Ninety Mile Beach Transportation

  • Ready For A Fast Getaway!
    Ready For A Fast Getaway!
    by kotitihaere
  • Caught by a sweep 2 tides ago.
    Caught by a sweep 2 tides ago.
    by kotitihaere
  • Waipapakauri Onramp
    Waipapakauri Onramp
    by kotitihaere

Best Rated Transportation in Ninety Mile Beach

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    Rules for Driving On the Tohe (90Mile Beach) Pt 1

    by kotitihaere Updated Mar 24, 2006

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    Caught by a sweep 2 tides ago.

    Make sure you have a shovel with you - while you may not need it you would not want to be stuck without one.

    If you see anyone in trouble - stop and get out and help - the next time that could be you.

    Do not speed out there - it is far more dangerous than any road and while it may look tempting to speed, the locals who often use this as an alternative road don't so that should tell you something.

    Do not drive too close to the sand dunes - the sand is soft here and you will get stuck.

    Do not drive in the water - there are waves known as sweeps that can rush in and literally sweep you away - sometimes you may be able to see the roof of a car buried in the sand.

    Drive about half way between the soft sand and the water mark - following in others tyre tracks is always a good idea as you will be able to tell from their tyre tracks if they have hit soft sand - the tracks get deeper.

    Sometimes there will be "speed humps" or "speed hollows" in the sand - take these at an angle as taking them straight on can cause the front axle to snap.

    Sometimes there is bad corrogation in the sand, travel over this slowly.

    Always take streams on an angle - and make sure the angle is towards the dunes and not the sea - you don't want to find yourself caught in a sweep.

    These Rules Apply To Te Oneroa a Tohe - Ninety Mile Beach Only - different beaches different rules!

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    Rules for Driving On the Tohe (90Mile Beach) Pt 2

    by kotitihaere Updated Mar 31, 2006

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    Local Onramp

    Keep an eye out for the wild life - often you can see penguins and other sea birds as well as sometimes sting rays and the occasional whale or shark stranded. If these creatures are still alive, help them back into the sea, or if you are hungry, catch them and eat them - fresh shark is absolutely AMAZING!

    There are no lanes painted out there so you can pass oncoming traffic on either side, but the rule of thumb is which ever side they are going to naturally pass on depending where they are drive, then let that be - do not change your mind at the last minute and try and get onto the other side

    Give way to all vehicles bigger than yours.

    Never make any sudden sharp turns as you can flip as the sand will create ridges and resistance. NOTE: if you are in a 4WD or SUV these can tip easier than a car - YOU HAVE BEEN WARNED!!!!

    There are many "off ramps" but only about 3 heading north for tourists, Te Paki Stream is the northern most one.

    The locals use all of the others but they have the vehicles and know the terrain. You can keep an eye out for them - just look for where there are tyre tracks going straight up the dunes and disappearing (See Photo)

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    Rules for Driving Te Paki Stream

    by kotitihaere Updated Mar 24, 2006

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    Car Wash - Local Style

    Te Paki Stream is the northen most off ramp on the tohe - 90 mile beach.

    Coming from the Tohe, here are the rules for driving the stream.

    Stop on the Tohe and get out and walk to see where the stream runs.

    Drive in about 3rd gear up the stream, avoiding the water as much as possible. You will see that there are lots of places where it is only sand, aim for these and plan your route accordingly. If you need to stop, stop ONLY on the sand parts and not in the water.

    When going from water to stream, or visa versa, go at an angle and not straight on.

    You will notice the dunes on the left hand side getting higher. Sooner or later you will see in front of you two streams and bullrushes with no sand. Find a safe place to park then get out and walk - you need to see which steam is the deepest or if there is a side track that runs on the right hand side of the stream - sometimes there is and sometimes there isn't!

    Once you have figured that out, get back into your car and get a good run up DO NOT STOP IN THE WATER and go for it! If you feel your car starting to slow down a lot, change (down) gear FAST but DO NOT STOP!!!!

    Once through that part you will round the corner and see a toilet block by some grass. Go over there, then park and have fun on the dunes before moving on.

    More information on how to drive on the Tohe and metal roads

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    Onramps For Driving On the Tohe (With Map)

    by kotitihaere Updated Mar 24, 2006

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    Map with the Tohe Onramps Marked

    Here is a map of the Tohe (90 mile beach) with the main onramps marked. The solid red line is main road, the dotted red lines are metal road and the blue line is the Te Paki Stream. Cape Reinga and Kaitaia are on the map to help you get your bearings.

    Te Paki Stream is the northern most ramp - the main one where cars and buses come on or off depending on the tides. You need to navigate a stream to use it.

    The Bluff is the only "bend" on the Tohe. There is an onramp here but you need to know what sideroads to take.

    Hukatere is a main onramp. It is also from here that the photo that I have added with the caption "Looking Towards the Southern End" is taken.

    Waipapakauri is the main southern end onramp where cars and buses come on or off depending on the tides.

    There is another one at Ahipara but like The Bluff, you need to know the side roads.

    It is best to hit the Tohe about 3 hours after the high tide, but just because you know when the high tide was it still pays to check as it could be a High high tide and the water may not have gone out to far. Also, depending on currents and winds and moon pull, the surface can change from one tide to the next.

    Read Tips For Using The Onramps as well as other important things to know when driving on the Tohe.

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    Waipapakauri Onramp

    by kotitihaere Updated Mar 24, 2006

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    Waipapakauri Onramp

    This is the easiest onramp to find.

    Head north out of Kaitaia, through Awanui and keep going until you see a sign on pointing to a road on the left saying Waipapakauri and 90 Mile beach. Take that road and after a while you will start to see the ocean peering through sand dunes and trees. Keep going until you get to the car park and STOP!

    Get out and go and check the onramp seeing where the tide is and what it is like. This is the west coast and can be wild - seeing a calm day out there is fairly rare, a normal day out there is about 1/2 metre high waves about 20 m apart. This is also the Tasman sea, so straight out is Australia.

    It is best to hit the Tohe about 3 hours after the high tide, but just because you know when the high tide was it still pays to check as it could be a High high tide and the water may not have gone out to far. Also, depending on currents and winds and moon pull, the surface can change from one tide to the next.

    If you are in doubt about driving out there, DON'T DO IT!!!!

    More information on how to drive on the Tohe and metal roads

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    Hukatere Onramp

    by kotitihaere Updated Mar 24, 2006

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    The Hukatere onramp is north of the Waipapakauri ramp and south of the Te Paki ramp. It an easy one to gain access to.

    Head north from Kaitaia for about 40 - 50ks. You will see on the right hand side a motel called The Chalets. Just north of that is a sign pointing to the left saying 90 Mile Beach. This is the road that leads to the Hukatere Onramp.

    If you pass a garage on the right you have gone too far.

    The road will take you through the forest - it is a metal road.

    You may see the wild horses while travelling through. If they are on the road, SLOW DOWN as soon as you see them and approach very slowly. This will give them time to get off the road. If there are foals and you don't slow down, the stallion will attack you - you have been warned! They can do damage to 4WD vehicles and a car is alot smaller.

    When you get to Hukatere, you will see a hill to the right. It is worth going up their for the sweeping views of the Tohe.

    More information on how to drive on the Tohe and metal roads

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    Parking On the Tohe

    by kotitihaere Updated Nov 17, 2012

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    Ready For A Fast Getaway!

    When parking on the Tohe (90 mile beach) make sure that your vehicle is either facing the sea front on or facing away from the sea.

    Make sure that you DON'T park parallel to the sea, as those sweeps can take a vehicle easier when they are parked that way.

    If the tide is incoming or very close to either side of the high, park facing away from the sea - you can make a fast get-away if you have to :-)

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