool features a small cafe.

    Paradise in clouds Hot tub So called Cooling down
    Related to:
    • Spa and Resort
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Eco-Tourism

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    Pohutu Geyser

    by MJL Written Mar 10, 2013

    The geothermal area is very near Te Puia. There are boiling mud pools, a very hot springs and Pohutu Geyser. I heard that Pohutu spurts water and steam up to air regular basis. When I was there it did not spurts.

    Pohutu Geyser Boiling Mud Pools

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    Day trip to the Waitomo Glow Worm Caves

    by BurgerQueen Updated Jul 12, 2009

    Waitomo is 140km away from Rotorua, and since you cannot miss the spectacular "glow worm cave", I suggest organising a half-day trip.
    The Waitomo glowworms are unique to New Zealand, though it is possible to find them in some Australian caves as well.
    Glowworms need a wet and dark environment, they sparkle in the dark to attarct mosquitoes to feed.
    Since the cave very dark, it will take for your eyes some time to get used to it; in the meanwhile a guide will provide you with a lot of info on the cave and its inhabitants. Gloworms are concentrated on the final part of the cave, that can be reached on boat only. Once on the boat you're no more allowed to talk, and you'll be silently driven in the darkness, untill you'll see one of the most beautiful spectacles in your life: the glowworms sparkling in the dark gives the impression of a starry night... priceless!
    The entrance ticket costs 28NZ$.

    Glowworms
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • National/State Park

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    Information Centre Tourism Rotorua

    by Kaynisa Written Apr 27, 2005

    Information Centre Tourism Rotorua is located at 67 Fenton Street on the corner of Haupapa Street and is open in summer between 8.00am and 6.00pm daily. There is also a bureau de change which opens between 8.30am and 5.30pm daily, a luggage storage area, public telephones, a café and showers. In winter the hours are 8.00am - 5.30pm. The Information Centre is also the depot for the national bus and coach services, and a regular pick up and drop off point for the tours and shuttle services operating in and around Rotorua.

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