Museo de la Revolution - Revolution Museum, Havana

3.5 out of 5 stars 21 Reviews

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  • hojasdehierba's Profile Photo

    Formerly, Batista's Palace

    by hojasdehierba Updated Feb 23, 2006

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    This beautiful building was formerly the Presidential Palace of Dictator Fulgencio Batista. It was decided that it became Revolution Museum with a clearly symbolic goal: Revolution defeats Batista even at his own Palace. It was built at 1920 under the plans of Paul Belau (the same architect of the Grand Theatre) and Carlos Maruri. A good amount of decoration job was due to Tiffany, New York. It presently shows documents, photos and objects about Cuban struggle against colonialist dependence and with special attention to Revolution. It opens every day from 10 to 17.
    Este hermoso edificio fue el Palacio Presidencial del Dictador Fulgencio Bastista. Se decidio que pasara a ser el Museo de la Revolucion con un objetivo claramente simbolico: la Revolucion vence a Batista incluso en su propio Palacio. Fue construido en 1920 bajo la direccion de Paul Belau (el mismo arquitecto que el Gran Teatro) y Carlos Maruri. Una buena parte del trabajo de decoracion estuvo a cargo de Tiffany, New York. En la actualidad muestra documentos, fotos y objetos de la lucha cubana por la independencia colonial, con especial atencion a la Revolucion. Abre todos los dias de 10 a 17.

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  • Oana_bic's Profile Photo

    Museo de la Revolucion y Memorial Granma

    by Oana_bic Written Jan 25, 2006

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    The 1950s dictator Batista ? like all dictators ? had to try and impress cubans with a grand presidential palace. So it is ironic that this glorious palace, which he hardly had time to enjoy, now houses the Museum of the Revolution, a vivid exhibition displaying the struggle of the Cuban people to gain sovereignty over their own island. Exhibits include photographs, cinefilm, clothing, original documents and weapons. In the garden is the Granma Memorial ? the boat Granma in which Fidel Castro and over 80 foolhardy combatants returned to Cuba from exile in Mexico in 1956. Also scattered around the garden are various vehicles used in the struggle.

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    Granma!

    by xaver Written May 25, 2008

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    museum
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    Batista (like all dictators) had to try and impress the people with a grand presidential palace. It is ironic that this glorious palace, which he hardly had time to enjoy, now hosts the museum of the revolution, an exhibition of the struggle of the Cuban people to gain sovereignty over their own island. Exhibits include photographs, cinefilm, clothing, original documents and weapons. In the garden is the Granma Memorial. The boat Granma in which Fidel Castro and over 80 foolhardy combatants returned to Cuba from exile in Mexico in 1956. In the garden there are also some vehicles of that struggle.

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    Museo de la revolution

    by maryamy Written Jun 2, 2003

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    Guns in Havana

    The revolution's museum showcases what is important to those loyal to it today. It depicts the tough and often bloody history of Cuba with some vivid explanations.
    What saddened me most was that the picture you see is the symbol of all revolutions...

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    Inside Museo de la Revolucion

    by mim95 Written Aug 8, 2004

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    The extravagant  Salon de los Espejos

    The former Presidential Palace was lavishly decorated by Tiffany's. The dome in the center opens to the ground floor. Its interior is made of colourful ceramic tiles and is decorated with paintings. The grand marble staircase leads to the upper floors.

    The Salon de los Espejos (Room of Mirrors) on the second floor is the former reception hall of the Palace. It is a replica of the room with the same name in Versailles. Huge mirrors are placed around the room and the high ceiling is covered with a beautiful painting. There is a lot of detailed works around the doors and arches.

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    Revolutionary Museum (Museo de la Revolucion)

    by Soozay Written Mar 22, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Bullet holed truck

    Built in 1920 to house former Cuban presidents it is fitting that the revolutionary museum be housed here. The last president left in 1959 as a result of the revolution.
    Walk from room to room to learn about the history of the revolution and how it became a socialist republic. Warning: Some of the photographs and artifacts may not be suitable for viewing by young children.
    See if you can find the bullet holes in the marble when you go up the steps to the first level of the museum.
    Walk to the back of the museum and you can see aircraft and other vehicles on display. I took this photo of a delivery truck that was bullethole sprayed in a raid during the revolution.

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    Museo de la Revolucion

    by mim95 Updated May 31, 2007

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    Outside the entrance to Museo de la Revolucion

    Built in the 1910s, the museum was the residential Palace for 40 years before the revolution. There is a watch tower in front of the museum entrance, which was part of the old city wall. On the opposite side, it sits a Soviet tank that was supposedly commanded by Castro at the battle of the Bay of Pigs.

    The museum has a lot of exhibits, photos, artworks on Cuban hisotry, focusing on independence and revolution. Prepare to spend a couple of hours in here as it covers all the major political events since Spanish times.

    There is an admission, and guided tours are available.

    It is quite hot inside, with the occasional large fans.

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    Memorial Granma

    by mim95 Written Aug 8, 2004

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    Memorial Granma

    The glass-enclosed boat named Granma carried Castro, Che and 80 other revolutionists from Mexico to Cuba in 1956. Around it are planes, cars and army vehicles used during the revolutions, including the remnants of a downed US military plane.

    Must enter through the Museo de la Revolucion. (admission included)

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    Revolution Museum

    by Joseph69 Updated Jan 12, 2007

    3 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Some war artifacts in the outdoor area
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    The Revolution Museum (built in 1920 by the architects Paul Belaue and Carlos Maruri) is a beautiful building which used to house the previous Dictator Fulgencio Batista, thus was the Presidential Palace. So, it's now a museum, probably for political reasons to symbolise that the revolution defeated Batista at his own palace!

    It has many historical artifacts and is an interesting museum to visit. It's open from 10am to 5pm every day.

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  • Camping_Girl's Profile Photo

    I've never seen so much marble in my life...

    by Camping_Girl Updated Feb 3, 2011

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Museo de la Revolucion
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    The Museum of the Revolution was originally the Presidential Palace. All I can say is "Wow!" It is an absolutely opulent building, it's hard to take it all in. We spent about an hour touring the museum. We quickly tired of the Communist propaganda but couldn't stop gaping at the building itself! (Allegedly Tiffany's of New York originally did the decorating in the building.)

    The museum is near the site where Fidel and Che originally landed in 1956 when they successfully overthrew the government.

    It is open daily from 10 am to 5 pm. Admission is 6CUC.

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  • tim07's Profile Photo

    Museum

    by tim07 Written May 4, 2008

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    The museum is located in the Palacio Presidencial, which was the official residence of Cuban presidents between 1920 & 1965. The building was turned into a museum dedicated to the Cuban Revolution in 1974.

    Highlights include the Hall of Mirrors & Golden Hall, there are exhibitions to Cuban history from the 15th century to the present day. The bulk of the exhibitions concentrate on the Cuban Revolution & behind the museum surrounded by glass is the Granma yacht along with planes, vehicles & weapons used in the revolution.

    The museum was open 10am-5pm & the ticket price was 5 CUC.

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  • Santini738's Profile Photo

    Museo de la Revolución

    by Santini738 Written Mar 17, 2008

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    Museo de la Revoluci��n
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    The Museum of the Revolution (Spanish: Museo de la Revolución) is a museum located in the Old Havana section of Havana, Cuba. The museum is housed in what was the Presidential Palace of all Cuban presidents from Mario García Menocal to Fulgencio Batista. It became the Museum of the Revolution during the years following the Cuban revolution.

    The museum's exhibits Cuban history are largely devoted to the period of the revolutionary war of the 1950s and to the country's post-1959 history. Portions of the museum are also devoted to pre-revolutionary Cuba, including its War of Independence waged against Spain.

    Behind the building lies the Granma Memorial, a large glass enclosure which houses the Granma, the yacht which took Fidel Castro and his revolutionaries from Mexico to Cuba for the revolution. Around the Granma an SA-2 Guideline surface-to-air missile of the type that shot down a U.S. Lockheed U-2 spyplane during the Cuban Missile Crisis, and the engine of the U-2 airplane is displayed. There are also various vehicles and tanks used in the revolution displayed. Near museum located SU-100, a Soviet tank destroyer.

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  • leffe3's Profile Photo

    Museo de la Revolucion

    by leffe3 Updated Aug 1, 2006

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    Another 1920s building (as is the Capitol), formerly the Presidential Palace is now the home of the Museo de la Revolucion.

    The history of Cuban political development is housed here (all explanations in Spanish only) and its a fascinating if rag-bag collection. Cuban heroes in all walks of life are celebrated - and needless to say Guevara features a great deal. Mixed in with the great photos and stuffed animals are bizarre personal momentoes, including plastic shower curtains and knives and forks, used by heroes in various campaigns. In the rear courtyard is the yacht Granma, on which Castro landed in 1956 to launch the revolution.

    Open Tuesday - Sunday. 10am-5pm

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  • Museum of the Revolution

    by elgarbo Written Oct 15, 2005

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    Ahhh... the museum of the revolution. Housed in Batista's old palace, the museum currently holds all sorts of bits and pieces related to the Cuban Revolution. Some of the exhibits don't make a great deal of sense, and others are missing English captions altogether, so it makes for a somewhat stilted experience.

    That said, it's something you can't miss, just for the social significance of the museum. Outside, inside a big glass chamber, you can see the Granma yacht, that which Castro and friends sailed to Cuba upon to launch the revolution. There are also some other highlights, including the wax replica of Che Guevara, the Soviet missile systems and the grand old architecture of the palace itself.

    Well worth a look.

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  • RickL's Profile Photo

    Museo de la Revolution (one of...

    by RickL Written Aug 26, 2002

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    Museo de la Revolution (one of many), Havana. This one is in the former presidential palace with awesome architecture and Tiffany decorations. Worth the admission fee just to see the opulence of its former life. I certainly left with a greater understanding of the harsh conditions under Batista.
    They will charge you more if you want to take your camera in with you. I didn't, but in retrospect, I wish I had!:(
    It also has many of the tanks, planes and the Granma parked out back for you to look at as well.

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