Tari Local Customs

  • Sing-Sing face-off
    Sing-Sing face-off
    by jadedmuse
  • Father and Son and....
    Father and Son and....
    by jadedmuse
  • Local Customs
    by jadedmuse

Most Recent Local Customs in Tari

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    Sing-Sing Decor

    by jadedmuse Updated Jul 19, 2004

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    If you're lucky enough to catch a real live "Sing-Sing" then you'll have seen everything.

    I never did see a true Sing-Sing - one that was orchestrated by the locals in honor of some tribal festival or wedding or special celebration - but we did get to see someone decked out in what would be typical "Sing-Sing" decor.

    I'm attaching my photo which is a close up of the man's face, painted with great detail and eloquently decorative; below this tip is a scanned post card showing a group of Highlands tribemen at a Sing-Sing, and you can see their long skirts and line up.

    Ready for a Sing-Sing

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    Men who wear makeup....

    by jadedmuse Updated Jul 19, 2004

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    As mentioned earlier, the men (not the women) are the ones who are preoccupied with their faces.

    Make-up plays a big part in a Huli man's lifestyle and he devotes care and time to painting his face a certain color or in a particular pattern.

    Seems this is done more to the critique of other men, not necessarily to attract women.

    The women? They're too busy handling all the manual labor in the fields and sleeping in their separate quarters (women, children and animals sleep together in one hut, the men together in a separate one), to care one way or the other, I'm sure.

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    Some Helpful Pidgin Words/Phrases....

    by jadedmuse Written Jul 18, 2004

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    Monin - Good morning
    Apinun- Good afternoon
    Gut nait- Good night
    Tenk yu- Thank you
    Em hamas?- How much is that?
    Mi laik baim- I would like to buy
    Toilet We?- Where is the toilet?
    Halpim mi plis- Help me please
    Nogat- No
    Mi no laikim- I do not like it
    Yumi go we?- Where are we going?
    Kai Kai- Food
    Ka- Car
    Mani- Money
    Man- Man or male
    Meri- Woman or female
    Pikinini- Baby or very young child
    Manki- Older children and teenagers
    Yangpela- Young man or woman
    Lapun- Old man or woman
    Balus- Aircraft
    Ples Balus- Airport
    Kago- Luggage
    Wantok- Countryman or friend
    Bilas- Decoration or uniform
    Wara- Water
    Yu stap gut?- How are you?
    Mi stap gut- I am fine
    Inap mi kisim poto?- May I take a photo?
    Soim mi- Show me
    Klostu- Near or close by
    Longwe tumas- A very long way or too far
    Wanem nem bilong yu?- What is your name?
    Ples bilong yu we?- Where are you from?
    Mi no klia gut- I do not understand
    Mi no save- I don't know
    Tok isi- Speak slowly
    Haus sik- Hospital
    ---------------------------
    ppppssst -- my personal fave is "pikinini", for "little one". Isn't it great?!!

    Sign reads

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    It's good to learn Pidgin English

    by jadedmuse Updated Jul 18, 2004

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    Since there are over 800 dialects spoken within Papua New Guinea, there is a tacit use of pidgin english amongst them, which makes it even a bit easier for foreigners to communicate.

    For example, the sign on the door begins with "TAMBU" which is one of the first words you'll learn when in PNG...it means something like "PROHIBITED" or "FORBIDDEN" ("achtung!)...

    Underneath it, it continues with "No kenkam insait"....."No can come inside".

    How easy is that?!?

    More on pidgin English in the next tip...

    Do not enter....

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    Reverence for the Departed....

    by jadedmuse Written Jul 18, 2004

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    I love this picture because it captures the West meets the East....

    Here we see a man who proudly displays his father's skull on a raised platform...the skull of his dead father is believed to contain a powerful spirit that will ward off evil and keep the remaining members of the family safe from harm.

    Meanwhile in front of this rather macabre display, a make-shift wooden cross.

    Gotta love those missionaries!

    Father and Son and....

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    Tribal Sing-Sing Celebration

    by jadedmuse Updated Jul 18, 2004

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    Since I was unable to witness a real Sing-Sing, I can only share a scanned postcard.

    Notice how the men are lined up, looking straight ahead. A typical Sing-Sing consists of two line-ups facing each other. Off to the side may be someone playing a percussion instrument, but largely the Sing-Sing is made up of swaying, circling and jumping maneuvers, always while maintaining these two lines across from each other.

    The attire is supposed to be spectacular and the men are known to prepare months in advance for such a special event...and Sing-Sings take place whenever there is an air of celebration or a special honor to be marked. Friendly tribes face off in these line-ups and dance their hearts out, and then everybody eats a celebration feast afterwards. It's the major event in the Highlands.

    Like I said - if you're lucky enough to catch a real live Sing-Sing, then you'll have seen a spectacular show!

    Sing-Sing face-off

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    Breadfruit and Avocados

    by jadedmuse Written Jul 18, 2004

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    This woman was selling breadfruit and avocados by the side of the road. We pulled the jeep over so that I could buy a couple of avocados from her.

    If you see someone selling something by the side of the road, it's usually safe to purchase from the vendor (and much appreciated).

    It is also a great photo opportunity because there are usually children mulling about, and nobody is shy!

    Make sure you have very small currency denominations...receiving change is highly unlikely.

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    JawBones, anyone?

    by jadedmuse Updated Jul 19, 2004

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    I'm not quite sure what these were to be used for, nor from what animal they came.

    But as far as photo opportunities go, this one was too good to resist.

    jawbones drying in the sun

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Tari Local Customs

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