Colonial Architecture, Antigua Guatemala

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  • Arco de Santa Catalina at night
    Arco de Santa Catalina at night
    by toonsarah
  • Arco de Santa Catalina
    Arco de Santa Catalina
    by toonsarah
  • Colonial Architecture
    by Mailo
  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Museo de Arte Colonial

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Feb 1, 2014

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    Museo de Arte Colonial
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    This building was originally the University of San Carlos Booremeo founded in 1676. Today it houses the colonial art musuem. Photgraphy is forbidden insde the building but I got these shots of the courtyard of the building which is the real attraction here not the art within.

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    Arco de San Catalina

    by Jim_Eliason Updated Feb 1, 2014

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    Arco de San Catalina
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    This landmark of Antigua is a few blocks north of Parque Central on 5 Avenida Norte. The Arch was built in 1693 to allow the Nuns from the Convent of La Merced on one side of the street to travel back and forth with the San Catalina school on the other without being seen. Today neither the Convent nor the school remain but the Arch has become Antigua's most famous landmark.

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    Arco de Santa Catalina

    by toonsarah Written Dec 11, 2010

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    Arco de Santa Catalina
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    This is perhaps the defining symbol of Antigua. It is a remnant of the once-enormous Convent of St. Catherine. This convent was founded in 1613 with only four nuns, but by 1693 its numbers had swelled and its buildings lay on both sides of 5a Avenida Norte forced it to expand across the street. The arch was built to allow the sisters to pass from one side to the other without leaving their seclusion or being seen by people outside. The arch we see today however is a 19th century reconstruction as the original, like so much of Antigua, was destroyed by the 1773 earthquake. The clock on top is French and apparently has to be wound every three days, although we didn’t see anyone doing so on the several times we passed beneath the arch.

    The classic view is not this one, but taken from the other side, when if you manoeuvre yourself carefully you can frame Volcan Agua in the arch. Unfortunately that side is north-facing, so is rarely as nicely lit as this early morning shot taken from the corner by our hotel, with instead of the volcano the church of La Merced glimpsed beyond.

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    Walk an see the place.

    by Mailo Written Jul 14, 2008
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    Just walking around you can enjoy this place, visit as much museums and historic buildings as you can, be sure to read about their history and inportance to Guatemala itself as part of the central american history.

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    Compañia de Jesus Church.

    by euzkadi Written Jun 15, 2008

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    This church was the first construction of this Jesuit Complex, and was started in 1676. Actually the ruins of the church are closed waiting for a future restoration. This picture shows the church with a kind of monument dedicated to the interesting "Los Desaparecidos" exhibition about the missing persons in Latin America under the military´s regimes.

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    Compañia de Jesus Convent (Cooperacion Española)

    by euzkadi Updated Jun 15, 2008

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    This Huge colonial convent (takes up almost a whole city block) were built by the Jesuits (Soldiers of Christ) in 1626; this was their church, convent and school (Colegio de San Francisco de Borja) until 1767 when they were throw out from all Latin America by King Carlos III of Spain by order of the Vatican. Heavily damaged by several earthquakes, it was restored by the Spanish Cooperation office and was reopened in 1997 by Sofia Queen of Spain. Actually is a cultural center, with arts exhibitions and has a great library

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    Arco de Santa Catalina

    by Hopkid Updated Nov 25, 2007

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    Arguably the symbol of Antigua the world over, the Arco de Santa Catalina spans the width of 5a Avenida Norte just south of the Iglesia de Nuestra Senora de la Merced. The Convento de Santa Catalina was built on the west side of 5a Avenida Norte in 1613. There came a time when the order expanded across the street to the east. However the nuns practiced a vow of reclusion and did not allow contact or to even be seen by the local populace. In order to allow the nuns to cross from one side of 5a Avenida Norte without being seen, the Arco de Santa Catalina was built in 1694. As with many structures in Antigua, it was badly damaged during the 1773 earthquake but was restored in the 19th century which included the addition of the clock tower. The clock was damaged in a subsequent earthquake but was restored in 1991.

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    Palacio del Ayuntamiento

    by Hopkid Written Nov 25, 2007

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    Built in 1743, the Antigua City Hall sits across the street from the northeast corner of the Parque Central. The structure was built with seismic forces in mind as it has survived the many earthquakes since its inception much better than a lot of the churches in town. The city government runs things from the offices within but visitors are welcome to explore for a small fee. Two museums, the Museo de Santiago and the Museo del Libro Antiguo are also housed in the building.

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    Arco de Santa Catalina

    by Pieter11 Written Nov 21, 2007

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    Arco de Santa Catalina
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    Probably the most famous structure in the city: the Arco de Santa Catalina. It is situated in the mainstreet from the Parque Central towards the church Nuestra Señora de la Merced.

    This Arch is one of the only buildings in the city that survived the big earthquake of 1773. It was built in 1694 as a part of the neighbouring cloister. This was the best way to make it possible for the nuns to cross the street without being seen.

    The arch has the same bright yellow colour as many other buildings in the city. It has a white clock on the tower in the middle of it and great view to all ways: towards the north you have a look of the Nuestra Señora, and to the south you see the Volcano Agua above the Parque Central.

    Luckily the street of the Arco is closed for traffic most of the times, so the pictures you take have no disturbing cars on it.

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    Palacio de los Capitanes

    by Pieter11 Written Nov 12, 2007

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    El Palacio de los Capitanes
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    The classy, white building at the southside of the Parque Central is the most important political remaining of the days that Antigua still was the capital of Spanish Central America. Until 1773 this building was the base for the government that ruled everything from the south of Mexico until Costa Rica. After this year, the seat of the government was transferred to Guatemala-City. Today the building is used for several purposes. It is the office of National Police, the seat of the Governor of the Province Sacatepéquez and you can find the tourist office here.

    The Palacio de los Capitanes has an impressive facade with two stores of white arches along the complete width of the square. The columns on the ground and the first floor are heavy and solid and the big wooden doors behind the arches are just as massive-looking. Like a lot of buildings in Antigua this palace could use some restaurationwork, but on the other hand this is part of the charme of the building.

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  • One of the most beautiful Colonial towns in Americ

    by GraceH Written Sep 6, 2007

    I was here for one day in July 2007. Our hosts (the Guatemalan Olympic Comittee) threw a party at the Convent and while the celebration was going on, I did a little exploring around the town. This is TRULY one of the MOST BEAUTIFUL towns in this continent. It is largely untouched by modern architecture and has plenty of small cafes, taverns, restaurants and shops - you've GOT to buy some of the gorgeous embroidered / woven textiles. Look for a shop that is owned by a Frenchman (sorry, I can't remember the name of the place!), it has some of the most beautiful, high quality textiles in the most gorgeous colors and patterns. I bought a scarf that is to die for!

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    Colonial Architecture

    by easterntrekker Updated Mar 22, 2007

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    We really enjoyed strolling through beautiful Antigua and marvelling at the wonderful colourful stone buildings and fine examples of colonial architecture. The dramatic backdrop for these magnificant stone building was...narrow cobblestone streets and a scattering of ruins with colourful flowers tumbling over broken walls.

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    Casa Popenoe

    by calcaf38 Updated Dec 30, 2006

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    This first rate visit is a well kept secret. The Casa Popenoe allows you to discover, perfectly preserved, what an Antigua house was like during the town's prime. Notice, on one of the photos, the antique marimba (the national instrument of Guatemala).

    Open in the afternoon. Entrance is only $2.

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    Arco de Santa Catalina

    by calcaf38 Updated Dec 29, 2006

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    Probably one of the most photogenic monuments in the world, this squat arch straddles the 5th Avenue. It is nothing much, but it is a delight to see again and again, under all kinds of light. When the sky is clear, you can position yourself so that the Arco frames the closest volcano.

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    Colonial Architecture

    by VinTolucci Written Aug 7, 2004

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    5th Ave Arch

    Antigua is magical. One can come here and enjoy the magnificent architecture or go for a ride on a horse carriage along the cobble stoned streets. The Parque Central is the towns main square although not the only park.

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