Fun things to do in Barbados

  • Cherry Tree Hill
    Cherry Tree Hill
    by briantravelman
  • Limestone Mountains
    Limestone Mountains
    by briantravelman
  • View From Cherry Tree Hill
    View From Cherry Tree Hill
    by briantravelman

Most Viewed Things to Do in Barbados

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    Cherry Tree Hill

    by briantravelman Updated Apr 26, 2015

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    At 850 ft., Cherry Tree Hill is the second highest point on Barbados, after Mount Hillaby. The hill lies right on the border of St. Peter and St. Andrew Parish. The view point lies, less than half a mile from St. Nicholas Abbey, and approximately one mile from Morgan Lewis Sugar Mill. Many island tours stop at Cherry Tree Hill, as it offers some of the best views on the island, specifically of the island's rugged, eastern side. We stopped here during an all day, private taxi tour of the island. There are no actual parking spots. You just park on the side of the road, and enjoy the view. The drive up to the view point takes you through a lovely Mahogany forest. Don't forget your camera and binoculars.

    Despite the name, there are no cherry trees here, but rather Mahogany trees.
    The story goes that, during the colonial days, the property encompassing the hill, belonged to wealthy plantation owner, Sir John Gay Alleyne, after whom the island's famous Mount Gay Rum distillery was named. He had lined the road leading up to his plantation, with cherry trees. This plantation was none other than St. Nicholas Abbey. Alleyne left Barbados, and went to England for some time, leaving his manager in charge of the plantation. After some time, locals started coming over and picking the cherries for free, which the manager was not pleased about. Every time he chased them away, they would come back. Eventually, he had enough. One day, he cut down all the cherry trees, and replaced them with Mahogany trees, but the original name stuck.
    These days, tourists only come here for the spectacular views of the Atlantic Ocean, and the island's ancient limestone mountains. We happened to visit during one of the biggest days of the Mount Gay Rum Regatta, a huge multi day boat race, around the entire island, so we got some nice glimpses of the boats as well. Occasionally, you can see vendors set up on the side of the road, selling hand made crafts and souvenirs. In fact, there were a few when we were there, but we didn't buy anything from them.

    I was told that Barbados is a completely flat and forestless island, but this area proves to the contrary. Here you can get a great look at terrain and habitat, not normally associated with Barbados.

    Because of its great views, Cherry Tree Hill was also used to film some scenes from the 1957 movie, "Island In The Sun", starring Harry Belafonte.

    Cherry Tree Hill Limestone Mountains View From Cherry Tree Hill View Looking South Atlantic Ocean
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    Bathsheba

    by briantravelman Updated Apr 25, 2015

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    Undoubtedly, the most beautiful area on the entire island, Bathsheba is a MUST on any visit to Barbados.
    Located on the island's rugged east coast, the area is named after the wife of King David I, who was king of Israel. Legend says that Bathsheba bathed in milk, to keep her skin beautiful and soft. The area was named after her, because the white surf is said to resemble her milk bath, and also have similar healing benefits. These days, we know that the white color and healing properties are the result of minerals in the water, but the name stuck.

    Bathsheba's most famous feature, is its "Mushroom Rock", which is actually a giant piece of fossilized coral. The bizarre formation can be reached by foot during low tide. I read that adventurous locals and tourists, like to show off, by climbing the rock. This is not recommended, as the sharp coral cuts your hands, and the only way to get off, is by jumping into the water, which can be even more dangerous than the climb, due to the shallow depth.

    From a scientific perspective, Bathsheba contains some of the most interesting geology on the island. In addition to Mushroom Rock, the area is also the site of several beaches, other interesting rock formations, and the island's oldest geological feature, making the area a geologist's paradise.
    Bathsheba's unique geologic features, also make it, one of the most photographed areas on the entire island.

    Although the rough surf is considered too dangerous for swimmers, and deters all but the most daring from entering the water, for surfers, it's an invitation. The area known as the "Soup Bowl", is the island's top surfing spot, drawing surfers from all over the world, and hosting many international surfing competitions. In fact, when we were there, our driver pointed out a female surfer, who turned out to be a local celebrity, as she is ranked Top 3, on the entire island. How our driver recognized her though, I have no idea. It was actually interesting to see, as people don't usually associate surfing with the Caribbean. I wonder if Kelly Slater's ever surfed here.

    In addition to its unique geology and surfing conditions, Bathsheba is also a popular spot for photographers. In fact, it is the most photographed stretch of coast, on the entire island, as it offers its most spectacular views and scenery. Type "Barbados" into any image search, and one of the first pictures you see, is the 4th picture in this tip. Not the exact picture, but the same shot. It is taken right here at Bathsheba. In fact, when I first saw that picture, I thought it was some kind of mistake. I didn't believe this was Barbados, as I always thought Barbados was completely flat, and had no forest. But this picture proves on the contrary. As it's so popular, iconic, and beautiful, I couldn't leave Bathsheba without getting the same shot. And I wasn't the only one.

    Bathsheba was also featured in the 1957 film, "Island In The Sun", starring Harry Belafonte.

    The best way to get to this beautiful island gem, is by rental car, taxi, or with an organized tour, as I heard getting here by bus takes 2 hours. Could be even longer since you have to change buses in Bridgetown or Speighstown. We visited the area as part of an all day taxi tour, with a private driver. Unless you have a rental car, this is the best option.
    We had originally intended to spend a whole hour here. In fact, one of the reasons we went with a private driver, is because we didn't want to take a 2 hour bus ride, or be rushed by a tour guide, but our driver told us, we won't be here for an hour, and he was right. We were told that the place is usually pretty empty, but because it was a holiday, it was more crowded than usual. Luckily, our driver managed to find parking on the side of the road. We had originally intended to hike down to the Mushroom Rock, but it was a bit far from where our driver dropped us, and we didn't wanna keep him waiting. Plus, the tide was a bit high, so we didn't bother hiking down, and just enjoyed the area from above. We weren't there for very long. Maybe only 10 minutes. We just took some pictures and left. There were some people at the bottom. A few crazy locals were even swimming, despite the danger. We actually didn't regret not hiking down to the rock formations, as we ended up passing them by car anyways, and I have to tell you, they look much more imposing from above. Plus, I felt we were there long enough, to actually enjoy the area. Though if I had the whole day, I probably would've hiked the entire stretch of beach, all the way to Chalky Mount. Our driver did stop at one of the beaches though.

    We happened to be in Bathsheba during the Mount Gay Rum Regatta, a huge 9 day long boat race, around the entire island, so we could also see a lot of sail boats, out on the horizon, as well.

    This was by far my favorite stretch of coast, and one of my favorite spots in general, on the entire island. Despite the larger crowd, I still found this area to be quite calm and peaceful, unlike some other parts of the island. This is also one of the few places where we weren't bugged by the locals, or hawkers, which was really nice.

    This place is truly out of the way, but despite the remoteness of it, there is actually one hotel here, and some nice restaurants. I believe the hotel is called the Atlantis. But as much as I loved this area, I wouldn't want to stay here. As beautiful, quiet, and hassle free as it is, the area is way too cut off for me. Even if I had a rental car, I wouldn't want to stay here. This area is perfect for someone who just wants to get away from it all, and relax in one place. But for someone like me, who has to stay active and see as much as possible, I wouldn't recommend it. If you do plan to stay in this area though, it's a good idea to rent a car. Otherwise, it's a nice place to come for a day trip.

    If you want a more detailed account of my visit to Bathsheba, and things to see and do while you're there, check out my Bathsheba Travel Page.
    http://members.virtualtourist.com/m/145955/1923e7/

    Beautiful Bathsheba Bathsheba Beach Mushroom Rock Bathsheba Coast Bathsheba
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    Morgan Lewis Sugar Mill

    by briantravelman Updated Apr 25, 2015

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    Even a short visit to this quaint sugar mill, will make you feel like you've stepped back in time, to the way Barbados used to be.

    There were once around 500 sugar mills scattered throughout the Bajan countryside. These magnificent structures were used to grind sugar cane, which was processed into rum. Today, only a small fraction of these mills remain, mostly in ruins, and under private ownership. The most famous, and most spectacular, is Morgan Lewis, ranked number four amongst the "Seven Wonders of Barbados". Located in a quiet and picturesque setting in the rural countryside of St. Andrew Parish, Morgan Lewis was built in 1727, and operated until the mid 1940s, when the island's sugar cane industry collapsed. The mill was completely restored in the 90s, and is the largest sugar mill in the Caribbean. Today it is the only example of a functioning sugar mill in the entire Caribbean, and one of only two, that's fully intact. The other one is Betty's Hope, on the island of Antigua, but our driver informed us that that one, is no longer functioning. Though fully functioning, these days, the mill is not used for economic purposes, but to perform the occasional demonstration for tourists. I have no idea when these are done.

    The mill was also featured in the 1957 film, "Island In The Sun", starring Harry Belafonte.

    Apparently, this mill is on private property, but our driver took us there anyways. It's such a popular tourist attraction, that I actually had no idea it's on private property, until our driver told us. I'm guessing the owner doesn't mind tourists coming around, and taking pictures, especially since a lot of tour companies stop here, but I didn't want to take any chances, so I didn't stick around for too long. Our driver didn't seem to want to stick around too long either, so maybe he knew something he wasn't telling us.

    Unfortunately, I couldn't walk right up to the mill, because there was a fence around it, and there was no sign of the owner. I was warned by a local guy, not to trespass on private property in Barbados, so I wasn't taking any chances. I only got out for like a minute, took a few pictures, and quickly left, as our driver seemed to want to leave in a hurry. That's why I didn't really get a good picture of the entire front of the mill, like I wanted to. The mill is interesting, but it's difficult to explore, because it's on private property. It's probably better to visit on demonstration days, or with a tour company.

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    St. John's Parish Church

    by briantravelman Updated Mar 24, 2015

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    A top a small hill, in what has been described as the "most romantic location on Barbados", sits a spectacular building, which at first glance, may easily be mistaken for a quaint European castle. This is no castle, but an Anglican church. The St. John's Parish Church to be exact, considered by many to be the most beautiful, and most photographed church on the island. It's also the island's most famous, and many day tours stop here. Out of all the churches I visited on the island, this one was my favorite, and I too consider it to be the most beautiful.

    Despite its beauty, this church didn't always look like this. In fact, it has a gruesome history of construction, and destruction.
    This beautiful Gothic style Anglican church, was originally built in 1645, out of wood. As we know, wood doesn't last very long, and the church eventually succumbed to a fire. The church was replaced with a stone structure in 1660. This one too had to be rebuilt, as it was badly damaged by a hurricane in 1675, and was rebuilt the following year. Less than 5 years later, in 1780, the church was once again destroyed by a hurricane. The church was again rebuilt, and managed to last a few decades. But of course it was destroyed once again, in 1831, by the largest hurricane ever to hit the island, which destroyed all but three of the island's churches. Of course, it was rebuilt, and thankfully no major hurricanes have hit the island since, therefore, the church we see today, dates from 1836. It's beautiful stained glass windows were added much later, in 1907.
    The current church sort of resembles a European castle.

    The church was open, so we did go inside, but the interior, in my opinion, wasn't anything spectacular. The main feature is its organ loft, which is a large interest to tourists visiting the church, and the only thing inside that's really worth seeing.

    The church also has a nice cemetery, which is an attraction in itself, and also worth seeing. Our driver told us, this is where all the "rich" islanders are buried, which is clearly obvious from the large size of the graves.

    I addition to its cemetery and organ loft, the church's hilltop location, and close proximity to the ocean, makes for some beautiful views of the island's east coast.

    Believe it or not, this church even has a connection to Constantinople. The church's cemetery is the final resting place of Fernando Paleologus, a direct descendent of Emperor Constantine the Great. Though I'm not exactly sure how or why he ended up here, Paleologus came to Barbados in the 1600s. He lived on the island for 20 years, and was a planter, plantation owner, and warden of this church, as is stated on his tombstone. But by far the most amazing aspect of this story, is what happened after his death. Paleologus died on October 3, 1678, and even in death, he managed to move around. His original burial site was actually at another location. After the great hurricane of 1831, Paleologus's body was found embedded in quicklime, with his head facing west, in accordance with Eastern Orthodox tradition. After the incident, his body was moved to its present location, in the church's cemetery.

    This is another one of those places we visited with our private driver, as getting here by bus is a bit difficult.

    Despite its beauty, the church is a bit too out of the way to make a special trip to, unless you're staying in Bathsheba, so this is another place I would recommend stopping at, if you're visiting some other places in the area. It's best to have a rental car or driver, though a driver is better, as our driver told us, this is another one of those places that can be a bit difficult to find on your own. Several island tours stop here as well.

    You probably think that I wouldn't have any complaints about such a wonderful place like this, right? Wrong. Although I can't complain about the church, and the beautiful grounds, I am sad to tell you that even here, I was harassed by locals. Because the church is so popular with tourists, some local vendors decided to take advantage of this, by doing business in the church parking lot. I wouldn't be complaining, except one of the vendors got on my nerves. All I wanted to do was enjoy the church in peace. We were taking some pictures and video, and it was pretty obvious that we were taking pictures of the church. But this one vendor just HAD to make sure we weren't taking pictures of him. But the worst part is, that he had his tent set up right in front of the church, as you can see in my second picture, so it was impossible to get a picture of the entire structure, without getting him and his tent. I don't have a problem with him doing business there, but he knows very well that people are gonna be taking pictures of the church, since it is one of the most photographed landmarks on the island. If he doesn't want to be in them, he should move his business to the other end of the parking lot. But that was really the only con, to what was otherwise a lovely place and visit.

    St. John's Parish Church St. John's Anglican Church St. John's Church Looks Like A Castle Grave Of Fernando Paleologus
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    Codrington College

    by briantravelman Written Mar 24, 2015

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    This school has such a long history, that it would literally take me all day to cover everything. So I am only going to cover what I think are the most important points. If you want to read more, you can do so by following the link at the bottom of the page.

    At first glance, you probably wouldn't guess that this was a school. To be fair, it's no ordinary school.
    Named after Christopher Codrington III, who served as Governor General of the Leeward Islands, Codrington College is the oldest Anglican Theological college in the Western Hemisphere. Construction of the school took place from 1715-1743, and it didn't officially open until 1745. A small chapel was dedicated in 1749.
    Christopher Codrington III died in 1710, on Good Friday. He believed strongly in both religion and education, so before he died, he left in his will two plantations, with the request that they be turned into educational institutions, one of which would become Codrington College. He wanted these institutions to teach not only religion, but also Philosophy, Mathematics, writing and even surgery and medicine, though the school never produced any doctors. He specifically wanted to provide education to slaves, which was strongly opposed and rejected by both the British Government, and the Barbados plantocracy. This is the reason the school took such a long time to complete. After several legal disputes and slave revolts, the school officially opened in 1745.
    These days, Codrington College continues to train priests from across the Caribbean, and ranks as one of the region's Top 10 Theological institutes. I actually managed to get a peek into one of the class rooms, and it was nothing fancy, like I imagined. In fact, it was rather small. Just a basic class room with chairs and desks.

    By far, the school's most notable feature is its large Lily Pool, which our driver explained, always maintains the same water level, as there is a complex underground pumping system, that produces a constant flow of both fresh water and sea water.

    The drive up to the building is an attraction in itself, as you travel up a beautiful palm tree lined road. Speaking of roads and driving, there is one bus that stops at Codrington College, but I didn't bother taking it, as it required getting to Bridgetown, and travelling across the entire island. I'm actually glad I didn't, as this place wouldn't have been worth a special trip. I actually ended up visiting with a private driver, as part of an all day taxi tour, as I did want to see it. This is by far the best option, if you're not renting a car. Either that, or book a tour that stops here, as it's really not worth making a special trip. Plus, our driver told us this place is a but difficult to find, on your own, especially since there is another school in the same area called, Codrington High School. So don't confuse the two.

    I came here because of the pictures I've seen on Google Earth, which made the place look large and peaceful. But the pictures make the grounds and school, look much larger than they actually are. In reality, there is only one building, and it's pretty small. The grounds aren't that large either.
    From reviews I've read from other people, it sounds like I might've enjoyed it more, if I came at a different time. We were there in the afternoon, so the sun was in the way, making it difficult to get a nice picture. Not to mention that we were there on a holiday, and there were a bunch of locals having picnics, so I was afraid they would start yelling at me or demanding money, just because they are in the background of my picture, as Bajans for some reason, do not like to be photographed, as I've already mentioned.
    To be honest, this place was a bit of a disappointment. The pictures made it look a lot nicer, than it actually is. Out of all the places I visited on this tour, this was my least favorite.
    This is one of those places I could've skipped, and lived with myself. It wasn't any more special than any other school. My university buildings are much nicer.
    This is something I would only visit, if you're exploring, some other stuff in the area. But even than, this is something you could skip, if you needed to save time. It's really nothing special. At the end, it's just a school. But despite this, it's still one of the most photographed buildings, on the island.

    Codrington College Lily Pool Codrington College Main Facade
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    Sunbury Plantation House

    by briantravelman Updated Feb 24, 2015

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    Though not as popular or impressive as the famous St. Nicholas Abbey, the Sunbury Plantation House is also worth visiting, if you want to get an idea of what Colonial era plantation looked like.
    Located in the rural countryside of St. Philip Parish, this charming Great House was built around 1660, by one of the island's first settlers, an English/Irish planter named Mathew Chapman. Throughout history, the Great House was occupied by several families.
    In 1995, a fire, most likely caused by arsonists, destroyed everything but the walls, which were built thick and strong enough to withstand hurricanes. Shortly after the incident, the house was rebuilt, and the furniture was replaced by furniture, from the same period, returning it to its original glory.
    Today, the house is a museum, open daily from 9-5. Tours take place about every hour, and offer visitors and elegant glimpse of 18th and 19th century life, on a Barbadian sugar cane plantation.

    Although it's not the original building, unlike St. Nicholas Abbey, it's still worth visiting, as it is the ONLY Great House on the island, that has all the rooms open for viewing. The rooms are mostly Victorian, and contain everything from beds, clothing, sewing and manicure kits, childs' dolls, old maps of the island, and even toilets.
    In addition to its restored rooms, there is also a mini-museum in the basement displaying old tools and firearms, English horse carriages, pottery, and kitchen implements from the Colonial period, amongst other things.
    The grounds are also worth exploring, as they have some old farming implements, and old stable, and some spectacular Bearded Fig Trees, which the island is named after.
    There is also a restaurant and gift shop, but I didn't use them, so I can't say what they are like.
    I'm not exactly sure where the name "Sunbury" came from, as none of the owners had that surname. It was most likely named after the London suburb, Sunbury-on-Thames, by why, I have no idea.
    Note, it would take me forever to write the entire history of the house, in my own words, so I only covered the key points. If you want to know more, click on the link where it says, "website".

    MY EXPERIENCE:

    Although the house itself was beautiful, and really interesting, and I really enjoyed the rooms and items on display, our guide was terrible. She saw me filming, and told me, I am free to video tape the whole house, but not her, which I thought was really strange, as a tour guide has never told me that before, but okay. This was a bit of an inconvenience though, because I would have to wait for her to move, so I could get a picture and video. Than quickly run after her to the next room. I actually lost her at one point. I wish she would've slowed down a bit, and allow some time for pictures and video, if she doesn't want to be in them. The only place she really did that is the first floor, before the tour started, and in the museum. Everywhere else, she would just quickly explain something very basic about the room, and move on. And when you are rushed, you end up with blurry pictures, and shaky footage that can't be used. Also, we were unfortunate enough to arrive at the house, the same time as a tour group, so the place was packed with tourists, which made it even more difficult to get some good pictures.
    But that stuff wasn't really such a big deal. It was the way our guide led the tour.
    She was friendly, but barely said anything the entire tour. Only talked about what the rooms were and the customs back than, but gave no information about the history of the house, or the people who lived in it, other than when it was built, which I already knew. Didn't even mention Mathew Chapman, the man who built the house, or the fire that destroyed it. Two very important pieces of information. Than in the museum section, she wasn't even with us, to explain the artifacts on display. She was rushing a bit, and never bothered to ask if we had any questions, which I did. The tour might as well have been self guided, since people were pretty much wondering wherever they wanted anyways.
    Seriously, I don't know why I had to pay money for a guide. I had more information on the house, than she did, which is not a good thing. Worst guide I've ever had!
    I felt really ripped off. If I'm paying so much money, I expect to learn some history about the house, and the artifacts on display, that I don't already know. For instance, why it's called Sunbury.
    We are fortunate to have sites like VT, where people can write their own travel guides, and actually provide some historical information, because you will not get much on the tour.
    Luckily, I did get a response from the manager on Trip Advisor, who said she will address this issue, and hopefully improve future guests' experiences, as a bad guide can really ruin your visit.

    GETTING THERE:

    Because of its rural location, getting to this historic home can be a bit difficult. A rental car is really your best option, but if you don't have one, the cheapest way to get to the plantation is to take the bus, though this option is a bit difficult, time consuming, and nerve wrecking, as it requires changing buses in Oistins. If you're traveling from the St. Lawrence Gap area, which you mostly will be, stand at any stop that says, "Out of City", and get in any blue bus, orange bus, or white van that says Oistins, Airport, or Silver Sands. Basically, any buses heading "Out of City" are traveling through Oistins, but ask the driver to make sure. The drivers or passengers will usually slow down and ask you where you're going.
    If by chance you're traveling from Bathsheba, it's "To City".
    Get off at the Oistins bus terminal, and catch bus 26, College Savannah, or just ColSavannah. This is the only bus that stops right in front of the plantation. There are other buses that go to this area, but they don't stop at the plantation, but sort of near it, so you'll have to do some walking. Note, this may require a 30 minute wait. The blue government bus wasn't going anywhere, so we just caught a private orange one that pulled up. Again, tell the driver where you want to go, to make sure you're on the right bus.
    The buses cost 2 BBD, and when you switch to another bus, you have to pay again. Note, they only accept local currency, won't give you change.
    The house is easy to miss, but there are signs for it on the way, so you might accidently get off too early as well, which we almost did. Just look out for the LARGE sign that says Sunbury Plantation House, and push the button to get the driver to stop. Or just ask the driver or a passenger to tell you where to get off.
    Although the bus works fine for getting here, getting back is another story. In fact, we were standing at the bus stop for about 10 minutes, before we were approached by a local guy. He told us the bus the system in this part of the island isn't very reliable, and we could be there for as long as an hour. He offered to drive us to the airport for 25 BBD, so we can catch a bus from there. After a few minutes of discussion, we agreed. Turns out he was a private driver, who was driving around some other tourists, so he wasn't able to take us all the way to Oistins. But he was able to chase down a bus for us, which got us back to Oistins,
    The only reason we took the bus here, is because I like to travel as cheap as possible, but it's really not the best option. If you're not looking for this kind of an adventure, it's probably better to just take a bus to Oistins, and grab a cab from there. Or even better, just visit the house as part of an all day island or taxi tour. It'll cost you a lot more, but it will be less stressful.

    Sunbury Plantation House Main Floor Victorian Era Bed Victorian Era Dolls English Carriages
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    Garrison Historic Area

    by jorgejuansanchez Written Aug 23, 2014

    Historic Bridgetown and its Garrison is a 17th century British colonial city that has been decxlared by UNESCO a Patrimony of the Humankind, although I ignored this when I visited Barbados. Just traveleld there in order to get to know all the important Caribbean islands.

    The garrison served as the headquarters of the British Navy in the region.

    Bridgetown was the place where black men from Africa (used as slaves) were kept to work in the sugar industry.

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    Calabaza catamaran

    by Dabs Written Jan 23, 2014

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    On our 3rd trip to Barbados by cruise ship, I wanted to go see the turtles again and Calabaza came highly recommended on Cruise Critic and Trip Advisor. I contacted them about a month before we arrived and arranged to go on a trip with them, it's a smaller boat and they take groups of 10-12 out. The rest of the passengers were other 3 other cruise passengers and 6 people staying on the island.

    They picked us up at the cruise terminal and drove us to the dock where we boarded the catamaran and sailed to our 1st stop to see the turtles. They do throw food into the water to attract the turtles, within minutes there were three turtles swimming around us. There were lots of other boats along with ours, it appears to be the 1st stop for all of them. The 2nd stop was just minutes away to see the three shipwrecks, we had someone with us that wasn't comfortable in the water so our guide spent most of his time tending to him than showing us stuff. The final stop was at a beach near the ________ resort, we got off the boat and swam to shore, had a little walk and then got back on board.

    They provided a nice buffet lunch, all kinds of drinks, snorkel equipment.

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    George Washington House Tour

    by 807Wheaton Written May 19, 2013

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    We took this tour with our Emerald Princess Cruise. The tour started at the George Washington House and that is where we met Peter and James. This is a UNESCO site and is in the process of being developed as a tour and restoration of several places we visited is ongoing. James gave us a brief introduction and then Peter came live on the screen from the tunnels under the island and the garrison. We had a time for Q & - very different and interesting. From there Peter took us through the house where George Washington stayed for about 6 weeks when he was 19 years old. He came with his brother Lawrence who was suffering from Tuberculosis and was looking for a cure.
    The house has a wonderful Caribbean interior and floor plan and is being beautifully restored. There is the usual kitchen that is separate from the house itself. The house was originally one story and now has a second floor that houses a neat little museum. The Stables Coffee Shop is across the street and is now open.

    George Washington House Barbados Dining Room Bedroom Kichen dependency
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    Tyrol Cot

    by TexasDave Updated Mar 5, 2013

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    The latest addition to the Barbados National Trust, this is the home of Barbados' first Premier, Sir Grantley Adams, and the birthplace of his son, Tom Adams, who became the Island's second prime minister. Built in 1854 out of coral stone, it gives an insight into island architecture and life back then. It also houses the family's memorabilia- gifts from visiting dignitaries, etc.
    Behind the house there is also the Heritage Village, a collection of authentic Chattel Houses which are now shops and workshops of artisans.
    Although Tyrol Cot is open during the week, there is more activity and more of the shops are open and functioning on the weekends. There is a parking lot across the street from the entrance.

    Entrance to Tyrol Cot Heritage Village
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    • Arts and Culture

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    Catamaran Cruise

    by Gillybob Updated Sep 14, 2012

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    There are many options for catamaran cruises across the island. I went out with Rubaiyat Cruises and had a great time. It is one of the smaller boats which I liked. These cruises have free-running alcohol, which can lead to some unfortunate times depending on the group you are travelling with. Most operators take you out to the marine park for snorkelling, followed by some cruising around the south west and west coasts of the island.

    Prices vary according to package.

    UPDATE : SEPTEMBER 2012

    I have just attempted to access the website listed below and notice it no longer resolves to an active website - it may be that this company no longer operates. Feel free to let me know if you have any further information with which I can update this tip further.

    Wrapping the sail On board the catamaran
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    Party Time

    by Gillybob Updated Sep 14, 2012

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Many tourists visiting Barbados will be staying in St Lawrence Gap. Here you will find a large collection of the island's hotels, restaurants, bars and nightclubs - everything to suit all tastes.

    For more information on St Lawrence Gap, check out my dedicated page on the area.

    Entrance to'The Gap' Beach at The Gap
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    Dover

    by Gillybob Updated Sep 14, 2012

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Dover rests at the end of Barbados' party zone of St Lawrence Gap. The beach is one of the most popular on the island and is surrounded by hotels - be sure to watch out for the public access signs which indicate the route to the beach. Dover playing field is home of the Congaline Festival.

    Check out my Dover page for more information.

    Dover beach at sunset Fisherman
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    Bathsheba

    by Gillybob Updated Sep 14, 2012

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bathsheba is on the east coast of Barbados. This coast has a wild aspect to it and feels totally different to the coast around the rest of the island. It makes a great place to spend a day during your visit to the island.

    Check out my Bathsheba page for more information, including how to get there using public transport.

    Bathsheba shows her wild side Bathsheba beach Bathsheba beach hut
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    • Budget Travel
    • Beaches

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  • Island Safari Jeep Tour

    by dondicobb Written Jul 1, 2012

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    This is probably the best thing we have done on the island. Our guide was very entertaining and informed about the history and current events on Barbados. I was concerned about the heat but there was constantly a cool breeze blowing. We met some really terrific people on the tour and got to see some very special places that otherwise we would have never found. Great value, great fun. Don't miss this excursion!

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Safari

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Barbados Hotels

See all 105 Hotels in Barbados
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    Enterprise Coast Rd, , Barbados, Caribbean

    Satisfaction: Excellent

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