Getting Around Aruba

  • Walking Through Noord
    Walking Through Noord
    by briantravelman
  • Line Of Tourists
    Line Of Tourists
    by briantravelman
  • Schedule From Oranjestad To Noord
    Schedule From Oranjestad To Noord
    by briantravelman

Most Viewed Transportation in Aruba

  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Bus

    by Dabs Updated Dec 18, 2007

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    We used the bus several times to get from Palm Beach to Oranjestad and back again, the one way fare is $1.30, $2.30 for a round trip. The drivers do take USD but give change in Aruban currency so it's best to bring along lots of small bills and some change if you plan on using the bus and not exchanging currency.

    You can see the schedule on the attached website, the main bus station in Oranjestad was very close to Iguana Joe's.

    Aruba buses

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  • LoriPori's Profile Photo

    ARUBUS

    by LoriPori Written Nov 10, 2006

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    You can't get everywhere by bus , but frequently scheduled services runs to many areas Monday thru Saturday from 6:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m. with less frequent runs from 6:00 p.m. to midnight and Sundays & Holidays.
    Have the correct change when you board the ARUBUS. A one-way ticket is $1.50 USD or 2 Florins and round-trip fare is $2.00 USD. Stops are marked by a yellow "BUSCHALTE" road sign . Regular routes are between San Nicholas on the south-west coast and the resorts along the beach on the north-west coast with stops in Oranjestad.
    Hans and I took the bus to downtown Oranjestad and it was pretty simple. There was a bus stop right in front of the Holiday Inn and the trip took about 20 minutes and brings you right to the downtown bus station. On the way back just look for the bus that says "HOTELS".

    Lori boarding the Arubus Arubus Bus Station
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  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Flying into Aruba

    by Dabs Updated Mar 23, 2015

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    United now has daily direct flights from Chicago, making it a 5 1/2 hour journey for us instead of an all day adventure. There's only one airport in Aruba, Reina Beatrix, and it is small. Taxis are regulated and based on a flat fee.

    On the way back to Chicago, we got to the airport about 2 1/2 hours before the flight, it was very quick to get checked in, through passport control and US immigration/customs. Clearing US customs in Aruba means that you do not have to do it again once you've arrived in the US so we arrived into terminal 1 (United) instead of terminal 5 (international) at O'Hare which is very nice and if you're connecting you don't have to pick your bags up in the US and can check them all the way through.

    There's a bar/restaurant, a Sbarro with pizza for way too much money and a place that sold sandwiches, burgers and hot dogs that had been sitting for an indeterminable amount of time. Do your eating before you get to the airport if possible and also do your souvenir shopping as nothing is cheap at the airport.

    I was able to find free wifi but only in certain parts of the airport were the signal strong enough to use, mostly by the restaurants.

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  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Getting to and from the airport

    by Dabs Updated Mar 23, 2015

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    On our most recent visit to Aruba we arrived in the afternoon. After collecting our luggage we joined the taxi queue which was quite long but went reasonably fast. they handed us a price list and also wrote the fare on the top, $22 to our hotel on Eagle Beach. The fares are per trip, not per person. For hotels on Palm Beach, the fare is currently $25US. Taxis take US currency so no need to get Aruban currency. The ride was fairly quick, 15 minutes at most.

    No extra charge for luggage. Well, maybe, maybe not. When we picked up a taxi at the cruise port, the sign said $21 and our driver quoted us $25. $2 per bag she said, even though she couldn't lift either of our suitcases. Normally I'd tip a couple of dollars at least so I just didn't give her a tip. But the taxi at the airport did not try to charge us for luggage, maybe it's because there's someone at the airport watching them.

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  • fitbod's Profile Photo

    City Buses-A Great Deal!

    by fitbod Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The bus system in Aruba is so very good! The buses have many convenient stops all over the island. Visible on the Bus is a sign denoting the Hotel area, Hotel or town where the bus will stop. The buses are clean and the drivers are friendly. The cost for a trip to downtown from Palm Beach, which is a good distance away, is only $1.25. They do prefer exact change, if possible. If you get a round-trip, it's only $2.00....a steal! The buses run till late at night also....stopping at most big hotels and resorts or at least within a short walking distance. The streets are well lit for the most part too.

    Visit Aruba!!
    Related to:
    • Diving and Snorkeling
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Beaches

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  • Buses exist too

    by giselle900 Written Jan 23, 2008

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    Although many people may opt for a car rental and taxis can get expensive after 6 days, the bus routes are a great alternative. They run all through the island and stop in downtown "O". Stop signs are located all over and are easy to spot not too mention the price per person was around $1.10 US. It got us to downtown and the grocery store just as fast as a taxi and much cheaper. I do love the taxis though and they were great tour guides when asked.

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  • ATXtraveler's Profile Photo

    Rent a Jeep...

    by ATXtraveler Written Jun 10, 2013

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    I would highly recommend renting a jeep for the day if you are going to see the sites around town. If you rent a standard car, you will only be able to see about half of the sites. We took a full day rental and went to several locations that were only accessible by jeep. You could have taken a car to most of the locations, but not comfortably, and the speed you would have to drive to avoid the rocks would have taken much more time.

    We went with Hertz through the hotel, and it ended up being 158.00 for the day. When you factor in the fact that we also took the car out to dinner, which would have been a $30 cab ride each way, then we definitely came out a head for the whole day's travel.

    10% off for online reservations, must make them 48 hours in advance.

    Jeeping
    Related to:
    • Safari
    • Road Trip
    • National/State Park

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  • grandmaR's Profile Photo

    Roads and Rentals

    by grandmaR Updated Apr 24, 2011

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    There are various possibilities for getting around Aruba. We rented a regular car. The roads on the west side of the island are paved, but on the east side, they are sometimes sand or dirt (photo 4). You can't really get lost as the island is not very big, but not all of the signs are what you will be accustomed to. Some were easy to figure out (stop, no left turn), but some were unfamiliar to me. A yellow/orange diamond meant that it was a right-of-way road. A triangle bordered in red with a big black vertical line with a little cross in the middle mean that you have the right of way at the intersection.

    I had a little difficulty with the frequently seen signs that had two cars next to each other, the right one black and the left one red. I discovered that this one meant "No passing". And a dark blue circle rimmed in red with a red slash across it was "No Stopping or Parking". Photo three shows an interesting variation on a traffic light.

    You can rent a Land Rover Defender Jeep and go on a Safari (photo 5 - billed as the most fun you've had driving). Or you can get a a fully automatic All Terrain Vehicle (A.T.V.). Quad racer (photo 2).

    unpaved road Quad rider Right turn arrow Road to Natural Bridge Jeeps
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    • Architecture

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  • Dabs's Profile Photo

    Arriving by cruise ship

    by Dabs Updated Jan 28, 2015

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    Our cruise docked in downtown Oranjestad along with another ship, the two docks are next to each other. From both docks you can easily walk to the shops and restaurants in the city. If you want to just go to the beach there are taxis or the bus station is just across the street from where you exit the port. On a previous visit we walked to the nearest beach as we wanted to stop by the grocery store and get a little exercise, but I don't recommend that for most people as it took us at least 30-40 minutes, there's not much to see in between the two and you need to know where you are going. On this visit we walked into town, there are stores selling souvenirs and local crafts very near the port and then you start with the higher end shopping

    In addition to taxis, there are folks selling organized tours and renting cars right after you left the port. There's also a free trolley that runs from the entrance to the port along the shopping street, if you happen to see it you can get on regardless of whether you are on a cruise or not.

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  • jlynyc's Profile Photo

    Rent a car and see the island

    by jlynyc Updated Sep 4, 2007

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    If you are planning to spend more than a few days in Aruba, you might consider renting a car for either the week or a day. Taxis can become quite expensive if you are shuttling into town, to the store, to other beach areas and to restaurants so having your own transportation might save you some money. Do the math and consider if it's worth it, especially if you are traveling in a group and can split the cost.

    In addition, most people never travel off the hotel route and miss out on the rugged beauty of the northern part of the island, where fewer tourists travel. Unfortunately the natural bridge is no longer around, but the change in terrain on the island is interesting and worth to see the violent crashing waves on the north in stark contrast with the calm waters fronting all the hotels.

    Related to:
    • Beaches

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  • suvaa003's Profile Photo

    transport in aruba, go by bus!

    by suvaa003 Written Nov 8, 2003

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    We stayed outsite the tourist area in aruba, adn did not rent a car the first week. So when we wanted to go to oranjestad we went by bus, and to the tourist area too. It is a cheap way to travel, 2 florin. There are normal busses, but mini busses too, and you raise your hand and they stop. if the mini busses have places for passengers they switch on their lights, and then they stop. We had even an trip with a schoolbus, the driver dropped us in the hotel area. Funny thing was, he took his dog with him every day working.

    schoolbus in aruba

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  • briantravelman's Profile Photo

    A Car Is Not Neccessary

    by briantravelman Written Apr 14, 2014

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    A lot of people will tell you, you need to rent a car to explore the island, but it is not necessary, and honestly, you will be better off without one. Drivers here are crazy, and the roads can be very chaotic. Add to the fact, that there are very few signs, so you will probably be lost most of time. You will actually see more without a car, and it will probably cost you less too, at least it did us.
    There are plenty of other ways to get around the island. We spent 5 whole days on Aruba, and managed just fine without a car. We walked a lot, used taxis, arubus, took a tour, and even got rides with locals.
    A car is a nice luxury, but it is not necessary, and I wouldn't advise renting one. The roads in the national park, are not fit for rental cars, so you are safer, and better off taking a tour. We saw more on a day tour, than we would if we had a car, because we did not have to factor in getting lost.
    Of course, it is up to you. Figure out where you want to go, calculate the cost of using different transportations, getting there, and than decide what will work best for you.

    Related to:
    • Road Trip
    • Backpacking
    • Budget Travel

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  • flynboxes's Profile Photo

    Flying in...the only way

    by flynboxes Updated Sep 2, 2010

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    Want to visit Aruba and don't have a yacht to get you there from S. Florida? Then you get to fly from the East Coast of the US, Europe or Central, S. America. Aruba's Queen Beatrix Airport is served by all major US carriers including low fare carriers such as Spirt and Jet Blue, Copa, KLM and a couple from Venezuela also serve the island. US carriers have their own terminal since you clear US Customs/Imigration in Aruba and don't have to go thru the hassle when you land in the US. If you are flying thru ATL this can be helpful as you may need the extra connection time. Duty Free in the airport is not much to write home about as you can get better stuff in town. Keep in mind that there is better shops in the main terminal on the ground floor..eat/shop here prior to going thru security and heading upstiars to the gate area...there is also a smoking area next to a coffee stand in the food court on the lower level.

    Food Court on ground level with Duty Free An American jet that spent the night..... Gate area
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    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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  • flynboxes's Profile Photo

    Inter Island flights

    by flynboxes Written Sep 6, 2010

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    Unless you have your own boat forget about any regular ferry service to Curacao or Bonaire.
    The non-US destination flights depart out of a separate terminal to the left at Aruba. If you are headed to Curacao or Bonaire you will have to pay a $32 facilities tax..cash/credit cards accepted. There are two other primary competitors to the NAs. DAE which flys ATRs and Folker 100s between the islands and Tiarra Air which flys Shorts 360s and is the probably the best way to get to Coro in Venezuela for the 15 min flight. We paid 401 AWG RT per person for the following routing a day and a half prior to departure..airport taxes/transit fees ($2 if you transit Curacao to Bonaire) AUA-CUR-BON-CUR-AUA. Flights left on time more or less except for our CUR-AUA flight which was late due to late arriving crew. Longest flight is 20 min or so..don't expect food or drinks served on the plane due to the short flights. Staff was very nice.

    Insel Air ticket office in Aruba An Insel Air MD-80 used on the Aruba-Curacao route DAE..the competition Smaller Insel Air plane from Curacao to Bonaire
    Related to:
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    • Budget Travel

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  • Kisu's Profile Photo

    Several airlines from curacao

    by Kisu Written Feb 16, 2008

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    Oneway flight from Curacao to Aruba is about 90 USD...it varies depending whether you book in advance or from the airport...

    Airlines operating from Aruba are Tiara Air, Insel Air and Dutch Antilles Express

    These airlines have connection to several Caribbean islands (via curacao) and for example to Venezuela.

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