Oamaru Off The Beaten Path

  • St. Augustine's church
    St. Augustine's church
    by balhannah
  • Red necked wallaby
    Red necked wallaby
    by balhannah
  • Trimmed Chook
    Trimmed Chook
    by balhannah

Best Rated Off The Beaten Path in Oamaru

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    SHAG POINT

    by balhannah Written Jan 22, 2010

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    Sun baking Seal at Shag Point

    After walking and viewing the Moeraki Boulders, we headed on towards Dunedin, stopping off at Shag Point, which is only another 11kms down the road. This point has lookouts and good views of the Ocean and we saw many Seals that were basking on the rocks
    The Yellow eyed penguin and NZ fur seal is found here, we only saw the fur Seals, as dawn and dusk is when penguins are most likely to be seen, none were around in the middle of the day.
    The viewing area is only meters from the car park, so its easy for people with walking difficulties.

    Shag Point’s most recent history is it was the first place in New Zealand where coal was used for commercial purposes. Mine shafts ran kilometres out under the seabed until mining ceased in 1974.

    And yes, SHAG'S are seen here too!

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking

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    PATTERSON'S COTTAGE @ WAIMATE

    by balhannah Updated Jan 22, 2010

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    Patterson'sCottage

    Waimate is located approx halfway between Timaru and Oamaru. You can turn off route 1 onto route 82 that takes you to Waimate, then come back onto route 1 again, it is not far.....Look for the signpost near Willowbridge. It can be an alternative route between the two Towns.
    Paterson's Cottage........This cob cottage is believed to have been built about 1880 from Penticotico clay and tussock. James Paterson and his family lived here, hence the name 'paterson's cottage.' After his departure in 1893 casual workers continued to camp here. Since then, the building has been restored, there is a sign out the front telling you all the details of the building.

    Stop and have a look!

    State Highway 82, Hakataramea.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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    THE WHITE HORSE

    by balhannah Written Jan 21, 2010

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    postcard of the area and the White Horse

    The White Horse is something that caught our eye when visiting here, it is very hard to miss!

    This big White Horse was made from 1,220 concrete slabs with the head being over 2 1/2 tonne and is on the side of Hunter's hill. It was put there in commemoration of the work done by the Clydesdales in developing Waimate district.

    Waimate is best seen from the White Horse Lookout.

    The monument can be reached on foot via a steep two and a half hour Waimate Walkway, or by car on a seven km unpaved road. (Take a left on Mill Rd. from Queen St. and follow signs to Parkers Rd. and Centrewood Park.)

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    St. Augustine's Church @ Waimate

    by balhannah Written Jan 21, 2010

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    St. Augustine's church

    St Augustine's Church [1872] we came across on our tour around the town of Waimate.

    What a lovely church it was!

    It is painted wood, I have read built from Matai & Totara trees that came from the Waimate forest.

    St Augustine's lantern tower is different! The Bell tower, built in 1903, has a square spire and ornate gables over louvered windows of the belfry. Head inside to see the lovely stained glass windows, some which were designed and manufactured in England.

    Location....John Street, Waimate

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    AUSTRALIAN WALLABIES IN WAIMATE

    by balhannah Written Jan 21, 2010

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    Red necked wallaby

    As we are from Australia, we were very surprised to hear about the population of Bennett's / Red Necked wallabies living around Waimate.

    They were introduced from Australia and now live in the in the countryside surrounding the town with some being farmed. Their introduction to New Zealand came about in 1870, when a Captain Thomson brought several wallabies from Tasmania to Christchurch. Two females and one male from this stock were later brought to Te Waimate the property of Waimate's first European settler Michael Studholme. Since 1874 numbers have increased dramatically, obviously, they must like living here! Their numbers are so large they are now considered as pests.

    Unfortunately wallabies have also developed a taste for swede that is grown in the area, this makes them enemies of the Farmer.

    At Animal parks in Waimate you can view, learn & feed tame Bennett wallabies, and you can also see them in Victoria Park in the animal enclosure.

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    • Zoo
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    Oamaru to Dunedin by road

    by balhannah Updated Jan 21, 2010

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    Trimmed Chook
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    If you are travelling to Dunedin by road, instead of taking the main highway, Take the scenic coast road to KAKANUI, and rejoin the main road at Waianakarua river.

    Just outside of Oamaru are market gardens and beautiful seaside views. Further on, take the side road to the MOERAKI BOULDERS, stop and have a look here. Next stop, is SHAG POINT, there a quite a few Seals that you can see close up. KARITANE, originally a Kai Tahu settlement dating back to ancient times. A whaling station was established in 1837. There is a lookout on the hill overlooking the pretty bay. Finally, DUNEDIN.

    A good scenic drive recommended by the Tourist Info centre for us to do, and well worth it.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip

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    Moeraki Boulders

    by rozehill Written Apr 7, 2003

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    Moeraki Boulders

    The Moeraki Boulders, geological curiosities each weighing several tonnes, and measuring up to 4 metres in circumference, lie on Hampden Beach much as if a giant, weary of his play, has walked away from a game of bowls - so much so that the early whalers named them The Ninepins and the location, Vulcan's Foundry. The spherical, grey, septarian boulders were formed on the sea floor about 60 million years ago by the gradual accumulation of lime salts around a small centre. Their shape is thus caused by chemistry and not by wave action. The cracks in the boulders, or concretions as they are more correctly called, are typical of this type of growth and are filled with crystals of calcite. The boulders appear from the bank behind the beach as the softer mudstone in which they rest is weathered away by the sea. Formerly plentiful, many of the concretions have been removed. Those left are generally too heavy to have been taken away. Though not unique, such concretions are rare, and the area is now protected as a scientific reserve.

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    Moeraki Boulders

    by wkcsmt Updated Feb 13, 2005

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    Moeraki Boulders

    The famous Moeraki Boulders lie scattered along a beach 40km south of Oamaru. They are embedded in the beach and mostly covered at high tide, the almost perfectly spherical Moeraki Boulders are known to Maori as Te Kaihinaki ("food baskets").

    According to Maori legend, the boulders are gourds washed ashore from the wreck of a great voyaging canoe Araiteuru, whose occupants were seeking pounamu (greenstone), when it was wrecked upon landfall in New Zealand some 1000 years ago. Despite their appearance, the boulders were not washed up from the sea, but rather lay deep in the mudstone cliffs behind the beach until the sea eroded the cliffs and out fell the smooth boulders.

    Scientists explain the boulders as septarian concretions formed about 65 million years ago. Crystallization of calcium and carbonates around charged particles in muddy undersea sediments gradually formed the boulders. The process took as long as 4 million years. The soft mudstone containing the boulders was raised from the seabed around 15 million years ago, and the sea is gradually washing away the mudstone to expose the erosion-resistant boulders.

    The viewing platform, just a few minutes walk through regenerating native forest, offers good views of the boulders. If you're lucky, Hector's dolphins will be playing in the waves.

    Please see Travelogue for more photos....

    Related to:
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    • Road Trip
    • Adventure Travel

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  • Oamaru radio station

    by stargate2 Updated Nov 21, 2007
    Radio station in Oamaru

    You can visit many old fashion style cafe, candy shop or even a radio boardcasting station.

    This is an old style radio boardcasting station located near the main street and the train station. They feature many antique radios and recorders, etc.

    They played a song for us during my honeymoon while I was there!

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel

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Oamaru Off The Beaten Path

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