Safety Tips in Australia and Oceania

  • Bluebottle stinger
    Bluebottle stinger
    by pedroswift
  • Pelican on his Lampshade
    Pelican on his Lampshade
    by balhannah
  • Beautiful Gold Coast
    Beautiful Gold Coast
    by balhannah

Most Viewed Warnings and Dangers in Australia and Oceania

  • Kate-Me's Profile Photo

    Red Back spider

    by Kate-Me Written Aug 20, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The red back spider is one of Australia's deadliest spiders.
    Fortunately, it is quite small, and not that often seen, mostly outdoors in wood or old pipes, or in old outdoor toilets (prompting the old Aussie song 'Redback on the toilet seat').
    I've never seen one venture inside.
    They are rather tiny (just a few mms) but you can still easily identify them, by the red spot on their back.

    Red back spider
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel
    • Business Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • tropicrd's Profile Photo

    Barrier reef stingers

    by tropicrd Written Dec 9, 2009

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Hi,most barrier reef trips supply you with stinger nets during the season.
    These tours are popular all year round and only cancelled if storm or cyclone warnings are issued.If you can do a scenic rainforest trek too it will be amazing as the waterfalls will hopefully be in full flow.It is the tiny irikanji (box jelly fish) that is usually the problem and our beaches have stinger nets which are checked each morning.Cairns also has a popular swimming lagoon on the esplanade.If you would like to know more about Cairns and areas you are welcome to contact me as I am a local and also Anne12 who is a vt member and lives in Cairns has lots of good tips on her homepage.
    Welcome to VT we are a nice lot of people.
    Hope this helps.

    Stingers in Trinity Inlet,Cairns QLD
    Related to:
    • Photography
    • Adventure Travel
    • Diving and Snorkeling

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kate-Me's Profile Photo

    Snakes, Spiders, Scorpions

    by Kate-Me Written Mar 11, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Especially in the outback, you need to keep a bit of a watch out for snakes. I'd say keep an even better watch out for creepy crawlies, as they're much less easily seen, and could crawl into your shoes or clothes and not be noticed.
    Australia has many dangerous snakes and spiders, the latter including the huge black Funnel Web (Sydney area rather than outback but it may be more widespread), and quite small White Tailed spider and tinier red back, just to name a few of the most common. Don't be alarmed though - maybe just get into the habit of shaking your shoes before you put them on, for peace of mind.

    how would you like to meet one of these??
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Adventure Travel
    • Desert

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kate-Me's Profile Photo

    Ask photo permission

    by Kate-Me Written Feb 24, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    If you want to take a photo of an Aborigine, it is most important that you ask their permission first, because some hold the belief that if you take their photo, you steal their soul.
    Bearing this in mind, you can see how they might get very upset......

    Ask first!
    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • Kate-Me's Profile Photo

    Crocodile Danger...

    by Kate-Me Updated May 14, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This tip is especially pertinent in the Northern Territory.
    For your own safety, don't swim in rivers, rock pools, dams and billabongs (water holes)....even if some might be blase about it and say it 'should be ok'. There have been a couple of tourist tragedies quite recently where this occurred. Tourists get hot and desperate for a swim.... but you'd be better off finding a hotel swimming pool even though it's so much less picturesque than a waterfall. It's not worth the risk.
    My aunt (who after 30 years in the outback should surely know) will not even stand with her back to a water hole, for she well knows just how fast crocs can be.

    my aunt's croc pic
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • unravelau's Profile Photo

    Australia:Snakes, spiders and sharks

    by unravelau Updated Jul 30, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    I am a grandmother now and to my knowledge have never been bitten by a snake or spider here, but they do exist and a bite can be dangerous for you. Every living thing has its place in the world and I guess the best way to avoid harm is to respect the living spaces of these creatures.

    A bite by any one of the above will definitely land a story in either the local or Australian news outlets, so it is indeed an event. Considering the numbers of creatures alive here....far more than cars at least for the first two, surprisingly few have caused anyone harm. So just as you wouldn't walk in front of a moving car, please don't poke your fingers in holes, underneath piles of timber or swim outside patrolled areas where they might be living.

    Avail yourself of the first aid information readily available from local councils and always remember not to panic in the unlikely event that anything like a bite happens to you.

    Shark information available at :- http://www.aims.gov.au/pages/research/project-net/dma/pages/sharks-01.html

    Related to:
    • Adventure Travel
    • Zoo
    • Water Sports

    Was this review helpful?

  • AusPinay's Profile Photo

    DON'T FISH IN AUSTRALIA WITHOUT A LICENSE

    by AusPinay Written May 31, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Even if you're just fishing for recreation, you must purchase/pay for a fishing license anywhere in Australia. Fishing rods can be hired, lure and other things needed can be bought or hired at tackle shops/fishing outlets BUT make sure you purchase a license. If you are caught without it, you will incur a fine.

    There are also a limit to the size of the fish you are allowed to keep. This will be included in the info in the website when you buy the license.

    NOTE: You can purchase a license for 3 days($6.00), 1 month($12.00), 1 year ($30.00) and 3 years ($75.00).

    The best thing these days is to go online and purchase the license as most fishing businesses especially in peak season do not sell licenses anymore.

    Each state in Australia has varying rules for the fishing license so do your research before you go fishing or incur a big fine or even face jail depending on the nature of your offense.

    Buy a fishing license in Australia before fishing
    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Fishing

    Was this review helpful?

  • AusPinay's Profile Photo

    DON't LOSE YOUR TRAIN TICKETS to AVOID FINES!

    by AusPinay Written Jun 30, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Compared to very broadminded Japan, I must warn tourists to hold on to your precious train tickets as train inspectors can really bed very strict and you might incur hefty fines.

    In Japan, there are machines for you to adjust your fares if you make a mistake or you can easily ask help from a train worker/staffer if you are lost or whatever problem you might face there.

    In Sydney for instance, they can be nasty and give you a fine on the spot so be careful and remember where you keep your tickets. Some buses also do not accept money just prepaid tickets as I noticed for buses around the city centre so do inquire with rail and buses offices or at the internet websites for these services.

    Central station
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Trains

    Was this review helpful?

  • AusPinay's Profile Photo

    DISPLAY YOUR PASS (when visiting National Parks)

    by AusPinay Updated Apr 4, 2011

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    When visiting National Parks around Australia, each vehicle is issued with a PASS, which you are to FIX to the BOTTOM right hand corner of your windscreen. It is very important that you DON'T LOSE this pass. This is like cash, so if you lose it, you have to pay again!

    Also, the front of your pass must be cearly visible from the outside. MAke sure you don't place the sticker/pass on tinted glass!

    Another thing worth mentioning is that this pass is not transferable to another vehicle. You can upgrade to from one day to multi pass. The passes can even be annually or up to two years.

    For annual passes, a copy of the registration papewr. bill of sale (for new cars if replacing annual passes) for the original vehicale and copy of the original annual pass. So, make sure you keep the pass.

    In case your car is stolen or written-off, you still need to provide documentation such as a police report.

    sample passes from one state
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park
    • Adventure Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • AusPinay's Profile Photo

    ALWAYS WEAR LIFE VESTS WHEN SAILING/CANOEING, etc.

    by AusPinay Written Jul 8, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    For tourists who like indulging in water activities like canoeing, kayaking, sailing, boating, you are required by law to wear life vests, which follow the Australian standards.

    Even if you're just going fishing on board a small or big boat/yacht, etc. you have to wear vests as the weather can change drastically in Australian waters.

    Each year, a good number of tourists go missing or endanger their lives and other people as well by not following the laws of this nation regarding wearing of vests and/or other rules.

    There are lots of shops where you can hire life vests and other sporting equipment. It is safer to go to licensed shops or establishments for safety reasons.

    Fishing license must also be purchased before going fishing even just for recreational purposes.It is available through the internet too and a more convenient way as some fishing shops in many local areas don't sell them anymore.

    wear life vests when sailing/boating
    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Sailing and Boating
    • Family Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • AusPinay's Profile Photo

    VEGEMITE- LIKE IT OR HATE IT!

    by AusPinay Updated Jul 8, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is an Australian spread, which your Aussie host/s will probably offer you any time of the day - usually it is eaten with bread or crackers.

    As an Aussie citizen who's lived here for 16 years, I still haven't developed an acquired taste for vegemite. How does it taste like?
    SALTY, very salty! Yet, many Aussies like it, who ironically are told to use little salt in their diet. So why is it salty? It is a dark brown savoury food paste made from yeast extract. Savoury indeed! If you like that sort of thing, LOL!

    I can describe its taste as similar in saltiness to shrimp paste without the fishy smell but then it is just full on salty for me still! I first had it 16 years ago on fresh sliced white bread in a restaurant, just for curiosity as offered by my then boyfriend (now my hubby), it was alright, but nothing to rave about and several expired bottles after, I have stopped hubby from buying them as none of my kids like it too!

    Btw, it is spread on very lightly too, beware of using it like a cheese spread, it is very potent!

    vegemite for true blue Aussies is a fave spread
    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Food and Dining

    Was this review helpful?

  • aussirose's Profile Photo

    Australian Sea Dangers

    by aussirose Updated Jul 6, 2007

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Australia has some dangerous sea creatures. Everyone knows we have shark attacks but you're more likely to get run over by one of our many surfies than eaten by a great white. If the shore line is dotted by little bloated blue things with long blue tails, don't go swimming!! They are blue bottles and will give you a nasty sting and welts all over your skin by their long blue tenticles. It's a good idea to keep some vinegar close by to poor over you to sooth the pain. If not, Coke works quite well also. Also don't go swimming on the northern Qld beaches in summer as that's jelly fish season. They don't mess around - you're a gonner if one of them fellas get you.
    Happy swimming :o)

    Aussi Shark

    Was this review helpful?

  • pepples46's Profile Photo

    Wildlife in Oceania

    by pepples46 Updated Sep 6, 2006

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    on the roads.signs will give you a pretty good idea what can happen next. in NZ Pukekos are plenty around..and they made teir habitat right in the outskirts of our Cities... and these days the Kiwi, on Countryroads..though mainly at nite. take care of our national bird.
    in Australia, have a lok at the pix, wild Camels, Wombats and Roo's crossing the roads. the flightless Emu might take you on for a race and just when you thought you outrun him, the whole family joins in and chasing each other, often just crossing in front of your car.
    kadavers are disposed of by Eagles and Hawks and the always present Crows, right in the middle of the road. slow down, let them do their clean up

    Emus Pukeko sign cleaners on the road Pukeko in Christchurch Cokayne Reserve
    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Birdwatching

    Was this review helpful?

  • Freebeacher's Profile Photo

    Just In Case!

    by Freebeacher Updated Jan 2, 2006

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Most Australian cities are quite safe, certainly compared to the USA or parts of Latin America. I never had any trouble in 5 trips. I have hitched around most of Australia but probably wouldn't do that anymore. I think recalling which side of the street traffic drives on (the left) is more useful to preserving your life when crossing, quite frankly! If you are planning on working under the table, whatever you do, don't carry a paper c.v. (resume) on you through customs. In this day of electronic data there is no reason to anyway. Put it on a CD or in an online virtual briefcase like Yahoo has. In the tropical north DO beware of stingers, the marine box jellyfish, that are around half the year, usually Oct. to April. This area includes Townsville, Cairns, Darwin, and Broome. Stings can be fatal. I take great effort to avoid accidentally stepping on snakes, good advice anywhere, but especially in Australia as so many are poisonous. They like to sun themselves on warm rocks. Just try to keep a lookout and don't be paranoid-they try to keep away from you too! Of course, the danger is mostly from having too much fun with locals and your fellow travellers that you will get very hung over and miss your travel connections!! Speaking of missing travel, if you overstay your visitor visa/ ETA, it depends how much suffering you will endure by how long past your visa you leave. If you are only a week, maybye two weeks late, it is usually no big deal (or it wasn't before 9-11) you just leave like you normally would. If you are more than two weeks, you cannot just go to the airport and catch your flight. You have to go to the Immigration office in the capital city and fill out some forms and be interviewed why you are so seriously overstayed, etc. Then, you have to sign another form understanding you are banned from returning for three years! That's how it works. Trust me, Freebeacher knows all about it! Been there, done that!

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Work Abroad
    • Budget Travel

    Was this review helpful?

  • leanne_pearc's Profile Photo

    This really isn't a danger but...

    by leanne_pearc Written Aug 26, 2002

    1.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This really isn't a danger but it is something that should be brought to your attention...Australia is a real affordable place but by researching, creating contacts etc. You are guarnteed to save on money. Yes, Australia is for the budget traveller and there a lot of opportunities out there.

    Was this review helpful?

Australia and Oceania Hotels

Top Australia and Oceania Hotels

Gold Coast Hotels
843 Reviews - 1785 Photos
Port Douglas Hotels
238 Reviews - 633 Photos
Perth Hotels
2314 Reviews - 4925 Photos
Adelaide Hotels
1009 Reviews - 2220 Photos
Sydney Hotels
5884 Reviews - 13841 Photos
Nouméa Hotels
136 Reviews - 353 Photos
Port-Vila Hotels
128 Reviews - 283 Photos
Rarotonga Hotels
169 Reviews - 421 Photos
Bora-Bora Hotels
293 Reviews - 589 Photos
Melbourne Hotels
3380 Reviews - 7613 Photos
Geelong Hotels
318 Reviews - 670 Photos
Canberra Hotels
930 Reviews - 2528 Photos
Nadi Hotels
105 Reviews - 296 Photos
Hamilton Island Hotels
144 Reviews - 417 Photos
Airlie Beach Hotels
186 Reviews - 727 Photos

Instant Answers: Australia and Oceania

Get an instant answer from local experts and frequent travelers

18 travelers online now

Comments

Australia and Oceania Warnings and Dangers

Reviews and photos of Australia and Oceania warnings and dangers posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Australia and Oceania sightseeing.
Map of Australia and Oceania

Australia and Oceania Members Meetings

Jan 17, 2015 
Warm Welcome to Bernd_L from Germany
Oct 07, 2016 
The Big Sydney Meet
Oct 12, 2016 
The Big Sydney Cruise

see all Australia and Oceania member meetings