Unique Places in Dunedin

  • Moeraki Boulders
    Moeraki Boulders
    by Robmj
  • An easy walk to the Pyramides, Otago Peninsula.
    An easy walk to the Pyramides, Otago...
    by Kakapo2
  • Always a refreshing walk home in Dunedin
    Always a refreshing walk home in Dunedin
    by cannedbeets

Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Dunedin

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    The 45th Parallel

    by allikat Updated Feb 6, 2007

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    In the absence of an Oamaru page, I am placing this tip here...

    About 90 minutes drive North of Dunedin, just outside the township of Oamaru, you cross the 45th Parallel. Here you are halfway between the Equator and the South Pole. The spot is easily missed unless you are looking out for it, but by the side of the road in a small lay-by is a large rock with a commemorative plaque. Excellent photo opportunity, and good to be able to say "been there, seen that!".

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    MILTON & WAIHOLA

    by balhannah Written Jan 24, 2010

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    We came from Lawrence and went up Highway 1 to Waihola to have a look, as I am interested in Bird Life, but you will also come to it heading south from Dunedin.

    Waihola, is a small settlement nestled against the edge of Lake Waihola. You can go swimming fishing, yachting, waterskiing and other do other water activities, and have picnics here. On a nice day, if you are lucky, you can get some good reflection photos!

    The Lake is surrounded by wetlands, including the protected Sinclair Wetlands.
    The Sinclair Wetlands are the home to many species of rare native birds, native trout and the black swan.

    As we had come up Highway 1, we drove down Taieri Mouth road, where there are good scenic views. This small village is located at the mouth of the Taieri River, is a historic place where legends of the Maori people are known. Completing the round journey, we came across the smallish town of Milton. The town had a few pleasant surprises.

    We saw some quaint historic Cottages one of the being a "sod cottage" which was built in the 1860’s as a stopping place for miners heading to the Tuapeka Goldfields. It has been restored, and we were able to go inside and have a look.
    The historic Presbyterian Church was pretty impressive too, as well as other old buildings in the Town.

    Milton, is situated on State Highway1, 55 kms south of Dunedin,

    historic Sod Cottage Presbyterian church at Milton
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    KARITANE

    by balhannah Written Jan 22, 2010

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    Karitane was a small town we came across on our scenic drive from Oamaru to Dunedin. A very small town, it is located in a beautiful position, lovely hills on oneside, beach and nice bay the other side. The Waikouati River empties into the Ocean here.
    It has quite a history, going back to Sealers & Whalers that arrived in the 1820's, and built a whaling station here in 1837.

    It is a popular holiday spot now, I can see why, it was very appealing for a quiet holiday! There is kayaking, fishing charters and walks where there is a good chance of seeing fur seals or sea lions, as well as the wide range of sea birds.
    Karitane is described as Dunedin's 'big wave' spot - not for the inexperienced surfer.

    Do stop at the lookout on the hill heading to Dunedin, the views of Karitane and the bay & rolling hills are fantastic!

    Karitane is 5 minutes drive off State Highway 1, just 35 kilometres north of Dunedin's city centre.

    One of the views from the lookout
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    • Water Sports
    • Surfing
    • Road Trip

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    RANFURLY - ART DECO TOWN

    by balhannah Written Jan 24, 2010

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    Located 110 kms from Dunedin is the town of Ranfurly.
    Ranfurly is named after the fifth Earl of Ranfurly, the 15th Governor General of New Zealand.

    Ranfurly is not a big town, it was just a surprise, it had a lot of Art- Deco buildings!

    These date back to the 1930s when the town was developing, and the style of that era was Art Deco. Art Deco style shops and homes sprung up rapidly in the 1930s after the town went through a series of suspicious fires. The two-storey, Art Deco style Ranfurly Hotel, complete with balcony overlooking the main street, was rebuilt in 1934. The Art Deco Fenton Library and Milk Bar and even accommodation in Art Deco homes, with furniture of the era, no wonder they hold and Art Deco festival in February every year! The people take is seriously, and dress in the fashion of the era!

    There is a good information centre in the main street which was very helpful.

    Statue of the Govenor General @ Ranfurly
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    Dunedin's Beaches

    by allikat Updated Feb 5, 2007

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    Dunedin has some superb beaches. Head South of the city to places like Brighton Beach and the Taieri Mouth, and find sweeping, pristine, empty beaches within easy reach. Closer to the city are popular beaches such as St Clair and St Kilda. Travel further South, along the Southern Scenic Route and you will find the wilder beaches of the Caitlins Coast, one of my favourite parts of New Zealand. If you head North of the city you can find off the beaten path places places like Blueskin Bay. A little over an hour North of Dunedin is the pretty fishing village of Moeraki with it's famous Boulders.

    Brighton Beach Brighton Beach Tussock Grass at Brighton Beach
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    Farm stay - lambs

    by grets Written Sep 16, 2004

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    Aileen and Kevin are very personable and genuine people, doing their utmost to ensure we have an enjoyable stay. They take us around the farm, and allowing us to interact with the animals, such as feeding these little lambs which have been abandoned by their mother.

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    Farm stay - our hosts

    by grets Written Sep 16, 2004

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    Our hosts are Aileen and Kevin, who are a super couple.

    We are served a most delicious dinner of kumara soup, chicken or pork, roast or mashed potato, carrots, peas cauliflower and broccoli. Enough to feed a whole army and absolutely scrummy. For afters we have fresh fruit salad and a lovely pavlova roll.

    Grete, Aileen, mum, Dad and Kevin
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    Birds, Beaches and Peace on Otago Peninsula

    by Kakapo2 Updated Jan 12, 2007

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    Although Otago Peninsula has a world reputation for the only mainland albatross colony at Taiaroa Head it is a remote place waiting to be discovered because most tourists just do not have the time to visit all the nice places in this country, and those who come to Dunedin and visit more than just the Cadbury Factory cannot do a lot more than visit the Royal Albatross Colony at the very end of the Peninsula, or Larnach Castle, New Zealand's only castle, or go on a guided tour (Elm Wildlife Tours, Penguin Place) or a boat trip (Monarch Cruises and Tours) where they can also see penguins, shags and seals.

    All the other magic spots are there to be discovered by people with more time. I have been there many times, and every time for several days, but I never tire of this magic peninsula where you can watch sea and shorebirds in abundance, enjoy lonesome white beaches and go tramping on various tracks (maps at the Visitor Centre in Dunedin). The loneliness - apart from the main road from Dunedin to Taiaroa Head via Portobello - is impressive. The drive on the summit road (Highcliff Road) offers spectacular views. No exit dirt roads lead down to the beaches or at least to parking areas from where you can walk to the beaches. If you are lucky you will spot penguins and seals, especially at Alan's Beach and Sandfly Bay (penguin hide) which you reach on a walk over fabulous white sand dunes - the way back is steep uphill in the sand...

    Birdwatching is fantastic from around the two inlets (Hoopers and Papanui), you see them all, from kingfisher to masked lapwing, from oystercatcher to black swan.

    And then there is still more to discover in even more remote spots like Cape Saunders.

    More about penguin places, the albatross colony and other birds on my "What to do" tips.

    Loneliness high over the Papanui Inlet. Sandfly Bay: White sand dunes, penguins and seals. Shags on a quiet morning near Glenfalloch Gardens. Kingfisher at Hoopers Inlet. Sheep at Cape Saunders.
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    • Birdwatching
    • Beaches

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    Walks around Dunedin and on Otago Peninsula

    by Kakapo2 Written Feb 5, 2007

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    With a little bit of imagination you will find out where the walks on Otago Peninsula start, and then you just have to follow the signs. For tramping in the hills north of Dunedin you will need a map, otherwise you will not make your way to the tracks. I purchased the "Walking Guide to Dunedin" for NZ$3.50 (2006) at the Visitor Centre on the Octagon.

    The map holds exact descriptions of the 13 walks, and gives information about animals and plants. And last but not least, with this map you will be able to navigate your way by car to the top of Mt. Cargill which offers a fantastic view over the whole area. (It is the access to the A.H. Reed walk.)

    My favourite walks, however, are on Otago Peninsula.

    The Sandfly Bay walk (via Highcliff Rd, turn right at Seal Point Rd) really is something. First thing from the carpark you have to walk down a steeeeeeep sand dune. Some people take a plastic bag and slide down on it. Cross over to the beach at the bottom and walk along the sea. Then follow the sign uphill through the dunes to the penguin hide at the end of the beach. If you are lucky you can spot Yellow-Eyed Penguins from there and sea lions on the rocks. Take binoculars with you if you have some! The way back is strenious. You remember, the steeeeep dune...

    If you are very energetic you can connect to the Sandymount walks (summit, Lovers Leap and The Chasm which lead to volcanic rock formations). Otherwise you get there from Highcliff and Sandymount Rd.

    A short stroll uphill from Highcliff Rd. shortly after the city limits, leads to the Soldier's Monument, visible from afar. The track leads through gorse, the views are fantastic.

    One of my favourites is not mentioned in the map. It starts at the end of Dick Rd which you either reach from the Papanui Inlet Rd or Weir Rd east of Portobello. It leads to The Pyramides which are two such shaped hills and a beach which is home to sea lions. Along the path are great info signs about the animals and vegetation. The beach itself is also wonderful.

    An easy walk to the Pyramides, Otago Peninsula.
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    Golden Sands South of Dunedin

    by Kakapo2 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    It was no surprise how nice the beaches south of Dunedin are. The surprise was that many of them, between Brighton and the Taieri Mouth, were kind of golden like the sands of the beaches of the Abel Tasman National Park.

    The round-trip from Dunedin leads over SH1 to Lake Waihola which is well-loved for yachting, power-boating, rowing and water-skiing. In an old travel guide I read that at the turn of the century - from the 19th to the 20th - there were even paddle-steamers "for the convenience of ailing or convalescent tourists"! Now there are a carpark, campground, toilets and showers at the lake which is linked to Lake Waipori further north by a tidal river.

    If you turn left in Waihola township the rather wide gravel road takes you over rolling hills to the Taieri Mouth. There are camping facilities, so you can spend some days there or just a day or some hours for swimming - the beach is sheltered by a parallel running reef -, fishing, walking or mountainbiking in the coastal forests. Taieri Island, formerly Moturata (= rata island), in the river mouth can be reached on foot at low tide. A four-hour (return) walk leads along the river. There are also shorter walks indicated, and wildlife (pengins, albatrosses and native birds) can be watched if you are there at the right time.

    Along the coast to the north is another rock, called Governor's Rock. It is said that Sir George Grey once lit a fire there. The beaches are rather narrow towards the north, and sometimes it is difficult to stop but there are always some little carparks along the road. This is the stretch where the beaches have this golden colour.

    The next seaside centre is Brighton. This little town became a weekend destination in the early days of the motorcars, because it was as far as the people of Dunedin could get on a day trip.

    From Brighton the way to Dunedin is indicated.

    A golden beach south of Dunedin.
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    Blueskin Road: The unknown side of Otago Harbour

    by Kakapo2 Updated Jan 29, 2007

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    State Highway 1 - in this region called the Northern Motorway - is like the short edge of a triangle of fantastic but unknown landscape north-east of Dunedin. This triangle which is not mentioned in most tourist guides is like a peninsula opposite Otago Peninsula, and bordered by Blueskin Bay and the ocean in the north and Otago Harbour in the south.

    Blueskin Bay is an inlet with rich birdlife which you see on the left side when travelling from the north, before the tiny township of Waitati. The trip is great from both directions but I prefer it from Dunedin. The area is hilly, with the 680m high Mt. Cargill - which offers spectacular views over Dunedin and the harbour - as the main elevation. Be aware that you can reach this summit only from Dunedin! You will find out that in winter the roads are icy and slippery, as it takes a long time on the southward side until the sun melts away ice and snow.

    Take the road to Port Chalmers, and there turn left towards Long Beach and Waitati. This is the so called Blueskin Road. It leads you up the hills, and depending on the time you have you can explore all the no-exit roads and beaches from the summit road. Be it Heyward Point Rd to a little beach named Whareakeake, or from there down to Purakanui and Long Beach and the Mopoutahi Pa site, an old Maori settlement.

    When the road goes downhill again it offers spectacular views over Blueskin Bay, especially in the morning when the sand reflects the sun at low tide. In Waitati a road leads to a remote picknick area at the outlet of the bay. If once in Waitati you can take SH1 back to Dunedin, or you drive back over the hills on Mt. Cargill Road (which, as I said, does not lead up to the summit!). But it passes at Baldwin Street, the world's steepest street (see: Sports tip).

    This area also offers some nice tramping/hiking opportunities, like Bethunes Gully, The Organ Pipes, Buttars Pk and Mt. Cargill.

    Descriptions will follow.

    Blueskin Bay, seen from the Blueskin Road. View over Dunedin from Mt. Cargill. View from Mt. Cargill over harbour + Taiaroa Head.
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    Out of the Blue: Dunedin - Pt. Chalmers - Aramoana

    by Kakapo2 Updated Jan 29, 2007

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    Aramoana has come to the attention of the whole nation twice. The first time on 13 November 1990 when an unemployed gun collector named David Gray went on a rampage and shot dead 13 people before the police succeeded to shoot David Gray. The second time in 2006 when a very sensitive film about this rampage was released in NZ cinemas, with the title "Out of the Blue".

    There was a lot of discussion whether it was appropiate or too early to make a film of this story, at the end even the survivors of this tragedy were happy with the result.

    What a strange place to go on a rampage. And understandable on the other hand, as in such remote places as Aramoana is you can find strange people who are there like in hiding because they cannot cope with city life.

    Anyway, the village which consists of simple permanent homes and baches, is somehow at the end of the world, at the end of the land northeast of Dunedin, straight opposite Taiaroa Head on Otago Peninsula. And at the end a mole stretches out into the sea. There you find a lot of seabirds, you can spot albatrosses from the colony across the water, and seals are resting on the rocks.

    A winding road directly along the bays of the the northern shore of Otago Harbour leads to Dunedin, with only one major settlement, the port town Port Chalmers which is Dunedin's port.

    Port Chalmers is nice and can be very sleepy. Once I was there on a Monday, and many shops were closed, some were also closed on Tuesdays.

    You can drive around the place and along its harbour, some lonesome dirt roads, sit in the sun and watch the lazy waves, and the islands in the harbour.

    From Port Chalmers you can start to explore the even more lonesome inland and some fantastic beaches. But be aware that you do NOT reach Mt. Cargill from there. You get close but the only access road is from Dunedin.

    See info about the so-called Blueskin Road from Port Chalmers to Waitate in another Off the Beaten Path tip.

    The Mole in Aramoana, opposite Taiaroa Head. A young shag at the Mole. View to Taiaroa Head and its lighthouse. Port Chalmers from the Flagstaff lookout. Dirt and gravel road near Port Chalmers.
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    Farm stay - the farm

    by grets Written Sep 16, 2004

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    As part of the organised trip, an overnight stay at a farm is included.

    Their house is fabulous, with lots of angles and different "wings", all set on a hillside with beautiful views across a small valley to cows garzing the other side.

    The Farm
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    Farm stay - animals

    by grets Written Sep 16, 2004

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    Aileen and Kevin have 3500 sheep, 40 cows, 4 dogs, 2 cats, 6 horses and a few goldfish. We drive out to see the land - lots of area, lots of sheep and fabulous views from the top. 360 degree vista. Stop to feed the calves on the way back.

    Feeding tha calves
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    Farm stay - hunting

    by grets Written Sep 16, 2004

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    David and Kevin go out shooting rabbits for the cats' tea. Kevin is a little embarrassed about the fact that David, who hasn't been shooting for 20 years or more, catchen a rabbit, whereas he, who goes hunting every day, missed!

    When they return, I pick the rabbit up by its ears to have a closer look at it - bad mistake. The dead rabbit empties its bladder all over my jacket!

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