Akaroa Things to Do

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Most Recent Things to Do in Akaroa

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    St. Peter’s Anglican Church

    by Kakapo2 Written Jun 23, 2008

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    A very picturesque church in Rue Balguerie.

    This very enchanting church, beside the BNZ building, looks very dominant as it sits on an elevated position up on Rue Balguerie, just some metres from the main street, Rue Lavaud, and the Langlois-Eteveneaux House. It is painted striking white which looks spectacular against a blue sky.

    It is a timber church, built in 1863 in the then very common Gothic revival style, and extended in 1877. Also the interior displays were nice timberwork. It was designed by A.G. Purchas, a clergyman-architect. The famous architect Benjamin Montfort (who designed several of Christchurch's most spectacular buildings) designed the transepts and chancel when the church was extended.

    The first St. Peter’s Church was already built in 1852 – but in Church Street.

    The church belongs to the Anglican Diocese of Christchurch. The Banks Peninsula parish includes seven churches. Those are:

    St Luke's in Little Akaloa, the Wainui Community Church, Knox Church in Pigeon Bay, St John's in Okains Bay, St Andrew's in Le Bons Bay, and St John's in Duvauchelle.

    Service in Akaroa is each Sunday at 9am, and in the other churches in a rotational system at 11am, as follows:

    1st Sunday - Little Akaola
    2nd Sunday - Duvauchelle
    3rd Sunday - Wainui
    4th Sunday - Pigeon Bay
    5th Sunday - Okains Bay or Le Bons Bay

    Contact
    Vicarage, Julius Place, Akaroa 8161
    Phone/Fax: (03) 304-7051
    E-mail: rorydoe@xtra.co.nz

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    Daly's Wharf - Home of oldest gaffed rigged Ketch

    by Kakapo2 Written Jun 5, 2008

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    The wharf's shed has an attractive conical roof.

    This small wharf will always catch your eye, as it is accessible from the public toilets LOL

    No, really… You just walk down to the shore from the Visitor Centre, and there it is. And it is a decorative feature if you take a photo from the swimming beach, as a picturesque shed with a conical roof sits a the end of the jetty.

    The wharf is still in use for tourist operations. The Fox II, New Zealand oldest gaffed rigged ketch, starts there for its wildlife cruises and sailing. (Daily at 10.30am and 1.30pm from January until May. Book at Visitor Centre or see: www.akaroafoxsail.co.nz, phone 03 369 7245.)

    It is not known when exactly this wharf was built. Estimates are between 1863 and 1865. It is Akaroa’s oldest surviving wharf – but not the first one. That was the so called French jetty which sat a little further north of Daly’s Wharf.

    It is also unknown when the attractive shed on the wharf was built. But it must have been in the mid 1900’s as in a refurbishment in 1913/14 the wharf had a shed with a mono-pitch roof at its end.

    The wharf was named after a merchant who ran a shop near the base of the wharf.

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    Confusing Relations in Captain Bruce’s Cottage

    by Kakapo2 Written Jun 5, 2008

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    The story about the name of this lovely cottage with its sharp triangular dormer is rather confusing as it relates to people named Bruce as the last name who were not related.

    However, the one who built it in 1855 was an early settler, Captain Bruce, who had immigrated from Scotland. He built it for his widowed brother-in-law named John Donnet – whose daughter Isabella married a guy named William Bruce.

    The house was extended in 1922, more exactly: A second building was brought onto the site by sledge from William Street and attached to the cottage.

    This is one of my favourite cottages in Akaroa. Every time I walk past it I am delighted because it looks so romantic with its picket fence and the climbing plants, especially the beautiful roses all over the place.

    It is located in 6 Rue Aubray. This is at the corner of Rue Aubray and Bruce Terrace. When you walk up Bruce Terrace towards Rue Jolie from Beach Road (the promenade) it is on the left side.

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    Once a Bakery, now Fire & Ice

    by Kakapo2 Written Jun 5, 2008

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    This very striking yellow two-storey building in 6 Church Street was built in 1884. It looks slightly different than the surrounding historic buildings. The style was called plain Italianate when it was built in 1884 but several changes have impaired the historical authenticity of the building. So it even faced demolition in 1996, but after a passionate campaign it was saved.

    In the early days it was used as a bakery by the Brown family that had immigrated from Scotland, and was quickly erected when the bakery next door burnt down.

    Since the bakery closed the building has housed several kinds of businesses. At the moment it is a shop named Fire & Ice. They are specialised in natural crystals, gemstones and minerals, gold and silver jewellery. The also import pure Aromatherapy essential oils. Open daily.

    Address/Contact:
    6 Church Street, Akaroa
    Phone (03) 304 7804

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    Admire the Picture-perfect Cottages

    by Kakapo2 Updated May 29, 2008

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    You will find few places in New Zealand with such a big number of picture-perfect cottages from the early days of European settlement. There are so many - plus spectacular two-storey buildings of the same era - that you sometimes feel like walking in the scenery of a historic film.

    First of all, the people of Akaroa are proud of their history, second, the tourism board and the business owners care a lot about the spotless French touch, and third, a big number of people living here are not poor – as many of the houses are just weekend or holiday homes of people who can afford it.

    More so: In 1969 local residents founded a Civic Trust to preserve Akaroa’s history and character. The Trust supports new developments which are in harmony with the town’s historic character and encourages appropriate adaptive new uses for the town’s historic buildings.

    In some side streets you will see cottages which would urgently need a painting job but that’s a very small number. There are no bad areas in Akaroa, as in most other cities and villages. Of course, there are locals who struggle to make ends meet and therefore neglect the necessary exterior works. Those are people who have been living there forever when buying or building a property did not cost a fortune. Everybody who has been purchasing in Akaroa in the past decade is not poor, as property values have risen sharply. You will not get anything really nice and spacious under NZ$ 1 million.

    The one you see on my photo is in 63 Rue Lavaud and is now part of the Backpackers Bon Accord.

    The life of this building began in 1860 as Akaroa’s first Presbyterian church. When it became too small for the growing congregation, it was sold and relocated down the street in 1885, so a new church could be built at its site. It then had multiple commercial uses. It got its pair of doors crammed between two flanking windows when it was divided into two separate offices.
    The name the building is the same as in its early days as a church. Bon Accord it the motto of the town of Aberdeen in Scotland.

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    Feel the Wow Factor of the Hilltop

    by Kakapo2 Written May 29, 2008

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    View of Akaroa Harbour from road at the hilltop.

    This is a very special spot on all trips to Akaroa, halfway between Christchurch and Akaroa on SH 75.

    Having driven up the slopes of the former volcano, you can suddenly look over the crater rim, and the magical beauty of Akaroa Harbour unfolds in front of your eyes. A thinnish long peninsula named Onawe Peninsula reaches into the fiord-like harbour. On a sunny summer day the water is so intense turquoise blue, you cannot believe what you see. The colour looks like enhanced on your PC. And BTW – on a beautiful day Lyttelton Harbour and all the bays around Banks Peninsula have the same magic feeling.

    The inner slopes of the ancient crater spill like thick custard into the water, displaying all shades of green.

    If travelling by car, you might not be aware of the abundant bird life on the peninsula. I know about it and always look out for birds but on a recent motorbike ride I got aware of the relentless singing of my feathered friends, the chirping of the fantails and the full chorus of the bellbirds. Somehow magically, nearly every time we drive back to Christchurch on the State Highway, and down the curves from the Hilltop, one or more of those giant NZ woodpigeons cross the road.

    If you do not turn left onto the Scenic (Tourist) Drive, make sure you stop at the Hilltop Tavern just some metres after the highest point of the State Highway for a first magic view of Akaroa Harbour.

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    Wining and Dining in Akaroa

    by Kakapo2 Written May 29, 2008

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    Facade of C'est la Vie au Bout du Monde.

    The town has some very good restaurants including the upmarket “C’est la Vie au Bout du Monde” (That’s life at the End of the World) in Rue Lavaud. The best local fare you can order is fresh Akaroa salmon and other fresh seafood, locally grown olives from Robinson's Bay and cheeses from Barry’s Bay.

    Other great places are L’Hôtel, Bully Hayes, Harbour Seventy One (all on Beach Road = the promenade), Ma Maison (Rue Jolie) and Vangionis (Rue Brittan).

    The Grand Hotel (start of Rue Lavaud) is the biggest place, suitable for functions. The roast meals on Saturdays and Sundays are good value for money.

    Ma Maison Deli (Beach Road) and By the Green (Rue Lavaud) are – as the first name suggests – more deli, pub and bakery style cafés for breakfast and lunch. Ma Maison Deli is also famous for its freshly made real fruit icecream which means: vanilla icecream mixed with real frozen fruit. Delicious!

    If you do not want to spend a lot of money for a lunch, there is a fish’n’chips shop with outdoor seating area at the start of Beach Road, and in the corner building you find a bakery café with very reasonably priced food.

    The only thing I absolutely do not understand about the bakery café is that even in the peak season they close at 3pm or 3.30pm when you still feel in the mood of having a coffee and a cake. But obviously they make so much money in the earlier hours that they can afford to shut out lots of potential customers.

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    Get your Painting done by Charles Meryon

    by Kakapo2 Updated May 29, 2008

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    A French painter at the Place de la Poste.
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    Charles Meyron (1821 to 1868) was lieutenant on board the French navel ship “Le Rhin” (The Rhine), and on station in Akaroa from 1843 to 1846. But he was also a well-known artist and an engraver whose later works in Paris reflect the influence of his stay in New Zealand. One of his etchings named “Pointe Dite des Charbonniers” is on display in the Akaroa Museum.

    This sculpture is a lovely hommage to this artist which perfectly fits into the French atmosphere of Akaroa. It could not be more French, giving a feeling of Montparnasse ;-)

    It is located at the “Place de la Poste”, next to the War Memorial – and you will surely walk past as the public toilets are between Rue Lavaud and the waterfront LOL
    Look through the frame and get your portrait Akaroa style – as you can see it on Photo 2 ;-)

    At times you might not spot Charles Meryon but only his painting tools. In this case he will not be back after lunch. It happens when he needs some thorougher restauration ;-)

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    Explore Akaroa on little Walks

    by Kakapo2 Updated May 29, 2008

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    Have a break at the promenade.
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    Akaroa is small enough to be explored on foot. There are several carparks and parking along the streets – and this can be very busy on summer weekends.

    The esplanade (Beach Road) is the main area for enjoying the seaside combined with the convenience of having a coffee or meal. Although slow one-way traffic is allowed the wide footpath along the waterfront and along the shops, cafés and restaurants invite to a stroll, or sit down and enjoy the views and the sunshine. The Norfolk pines, thick palm trees, and pohutukawas add to the very picturesque atmosphere.

    At the end of this promenade is the wharf where the dolphin tours and cruises start. You see it from afar as a striking blue building sits on the wharf. There is a blue pearl shop and outlets of the tours (the wetsuits for Swimming with the Dolphins are stored there).

    A little further down the harbour is a boat ramp and the historic lighthouse, operated from 1879 and relocated from the heads of the harbour to its present site in 1981.

    The following stretch is a waterskiing area (Glen Bay), and at the end of this you find the Britomart Memorial, at Greens Point. This is the site where the British claimed sovereignty over Banks Peninsula.

    The French settlers’ landing place was at the start of the promenade, roughly opposite the Fire Station.

    The beach between the promenade and the War Memorial and Visitor Centre is called a swimming beach but I do not consider it very exciting. It is just a narrow pebbly stretch which disappears at high tide. Canada geese love to forage for food there. A footpath along the main road leads to the northern part of Akaroa (where you came from, when arriving from Christchurch).

    This part of the town has taken off lately, with little restaurants and cafés all over the place. Some years ago there were several interesting shops and galleries, the upmarket restaurant named “C’est la Vie au Bout du Monde”, and the Grand Hotel, but now you find food and refreshments everywhere. In this area (Rue Lavaud) you also find the famous Langlois-Eteveneaux House, the historic Court House, the Museum and Visitor Centre, and several nice old churches.

    Walking up Rue Balguerie (opposite the Visitor Centre) you get to the Giant’s House which is a place of sensational mosaic art, and also a walk up Rue Grehan, mostly along Grehan Stream, is very nice.

    On my “aerial” view photo in General tips I have added the names of some of those places, so you get an idea of the layout of the town.

    Photo 2 is a wider shot of the promenade. It highlights the Norfolk Pines along the street.

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    Stop at Lookouts along the Scenic Drive

    by Kakapo2 Updated May 29, 2008

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    Enjoying the views with my friend Dani.

    As said in my information about the roads on Banks Peninsula (in General tips), stop instead of crash if you really want to fully enjoy the spectacular views of Banks Peninsula, especially along the Scenic Drive which is a summit road that meanders around Akaroa Harbour at high altitude. In some parts you have the view of the harbour on one side and to one or more of the northern and eastern bays on the other side of the road.

    Taking the fantastic scenery into account, quite some special lookouts with nice seats have been created along the road, as it is rather dangerous and sometimes impossible to stop for taking a picture. Have a break, soak in the fresh air, and enjoy the unforgettable views.

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    Historic Lighthouse

    by HuggieSam Written Sep 8, 2007

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    The Historic Lighthouse is a very nice place to visit when the sun is shining and not many people are around. It is incredibly peaceful and you can listen to the many different types of birds who live in the Garden of Tane. We were even visited by a cat while we ate our lunch and looked out at the pretty views.

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    Drive the ridge above the city

    by ATXtraveler Written Jul 29, 2007

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    View from Summit Road in Akaroa

    Akaroa is based in the valley of a surrounding mountain chain. There are two separate paths that lead in and out of Akaroa, and both offer unique perspectives along with their gorgeous views.

    The main highway (75) will give you a direct shot into town, and is effective if you are driving there at night and just want to get there. If you are looking for a daytime drive however, I would recommend taking the slightly longer way around Summit Road, and enjoy the beautiful view from above.

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    Convert to Catholicism at St. Patrick's

    by ATXtraveler Written Jul 29, 2007

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    St. Patrick is a guy that most people can identify with, if only on March 17th every year. In Akaroa however, he is well known through his small but beautiful church. Situated on the main drag right before town, this powerful little green building is the emerald of the architectural landscape in Akaroa. Make sure to stop by, say a Hail Mary, or just reflect or genuflect on the day you had in beautiful Akaroa.

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    Check Out This Colourful House

    by Aidy_p Written Jun 29, 2007
    Ain't It Lovely?

    The house is located pretty near the sea (Anywhere in Akaroa is near the sea since it's a small town). Saw a picture of this house in some travel books and thought that it's a rather cute and nice abode. Didn't get to speak to the owner though.

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    Rolling Locks and Lovely Wharf

    by Aidy_p Written Jun 29, 2007
    View of the Wharf
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    Even though it's a small town, the tourists still does not kill the serenity of the place. We stopped by their main wharf and was totally awed by the beauty of the place. Not to mention the fresh morning air.

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Akaroa Things to Do

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