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Most Viewed Favorites in Dominican Republic

  • ValbyDK's Profile Photo

    Coconut Drink

    by ValbyDK Updated Mar 3, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: A coconut drink is sold in many places in the Dominican Republic - for example at local markets where the sales man will open it in front of you and serve it with a straw.

    Refreshing, but okay - its not one of my favourites… If you try be sure that the coconut is fresh (young and green) and check the coconut for insects holes...

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    Seashells and Corals

    by ValbyDK Updated Mar 3, 2013

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: It is very easy to find seashells and corals in the Dominican Republic. If you take a walk along the beaches you’ll see many different kinds - and they are very beautiful, but dead shells and corals are often home and food for other species and is a part of the natural environment, so don’t bring them home!

    It is also against the law in many countries to bring shells and corals into the country!

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  • ValbyDK's Profile Photo

    Dominican Cuisine

    by ValbyDK Updated Mar 3, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: If you are interested in Dominican Republic cuisine – or maybe want to try some cooking at home – I can recommend the book: “Aunt Clara's Dominican Cookbook”.

    Have you for example ever tried “Mondongo”?

    Read more at: www.dominicancooking.com

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture
    • Food and Dining

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  • ValbyDK's Profile Photo

    Climate

    by ValbyDK Updated Mar 3, 2013

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The climate at the Dominican Republic is tropical maritime with little seasonal temperature variation. The wet season is from May to November with most rain in the northern and eastern regions. The main annual temperature ranges from 21c in the mountainous regions to 25c on the plains and the coast. The average temperature in Santo Domingo in January is 25c and 30c in July.

    The island lies in the middle of the hurricane belt and is subject to severe storms from June to October/November!

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

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  • englishman007's Profile Photo

    shiping

    by englishman007 Written Nov 14, 2009

    Favorite thing: I agree - it is wonderful over there - seafood is awesome and all that fruit- and I do have a passion for roadside chiccarones although I have to dio that sparingly - but they are soooooooooooooooo good. I wanted however to bring over food for the poor there- from what I see in their supermarkets, everything is so expensive for them.. here we have great supermarkets, with awesome discounts and deals all the time- they are so por there and no one gives them a break on prices like we get here...

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  • melosh's Profile Photo

    Every year, just a little bit better.

    by melosh Written May 29, 2009

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Except in Santo Domingo, I would take someone to one of the many seaside "malecons" (ocean front roads) on a Friday Saturday or Sunday afternoon and buy a couple large Presidente beers and watch the Dominican world pass by.

    Over the last four years, it has seemed to me that the economy and condition of the country has been steadily improving. What has not changed is the liveliness and friendliness of the people that is especially notable away form the beach resorts.

    Fondest memory: I love the Bachata musical style and how almost everywhere you go in the Dominican Republic you can hear the Dominicans enjoying their music.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel

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  • marielexoteria's Profile Photo

    Distance table between some of our cities

    by marielexoteria Updated Apr 13, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The DR is not so big but the farthest road trip, be it by bus or by car, can take 5-6 hours. Depending on when you start it can take up to 8! (like from Punta Cana to Enriquillo lake), so to help you plan your road trip, this table can tell you how many kilometers there are between your point of origin and your destination. Be aware that Dominicans drive like crazy (hehe) and that taking buses is a lot cheaper than renting a car, buying insurance and gasoline. Either way you want to travel, remember to bring water and notice that on Caribe Tours buses food isn't allowed to be brought.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel
    • Road Trip

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  • Melia tropica Resort

    by hux6102 Written Mar 27, 2008

    Favorite thing: We felt that our resort was fantastic. We are 78+ and had no trouble at all getting around. I really can not understand the reviews that said you would have to wait long periods for transportation. Never more than 5 minutes. If there were not so many places to0 travel, we would go back there all the time.

    Fondest memory: Besides the obvious beauty of the resort and the charm of the staff, it would be the stark contrast of the living conditions of the citizens in the country side. Of course we have that here in the States.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel
    • Spa and Resort
    • Seniors

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  • marielexoteria's Profile Photo

    Best time to visit

    by marielexoteria Updated Mar 5, 2008

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: You could visit DR all year round, but I'd suggest to avoid visiting in May because it rains a lot.

    Our high season goes between mid December to March (more or less) and Easter week if it's in April. Other times where the prices sky rocket are long weekends due to moving any public holiday.

    Fondest memory: The traditional dish called "La Bandera" (the flag). Read about it on my Local Customs page.

    Related to:
    • Budget Travel

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    Far away from tourist areas...

    by venenorojo Written Nov 2, 2007

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: My trip to the Dominican Republic was a bit different to a normal tourist trip... I stayed in a friend's appartment in the near of Higuey. It was a small village without streets and shops, just small tienditas.
    To do a trip as this I really give you the good advice to speak a bit of Spanish. Otherwise it's a bit difficult.
    Don't drink the water, and try the fresh seafood you can eat in small restaurants in Boca Yuma. There as well you have great posibilities to dance salsa, merengue and bachata in a lovely pavillon next to the sea... Every sunday afternoon...
    There's not many culture, but if you visit the Dominican Republic with an open heart, you will make a lots of new friends.

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Road Trip

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  • marielexoteria's Profile Photo

    Language: handy spanish phrases

    by marielexoteria Updated Oct 23, 2007

    4 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The official language of the DR is Spanish although English, German, French and Italian are widely spoken in touristic areas. However, if you want to go beyond the AI's (all-inclusive hotels) then these phrases might come in handy.

    Hola: hello
    Buenos días: good morning
    Buenas tardes: good afternoon
    Buenas noches: good evening/night
    Me llamo : my name is
    Por favor: please
    Gracias: thank you
    De nada: you're welcome
    ¿Habla inglés?: do you speak English?
    Excúseme/Perdóneme: pardon me
    Permiso: excuse me
    No hablo español: I don't speak Spanish
    No comprendo: I don't understand
    Hable despacio, por favor: speak slowly, please
    Un momento, por favor: one moment, please
    ¿Cuánto cuesta ...?: how much is it?

    When reading (menus, signs, etc.)
    Agua: water
    Bebidas: drinks
    Jugo de naranja/manzana/toronja: orange/apple/grapefruit juice
    Menú: menu
    Desayuno: breakfast
    Almuerzo: lunch
    Cena: dinner
    Cerveza: beer
    Vino: wine
    Ron: rum
    Pollo: chicken
    Vegetales: vegetables
    Azúcar: sugar
    Sal/Pimienta: salt/pepper
    Entrada: entrance fee, entrance
    Salida: exit
    Colmado: (small) convenience store
    Salón: beauty parlor

    More to come.

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    Sosua is a surprise.

    by melosh Updated May 27, 2007

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: Sosua today is a surprise compared to what you read in the guide books. The cheap hotels listed in the Lonely Planet have been gone for a number of years. The heavy sex trade is history and the day when there were no upper class clubs and bars has also passed. In fact, this is the only place I found in the DR outside the big resorts that seems to have polished itself into a small tourist town of the style Americans are used to. The streets in the center of this small town are clean and modern. The beaches are nice, and it is reported that the water is calm most days and snorkeling and scuba diving are good.

    If I was going to take a group of friends to the Dominican Republic, this would be a good compromise choice falling between the real Puerta Plata and a large resort.

    Related to:
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons
    • Budget Travel
    • Road Trip

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  • TheTravelSlut's Profile Photo
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    Spending money maybe more difficult than you think

    by TheTravelSlut Written Oct 19, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: I would recommend that your primary reason to go to Punta Cana would be for poolside or beach activities. There are plenty of water-related activities and I would recommend that you take advantage of them as nightlife is limited.

    Most of the all-inclusives are self-contained--meaning that you may never have a reason to leave the property and if you don't leave the property, then the only way you can spend money is in the casino or gift shops.

    Fondest memory: The water and beaches. They are some of the finest I have ever experienced.

    Related to:
    • Beaches
    • Spa and Resort
    • Family Travel

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    New Plates

    by grandmaR Updated Oct 14, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The license plates for the Dominican Republic are fairly basic with the name of the country (Republica Dominica) and the numbers and letters. The plates are the North American shape, rather than the longer thinner European shape and are displayed only on the rear of the vehicle, not on the front.

    When I asked about this plate, which appeared different than the others I had seen, I was told it was a new plate. The old plates were apparently a solid color (photo 2)

    Fondest memory: I got quite a few pictures while we were driving in Santo Domingo which show (among other things) the license plates on the cars ahead of us in the traffic (photos 3 and 5).

    Related to:
    • National/State Park
    • Budget Travel
    • Historical Travel

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  • Arial_27's Profile Photo

    Pesos

    by Arial_27 Written May 12, 2006

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Favorite thing: The currency used here is Dominican Pesos. Some may accept American dollars in Santo Domingo, but very rarely outside of the city. 100 pesos is equal to about $3 Canadian dollars, so its quite a difference! Try to change just as much as what you're going to spend, because its apparently not as easy to change money back from Dominican pesos since they aren't as desirable. It may be possible at the airport, but you might have a hard time at currency exchange offices. Also keep in mind that things here are a lot cheaper than you'd expect. You can buy a pizza slice for $1, and a full meal for only $3-4. This also of course depends on where you're buying it from and the portion of the food. Things may be more expensive in the really high class resorts.

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