Dunedin Things to Do

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Best Rated Things to Do in Dunedin

  • grets's Profile Photo

    Cathedral

    by grets Written Sep 16, 2004

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    The cathedral is an unsuccesful mixture of modern and old. The opriinal part - from 1915 - is very pleasant, very traditional, quite ornate, whereas the new part is stark, spartan and very plasticy with a pespex multicoloured cross hanging above the altar.

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    Dunedin Visitor Centre

    by kiwi Updated Nov 2, 2011

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    Dunedins Visitor Centre


    I always advise people to visit the Visitor Centre, aka Information Office.
    The one in Dunedin is excellent, and in order to make the most of your time here, take time to visit this place and get information about all the activities and places to see, so you can make a good personal decision how to spend your time. They also hold some nice souvenirs and great maps and brochures on the area.

    This office also provides Bookings for Travel, Accommodation as well as Activities.
    It is a member of the Visitor Information Network, and is linked to most of the country.
    OPEN 7 DAYS

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    Good on ya mate!

    by 80-bettyboo Written Jan 15, 2005

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    The Kettle

    Speight's Brewery has become one of Dunedin and Otago's biggest icons dates back to 1800s. If you ask to drink Speight's somewhere but Dunedin, they will ask if you are from Dunedin
    The Speight's Heritage Centre, which opened in September 1999, is now run informative 1.5 hous tour. Visitors are introduced to the antiquity of beer from Babylonian times, the introduction and development of beer in New Zealand, and of course, the story of the legendary Speight's Brewery. Of course the best part of it beer tasting from choice of Speight's Gold Medal Ale, Speight's Distinction Ale, and Speight's Old Dark.
    The tour run evevryday and booking is essential.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Beer Tasting
    • Study Abroad

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    Law Courts

    by grets Written Sep 16, 2004

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    The historic Law Courts were designed by architect John Campbell and built in 1904, they are the pride of the city. The impressive two-storey stone building has high ceilings and steeply pitched roof. The building has four court rooms, including the beautifully decorated High Court. Also housed in the Law Courts is the Law Society office and library. In the tower over the main entrance, you can find the statue of Justice.

    Related to:
    • Architecture

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    OTAGO BOY'S HIGH SCHOOL

    by balhannah Written Jan 23, 2010

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    Otago boy's high school

    Driving through Dunedin, we saw this magnificent building, and wondered what it was! We were stunned to find out, that it was Otago boy's high school, it opened for the school in 1885.
    .....wow! fancy going to school there, we wondered how many of the students would appreciate the Historic School they were attending.

    This eye catching building was built out of Leith Valley, Port Chalmers and Oamaru stone, and is regarded as one of the finest Gothic revival structures in the country. Situated on high ground with surrounding lawn, it is a very impressive building!

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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    Dunedin Public Art Gallery

    by TomorrowsAngel Written Dec 30, 2003

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    art gallery

    Currently showing:-
    The Pre-Raphaelite Dream Paintings and Drawings from the Tate Collection. This exhibition consists of 70 works, including oil paintings, watercolours, drawings and prints and major masterpieces such as John Millais' Mariana, Dante Gabriel Rossetti's Proserpine and William Holman Hunt's The Awakening Conscience. The exhibition will tour to only 2 other galleries worldwide - the Art Gallery of Western Australia (Perth) and the Frist Centre for the Visual Arts (Nashville). Runs Until 15 February 2004.

    Pre-Raphaelite Dunedin This exhibition of works of art, letters, books and manuscripts features material drawn from three Dunedin collections, the Alfred and Isabel Reed collections of the Dunedin Public Library, the Dunedin Public Art Gallery and the Special Collections, University of Otago Library. Runs Until 15 February 2004

    Lionel Bawden: The Spring Tune The Dunedin Public Art Gallery's second visiting artist for 2003 is Sydney sculptor Lionel Bawden, whose signature material is the coloured pencil. The resulting shapes rise up like miniature landscapes and branch like coral. Runs until 29 February 2004

    Truth's Mirror Witty and thought-provoking juxtapositions of treasures from the Dunedin Public Art Gallery's permanent collection. Ongoing Exhibition

    Ardour for Art Frances Hodgkins' Path to Modernism Ardour for Art is the first exhibition in the new Perpetual Trust Gallery permanently devoted to the works of one of Dunedin's most famous daughters, Frances Hodgkins. Ongoing exhibition

    The Gallery Shop is really cool it has printed reproductions, catalogues, books and cards based on the Dunedin Public Art Gallery's permanent collection and exhibitions, it is also available online.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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    University Clocktower

    by TomorrowsAngel Written Dec 30, 2003

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    clocktower

    Maxwell Bury designed the first of the University of Otago complex of Gothic-style buildings in 1878, including the clocktower and adjacent geology block. Further additions by later architects copied the original style.
    The clocktower building which now houses the bureaucrats who "run" the University. Photographs of the Otago University clocktower are a bit of a cliche but it is still a nice subject with interesting colours and textures from the green oxidised copper roof to the worn rock.
    Quite a few couples have wedding photographs under the Clocktower.
    Walking through the grounds and stopping to sit on the banks of the Leith is nice on a summer afternoon.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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    Worlds Steepest Street

    by joanj Written Sep 28, 2003

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    Baldwin St.

    This is the World's Steepest Street, and to prove I am not making this up, I have photographed the street sign.
    I only walked half way up, (no time to do up and back - that is my story and I am sticking to it !!),

    But for you cricket fans England Cricketer Angus Fraser passed us and was in training, running - yes running up the street .
    P.S. we were in New Zealand for the N.Z. v. England Cricket Test.

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    Otago Peninsula

    by littlebush Updated Oct 9, 2003

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    view of dunedin from otago peninsula

    The Otago Peninsula, a short drive out of Dundin is not to be missed. The road hugs the lake before going out towards the sea with stunning dramatic cliffs. You can see penguins and seals further on the route. Theres also a castle, New Zealands only castle on route, cant remember its name though. You can get great views from here of the city and the lake.

    Baldwyn street is suppossed top be the worlds steepest street! you can drive up and down it anytime of day!

    The Catlins further south is an area of rugged forest and unsealed road and also leads you to the most southerly point in new zealand whcih me being me had to go and see, but didnt realise i had to tramp across a cow field for 2 miles in pouring rain just to take a foto of a crap sign! d'oh!

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  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    ??WORLD'S STEEPEST STREET??

    by balhannah Updated Oct 27, 2010

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Doesn

    Have you been putting on weight whilst on holidays and need a workout?
    Walk up the World"s steepest street.

    Baldwin Street is located 1.3ks from the Botanic Gardens. At its steepest section the gradient is 1 in 1.266. Each year, in February, the "Baldwin Gutbuster" is held. This is when Athletes run from the bottom to the top and back down again, about 1000 of them.
    In July, a charity event is held, it involves rolling 10,000 Jaffas down the hill. Each Jaffa is sponsored, with a prize going to the winner.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

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    Larnach Castle: Visit Gardens of NZ's only Castle

    by Kakapo2 Updated Oct 22, 2008

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    Tiny compared to European castles: Larnach Castle.
    3 more images

    Larnach Castle is only a little detour if you are in Dunedin and travel on Otago Peninsula - either for exploring the natural beauty and birdwatching at the inlets (see my Off the Beaten Path tip), or to visit the Royal Albatross Colony at Taiaroa Head. Either you turn left from the Highcliff Road, or right into Castlewood Road steep uphill if you drive along the harbour.

    Compared to European castles, New Zealand's only castle is a nice little gem but not reeeeeeally impressive, although it offers great harbour views from the tower. But the gardens are - and you also have great views from there. They have planted a lot of native trees, shrubs and flowers, for example the kaka beak and the Chatham Island Forget-me-not, but also a lot of exotic plants like rhododendrons.

    The castle was built from 1871 by William Larnach, a merchant baron and politician, for his first wife Eliza. 200 workmen spent three years building the castle shell, and master European craftsmen spent a further 12 years embellishing the interior with the finest materials from around the world.

    Castle and garden visit NZ$25, gardens only $10 (as Aug. 2008).

    Open daily (except Christmas Day) 9am-5pm (gardens until 7pm from Oct. until Easter).

    Accommodation in very unique rooms with harbour views is available in a building the castle gardens (room rates start at $240), and if you stay there you can also get a three-course dinner at the castle.

    The café is open daily 9.30am-4.30pm.



    Photo 2 shows a detail of the garden behind the castle, featuring a big tree fern.

    Photo 3 shows a flowering kaka beak.

    On photo 4 you see a Chatham Islands Forget-me-not.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Road Trip

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  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    TAIERI GORGE RAILWAY

    by balhannah Updated Jan 23, 2010

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    The best scenery

    We like doing rail trips, so when this one was quoted as one of the "world's greatest train trips" we decided to do it.
    The Train took us through the rugged Taieri River Gorge, across wrought iron viaducts and through tunnels carved by hand more than 100 years ago.

    We had a good time, the scenery was nice on the plains, but after that, we didn't think that much of the scenery and trip. It was quite expensive, and its one that I wouldn't say is a must do, not unless you are train buffs. I would have rather spent the money on something else. We both thought the advertising and photos made it look much better than it really is.
    Whether our view was because we had previously done the Tranz Alpine Train and that was a very good days journey or whatever!
    I will leave it up to you to make your own mind up!

    It has full commentary, photographic stops, and on board refreshments.
    You can make the return journey to Pukerangi, or Middlemarch, or use the train as the one leg of your journey to or from Queenstown and Central Otago on our connecting `Track & Trail' coach.

    We did the return journey to Middlemarch and back.

    FARES FOR 2010 are.....

    Adult Return Fare / One Way Pukerangi: $ 76.00 return - $ 51.00 one-way

    Adult Middlemarch: $87 return $58 one- way

    Children..... One child free with each accompanying adult

    Related to:
    • Trains

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    Larnach Castle

    by 80-bettyboo Updated Feb 1, 2007

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    Castle and Fountain
    3 more images

    New Zealand's only castle, built in 1871 by William Larnach, merchant baron and politician, for his first wife Eliza and their 6 children .Larnach Castle has everything, NZ antiques, panoramic tower views, beautiful gardens, master craftsmanship, restaurant, accommodation, tearooms and gift shop ( of course :)
    200 people spent 3 years to buith the castle and master European craftsmen spent a 12 years embellishing the interior. Marble from Italy, glass from Venice, tiles from England, very impressive.
    It is must see in Dunedin...
    Open 9am - 5pm daily 9am - 7pm from October until April
    Gardens & Grounds only entrance $10.00 Adult, $3.00 Child.
    Castle & Gardens $20.00 Adult, $10.00 Child

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Architecture
    • Family Travel

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    Trinity Methodist Church a.k.a. Globe Theatre

    by TomorrowsAngel Written Dec 29, 2003

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    fortune theatre

    The Trinity Methodist Church, a block above the Octagon, is a striking example of the Gothic Revival. The building was opened in 1870, and remained a place of worship until it was remodelled as the Fortune Theatre in 1978.
    The Fortune Theatre provides professional, live theatre as well as being a venue for the community to use.
    The theatre holds 230 seats in the main auditorium and 120 seats in the downstairs studio.
    The 2004 Season highlights include:
    Agnes of God - riveting psychological drama
    Love Off the Shelf - romantic musical comedy
    The Daylight Atheist - bittersweet NZ comedy
    Netballers - hilarious home-grown comedy
    Humble Boy - English garden comedy
    The Pied Piper - a fairytale for all ages
    Othello - a passionate tragedy
    Home Land - Otago Festival World Premiere
    Lend Me a Tenor - sensational farce
    In 2003, perfomrances cost $NZ25.00 (adult), with various other prices and concessions available.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Architecture
    • Theater Travel

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    First Presbyterian Church

    by TomorrowsAngel Written Aug 19, 2003

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    first church

    An essay in the Gothic tradition of church architecture, First Church was designed by R. A. Lawson to grace the top of the Bell Hill. For harbour reclamation and general leveling purposes, however, it was necessary to lower the hill some 12m before First Church (by then the third) could be constructed. Taking six years to complete, the church with its magnificent spire rising to 54m, opened for worship in 1873.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Budget Travel
    • Architecture

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Dunedin Things to Do

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