Isla de Roatán Off The Beaten Path

  • Off The Beaten Path
    by joiwatani
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by joiwatani
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by joiwatani

Most Recent Off The Beaten Path in Isla de Roatán

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    The bank in Isla Roatan

    by joiwatani Written Oct 3, 2011

    The money used in Isla Roatan is called Limpira. But, most of the vendors and shops like the dollar also.

    You can have your dollar exchanged at the Banco Atlantida located at the central market in Coxen Hole.

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    Street vendors in Isla Roata

    by joiwatani Written Oct 3, 2011
    Vendor selling barbecued corn
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    There are many street vendors in Isla Roatan selling from hot food tamales to vendors barbecuing corn or vendors selling oranges and pomelos (grapefruits).

    I saw them at the central market, along the highway and street corners.

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    The Municipal Market of Isla Roatan

    by joiwatani Updated Oct 3, 2011

    Are you looking for a bargain? You should check the market of Isla Roatan. There are many things to buy there. This is where the local people shop from their pots and pans, clothes, baskets, home necessities, beans, rice, fish meat, vegetables, groceries, etc.

    Haggling is allowed. Don't just pay the price they tell you.

    To those people who are not used to shopping in poor countries, this is not a place for you because you can see open canals on the side of the street and you know what that means. Or maybe, it's time for you to experience how poor people shop and when you go home, be more appreciative of what you have.

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    The "Tamale" lady

    by joiwatani Updated Oct 2, 2011
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    While walking on the street near the market in Coxen Hole, Isla Roatan, this lady approached us. She asked us to buy her "tamale", a native food with a steamed mashed corn, chicken meat or pork and chilli paste wrapped in a banana leaf.

    "How much?" I asked the lady as she showed me a bucketful of tamales. She lifted a piece and she told me it was $5.00 a piece. The tamales were small. I told her that in my hometown, I buy them for $5.00 for six pieces and they were wrapped individually with a corn husk. Then a Honduran customer bought and paid in Limpiras which is lower than the US dollar. I spoke with her in Spanish and she was surprised that I understood her language and told her in Spanish that she should not be selling her tamales with a higher price because it was not good for her business.

    The lady was embarrassed and the people who heard me talking in Spanish to her started laughing. They said she was just kidding.

    I didn't buy from her because I was scared eating out if I didn't see how she prepared the food. I only buy from food vendors when I actually see how they cook like if the food I buy is being boiled right in front of me or dipped in boiling water or fried in boiling oil.

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    The mechical way of peeling a pomelo

    by joiwatani Written Oct 2, 2011
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    There is this vendor selling pomelos and oranges on the street. At first, I didn't recognize what he was selling at a distance until I finally went and ask him what he was selling. To my amazement, he was peeling a pomelo by a homemade peeler. It was quite nice.

    The vendor allowed my daughter try peeling the pomelo with his peeling machine!

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    The view deck at Coxen Hole

    by joiwatani Written Oct 2, 2011
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    At the top of a hill in Coxen Hole, there is a two story commercial building which houses a store that sells gifts from Honduras like the Mahogany crafts. To the left of the parking lot, there was this structure that was made of wood and with roof with an open space. We were not sure what it was. There were no chairs on it. It was just an open space. I figured out it was a view deck. My daughter and I went there and was just impressed how solid the wood that was used to build it. I could not figure it out why it was there. If it was a view deck or a lookout because it was on top of a hill, then where is the view? I cannot see the ocean where I was except the forest in front of me. I was clueless why there was a view deck at Coxen Hole when there was no view except for the trees!

    My daughter started taking pictures of us jumping so we can tag the pictures for VT jumpingnorman. We were just having a great time jumping...

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    The flora and fauna in Mahogany Bay

    by joiwatani Written Oct 2, 2011
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    First of all, I saw endless of healthy and tall mangroves along the bay. The canopy of the forest is very thick with mahogany and other tropical trees.

    I saw papayas laden with fruits. At the Coxen Hole market, I saw local vendors on the streets selling oranges and pomelo.

    The flora and fauna here is beautiful and I am hoping that when I come back again, it is still the same and not replaced by new building for the sake of development.

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    The cruise ships dock here

    by joiwatani Written Oct 2, 2011
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    I saw two cruiseships that were docked here. One is closer to the West Bay area. I heard from the local people that the port was developed by the Carnival Cruise lines and they invested $62 million dollars in the building of the Mahogany Bay Shopping Comples and the port.

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    Taking the lift to Mahogany Bay Beach

    by joiwatani Written Oct 1, 2011

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    The lift going to Mahogany Beach
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    There is a lift that goes from the Mahogany Bay Mall to the Mahogany Bay beach. It cost $16.00 per person. My daughter Rainier and I took a lift because I wanted to see the aerial view of the Mahogany Bay. To me, the money I paid was worth it since I know that I may not come back in the next couple of years here. The view up on the lift was very beautiful. My daughter and I enjoyed our short ride.

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  • Escape the Crowds!

    by JimmyRoatan Updated Apr 4, 2011

    West End is where the majority of the cruise shippers are taken to. it can get crowded if there is more than one cruise ship on the island. if they want off the beaten path, they can hire a driver, there will be many waiting for a day trip. the east end of the island is beautiful, with deserted beaches, great snorkeling, trips to the mangrove forest for wildlife watching and no other tourist around.

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    Punta Gorda, Home of the Garifuna

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Punta Gorda, on the North Coast of Roatan
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    On the northeastern coast of Roatan, well off the beaten tourist path, we came upon the very small village of Punta Gorda. This is the only only true Garifuna community on Roatan, and it was the first Garifuna settlement in Central America.

    Garífuna refers to both the people and language of the Garínagu. They are ethnically descended from Amerindian and African people and their language is a dialect of a native Brazilian language from the Arawkan family. A total of about 500,000 Garifuna people live along the Caribbean Coast in Belize, Guatemala (Livingston), Nicaragua and Honduras on the mainland, and here on the island of Roatán. The Black Caribs or Garifunas where marooned in Roatan by the British in 1796 and first settled in Punta Gorda.

    We enjoyed a very interesting and tasty lunch at the only restaurant here in Punta Gorda. See our restaurant tip.

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    Oak Ridge, aka "Little Venice"

    by Stephen-KarenConn Updated May 26, 2007

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    Little Venice on Isla de Roatan
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    One of the more interesting parts of Roatan we visited was "Little Venice," so named because the major means of transportation between the homes and businesses here is by water. Brightly colored houses stand on stilts out over the water and many of them apparently can only be reached by boat.

    When we took our boat tour through the mangrove tunnels we began here in Little Venice. Before we ventured into the mangroves, our guide stopped at a rustic service station jutting out over the water and asked for one gallon of gasoline. There was no pump or tank. The gasoline was stored in cans and jugs, the largest of which held only a few gallon.

    Little Venice was nothing at all like its namesake in Italy. However, we did find it a very picturesque and colorful community which was very interesting to see.

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    It wasn't all glam

    by HispanicYob Written May 24, 2006

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    Despite it being a natural beauty and wonder, Roatán still has it's share of troubles. Some houses were simple shacks, tucked away inside the natural setting. Not to say it's a bad thing, you'd have to be very close-minded to not appreciate the beauty of this place just because of something like this.

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    A shipwreck

    by HispanicYob Written May 24, 2006

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    I wonder what became of this thing

    Once again, as with the mayor's house, not technically a part of the beaten path since almost everything in Roatán's by the roadside, but everything is Roatán is out of the way anyway that I consider it all off the beaten paths.

    This picture is some sort of shipwreck. It appears this place has a couple. Not sure if anyone goes out there but it's very interesting to see.

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    The mayor's house

    by HispanicYob Written May 24, 2006

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    The mayor's house in Roat��n

    According to our guide, this house surrounded by beautiful scenery is supposedly the mayor's house here in Roatán. I had to have a picture of it! It's not very secure as there's a simple chainlink fence surrounding the perimeter of the place. It's located near the roadside.

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