Getting Around Aruba

  • Walking Through Noord
    Walking Through Noord
    by briantravelman
  • Line Of Tourists
    Line Of Tourists
    by briantravelman
  • Schedule From Oranjestad To Noord
    Schedule From Oranjestad To Noord
    by briantravelman

Most Viewed Transportation in Aruba

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    Get A Ride With The Locals

    by briantravelman Updated Apr 26, 2014

    Arubans are the friendliest people I've ever met. I have been to 13 countries and 24 states, and have NEVER had a stranger offer me a ride. In Aruba, the locals offered us rides on 3 different occasions. We went twice.
    The first time, we were at St. Ann's Church, asking a lady directions back to our hotel, and she said, "Get in my car. I will give you a ride. We live very close to there." We didn't think twice, and went with her, just for the experience.
    The second time, a family who barely spoke English, with children, and a car full of groceries, in broken English, offered to give us a ride to Casibari. There was really no room for us in the car, with their kids in the back, so we decided to just walk.
    We had taken a cab to the Hooiberg, than walked to Casibari. We were stuck in a remote village, with no ride back. We walked up to some lady, and asked her where we can get a taxi, suddenly another lady waved us over. She introduced us to her family, and said she will call a taxi for us. Than she starts talking to her cousin in Papiamento, and next thing she says to us is, "I am not calling cab, my cousin will give you a ride. He is very nice. You are very fortunate."
    The guy, who had family visiting him, took 40 minutes out of his day, to give us a ride all the way to Noord. When we asked him why he gave us a ride, he said, "Because we like to help people. It is in our nature." We told him to just drop us by the beach, and we will walk, but he would not. He drove us all the way to our hotel. We gave him $20, and we were all very happy.

    Don't be afraid to get a ride with the locals, just because of what happened to Natalie Holloway. It is truly an amazing experience. You can learn a lot of information about the island, and its people, and experience the "real" Aruba.
    I am so glad we didn't rent a car. If we rented a car, we never would've known what the local people are like.
    This is the way to travel on the island, so seize the opportunity when you can.

    Friendly Local Local Man Riding With The Locals Local Lady
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    • Backpacking
    • Budget Travel

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    A Car Is Not Neccessary

    by briantravelman Written Apr 14, 2014

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    A lot of people will tell you, you need to rent a car to explore the island, but it is not necessary, and honestly, you will be better off without one. Drivers here are crazy, and the roads can be very chaotic. Add to the fact, that there are very few signs, so you will probably be lost most of time. You will actually see more without a car, and it will probably cost you less too, at least it did us.
    There are plenty of other ways to get around the island. We spent 5 whole days on Aruba, and managed just fine without a car. We walked a lot, used taxis, arubus, took a tour, and even got rides with locals.
    A car is a nice luxury, but it is not necessary, and I wouldn't advise renting one. The roads in the national park, are not fit for rental cars, so you are safer, and better off taking a tour. We saw more on a day tour, than we would if we had a car, because we did not have to factor in getting lost.
    Of course, it is up to you. Figure out where you want to go, calculate the cost of using different transportations, getting there, and than decide what will work best for you.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Backpacking
    • Budget Travel

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  • Hertz Car Rental

    by droid_travel14 Updated Mar 24, 2014

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    At the Divi Phoenix Resort they had a Hertz car rental service. We rented a car for 2 days (Feb. 2014) at approx. $55/day. We didn't realize that we had to also give them a refundable deposit of $500-$600, and it must be on a credit card. Once you return the car, the deposit will be refunded to your card within 4-6 days I believe. We rented an economy car, small chevy spark lite, it was a kind of crappy but it got us around the island and didn't cost us a fortune in gas. We drove it to baby beach one day with no problems, the air conditioning in it worked fine. It was kind of weird, this car you had to lock the doors with the key, if you pushed the locks down and then shut the door the locks will pop up and be unlocked, my guess is this is for safety measures so you don't lock the keys in the car by accident.
    We took the car to the grocery store called "Super Food". It is a great store, great meat section if you want to grill meat at the resort. I would steer clear of the hamburger there, we bought hamburger patties and grilled them and they did not taste like the U.S. at all, had a funny taste to them, the chicken was really good that we bought at the store.
    The local drivers aren't the best drivers, they are however courteous to walking pedestrians most of the time. I'm glad we rented the car and got to see most of the island.

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    Rent a Jeep...

    by ATXtraveler Written Jun 10, 2013

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    I would highly recommend renting a jeep for the day if you are going to see the sites around town. If you rent a standard car, you will only be able to see about half of the sites. We took a full day rental and went to several locations that were only accessible by jeep. You could have taken a car to most of the locations, but not comfortably, and the speed you would have to drive to avoid the rocks would have taken much more time.

    We went with Hertz through the hotel, and it ended up being 158.00 for the day. When you factor in the fact that we also took the car out to dinner, which would have been a $30 cab ride each way, then we definitely came out a head for the whole day's travel.

    10% off for online reservations, must make them 48 hours in advance.

    Jeeping
    Related to:
    • Safari
    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park

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    Arriving by Cruiseship

    by Donna_in_India Written Apr 16, 2012

    Cruise ships dock in Oranjestad, Aruba's capital. Disembarkation takes you thorough one of three terminals where you will find shops, information, and various services. Just outside the terminal you will find taxis offering private tours and vehicle rental agents. The main bus terminal is just across the street. This will also be the meeting point for tours (booked privately or through the cruise line).

    It's a short walk from the terminal to the main street (Caya G. F. Betico Croes) in Oranjestad where you can shop, eat, and/or gamble!

    Main Street In Oranjestad
    Related to:
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    • Cruise

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    Roads and Rentals

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 24, 2011

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    There are various possibilities for getting around Aruba. We rented a regular car. The roads on the west side of the island are paved, but on the east side, they are sometimes sand or dirt (photo 4). You can't really get lost as the island is not very big, but not all of the signs are what you will be accustomed to. Some were easy to figure out (stop, no left turn), but some were unfamiliar to me. A yellow/orange diamond meant that it was a right-of-way road. A triangle bordered in red with a big black vertical line with a little cross in the middle mean that you have the right of way at the intersection.

    I had a little difficulty with the frequently seen signs that had two cars next to each other, the right one black and the left one red. I discovered that this one meant "No passing". And a dark blue circle rimmed in red with a red slash across it was "No Stopping or Parking". Photo three shows an interesting variation on a traffic light.

    You can rent a Land Rover Defender Jeep and go on a Safari (photo 5 - billed as the most fun you've had driving). Or you can get a a fully automatic All Terrain Vehicle (A.T.V.). Quad racer (photo 2).

    unpaved road Quad rider Right turn arrow Road to Natural Bridge Jeeps
    Related to:
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    • Architecture
    • Beaches

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    City Buses-A Great Deal!

    by fitbod Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The bus system in Aruba is so very good! The buses have many convenient stops all over the island. Visible on the Bus is a sign denoting the Hotel area, Hotel or town where the bus will stop. The buses are clean and the drivers are friendly. The cost for a trip to downtown from Palm Beach, which is a good distance away, is only $1.25. They do prefer exact change, if possible. If you get a round-trip, it's only $2.00....a steal! The buses run till late at night also....stopping at most big hotels and resorts or at least within a short walking distance. The streets are well lit for the most part too.

    Visit Aruba!!
    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Diving and Snorkeling

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    Inter Island flights

    by flynboxes Written Sep 6, 2010

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    Unless you have your own boat forget about any regular ferry service to Curacao or Bonaire.
    The non-US destination flights depart out of a separate terminal to the left at Aruba. If you are headed to Curacao or Bonaire you will have to pay a $32 facilities tax..cash/credit cards accepted. There are two other primary competitors to the NAs. DAE which flys ATRs and Folker 100s between the islands and Tiarra Air which flys Shorts 360s and is the probably the best way to get to Coro in Venezuela for the 15 min flight. We paid 401 AWG RT per person for the following routing a day and a half prior to departure..airport taxes/transit fees ($2 if you transit Curacao to Bonaire) AUA-CUR-BON-CUR-AUA. Flights left on time more or less except for our CUR-AUA flight which was late due to late arriving crew. Longest flight is 20 min or so..don't expect food or drinks served on the plane due to the short flights. Staff was very nice.

    Insel Air ticket office in Aruba An Insel Air MD-80 used on the Aruba-Curacao route DAE..the competition Smaller Insel Air plane from Curacao to Bonaire
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    Flying in...the only way

    by flynboxes Updated Sep 2, 2010

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    Want to visit Aruba and don't have a yacht to get you there from S. Florida? Then you get to fly from the East Coast of the US, Europe or Central, S. America. Aruba's Queen Beatrix Airport is served by all major US carriers including low fare carriers such as Spirt and Jet Blue, Copa, KLM and a couple from Venezuela also serve the island. US carriers have their own terminal since you clear US Customs/Imigration in Aruba and don't have to go thru the hassle when you land in the US. If you are flying thru ATL this can be helpful as you may need the extra connection time. Duty Free in the airport is not much to write home about as you can get better stuff in town. Keep in mind that there is better shops in the main terminal on the ground floor..eat/shop here prior to going thru security and heading upstiars to the gate area...there is also a smoking area next to a coffee stand in the food court on the lower level.

    Food Court on ground level with Duty Free An American jet that spent the night..... Gate area
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    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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    Arriving by cruise ship

    by Dabs Written Feb 7, 2010

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    Our cruise docked in downtown Oranjestad along with at least 3 other large ships, the two docks are next to each other. From both docks you can easily walk to the shops and restaurants in the city. If you want to just go to the beach there are taxis or the bus station is just across the street from where you exit the port. We walked to the nearest beach as we wanted to stop by the grocery store and get a little exercise, but I don't recommend that for most people as it took us at least 30-40 minutes, there's not much to see in between the two and you need to know where you are going.

    In addition to taxis, there appeared to be folks selling organized tours and renting cars right after you left the port, I didn't pay much attention to them as we knew we were going to the beach.

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    Independent Travel to Aruba from the UK

    by amapola66 Updated Mar 5, 2008

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    I tried to find a direct flight to Aruba from London Gatwick, but was not successful. I think if you are on a package tour, you would be lucky, but as we are visiting on route to Venezuela, the best price and option was to get a flight to Amsterdam and fly KLM from there. Flying to Aruba was cheaper than flying to Caracas and means the Opra Singer doesn't have to make the long trek from Punto Fijo to Caracas and back to collect us (6hrs each way). It also means of course, that we get to spend the difference on a few days in Aruba on route :-)

    Aruba's modern Queen Beatrix International Airport can accommodate commercial jet aircrafts as large as the Boeing 747. The island is served by a number of airlines, and connections can be made to any part of the world.

    Update :
    The journey to Aruba on KLM was the worst long haul flight I have ever had. Service was terrible. See my warning or dangers tips for details.

    Handy hint : Take some of your own food supplies !

    KLM MD-11
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    Helicopter

    by Kisu Written Feb 16, 2008

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    In Renaissance Resort it's possible to book helicopter trip around the island or choose from many excursions.

    What could be more romantic than helicopter coming to pick you up and take you to a distant restaurant where you could enjoy the night and great food together and then flight back to your resort with "own" helicopter...

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    Several airlines from curacao

    by Kisu Written Feb 16, 2008

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    Oneway flight from Curacao to Aruba is about 90 USD...it varies depending whether you book in advance or from the airport...

    Airlines operating from Aruba are Tiara Air, Insel Air and Dutch Antilles Express

    These airlines have connection to several Caribbean islands (via curacao) and for example to Venezuela.

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  • Buses exist too

    by giselle900 Written Jan 23, 2008

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    Although many people may opt for a car rental and taxis can get expensive after 6 days, the bus routes are a great alternative. They run all through the island and stop in downtown "O". Stop signs are located all over and are easy to spot not too mention the price per person was around $1.10 US. It got us to downtown and the grocery store just as fast as a taxi and much cheaper. I do love the taxis though and they were great tour guides when asked.

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    • Budget Travel

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    Flying into Aruba

    by Dabs Written Dec 19, 2007

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    Chicago has direct connections to just about everywhere, but I could only find one direct flight a week on United so I had to book a layover. We went through Miami, one choice was a 50 minute layover which seemed too risky with the possibility of snow in Chicago and only one flight to Aruba from Miami. It turns out that flight from Chicago to Miami was late but they waited for the passengers anyway. Well, at least I got some good Cuban food in Miami...

    There's only one airport in Aruba, Reina Beatrix, and it is small but the bags took a long time to get to us, it was late so we went outside and hailed a taxi.

    On the way back to Chicago, they said it was mandatory that we were at the airport 3 hours in advance, not sure if this is true. The sign over the American airlines desk said it was mandatory to check in 60 minutes before your flight. It only took us about 20 minutes to check in and go through passport control and US customs.

    I read that they were improving the dining options at the airport, right now there is a Sbarro before you go through customs that looked like it had decent slices of pizza, a Sbarro past customs that had crappy looking pizza for way too much money and a place that sold sandwiches, burgers and hot dogs that had been sitting for an indeterminable amount of time. Do your eating before you get to the airport if possible and also do your souvernir shopping as nothing is cheap at the airport.

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