Unique Places in Honduras

  • Beauty of a sunrise
    Beauty of a sunrise
    by sltmjones
  • Entrance outside the National Stadium
    Entrance outside the National Stadium
    by bdougherty
  • Off The Beaten Path
    by bdougherty

Most Viewed Off The Beaten Path in Honduras

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    Los Naranjos Archaeological Park

    by traveldave Updated Jan 11, 2012

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    Los Naranjos Archaeological Park is an archeological site protecting the ruins of a settlement established by the pre-Columbian Lenca Culture on the northwest shore of Lake Yojoa. It is considered to be the second most important pre-Columbian site in Honduras, after the Mayan ruins at Copán. The settlement was established in about 700 B.C., and it flourished for almost 2,000 years.

    Compared to most Mayan ruins, the ruins at Los Naranjos Archaeological Park are not very impressive. The ruins have only been partially excavated because they are made of clay, and total excavation would expose them to the elements.

    The site comprises 370 acres (150 hectares), most of which is covered by forest. There are four miles (six kilometers) of well-maintained trails through the forest and around the ruins. A visitors' center and small museum provide a general overview of the Lencan civilization. The administrators of the site focus on environmental education, teaching local school children about the relationship between humans and their environment, from prehistory to the present.

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  • La Moskitia with La Ruta Moskitia!

    by beoutside Written Dec 5, 2009

    The week I spent in La Moskitia was the most memorable travel I have ever had. I went on a tour organized by La Ruta Moskitia, a local organization that works with the locals to put all profits back into their communities. They were very well organized, but I still got to feel like I was immersed in the culture - no westerners taking care of your every move. Perfect for people who like to be independent & adventurous travelers but who don't want to spend days figuring things out. It was a total cultural experience and the scenery - well, let's just say that you can't ever think you're in the States.

    Related to:
    • Eco-Tourism
    • Jungle and Rain Forest

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    The Aguán Valley

    by traveldave Updated Mar 27, 2008

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    Most people who visit Honduras will never travel to the remote and dry Aguán Valley. The reason is that there is absolutely nothing in the area that would attract most tourists. However, for birdwatchers this is one of only two or three arid valleys in Honduras where the endemic Honduran emerald can be found. This highly endangered species of hummingbird is found nowhere else in the world.

    The Honduran emerald prefers arid thorn scrub, but much of this habitat has been cleared for cattle grazing. The Honduran government is trying to save the remaining habitat for this bird which should be considered a national treasure. Many parts of the Aguán Valley are protected by the military from further degredation, and it is necessary to get permission to visit habitat where the Honduran emerald can be found.

    The Aguán Valley is dry because the east-west running Cordillera Nombre de Dios traps moisture coming in from the Caribbean Sea on its north slope, leaving the south slope, where the Aguán Valley is located, in its rain shadow. This means that relatively little rain falls in the valley. The plant life here is characterized by such dry-country species as thorn scrub, columnar cactus, and epiphytic-laden oaks.

    It is a long and difficult trip to the Aguán Valley. Although it is only about 15 miles (24 kilometers) from the Caribbean coast, there is no road penetrating the rugged mountains between the coast and valley. As a result, it takes about three hours to drive a circuitous route east from La Ceiba, south around the east end of mountains, then west toward the valley. And to slow the trip further, at the village of Olanchito the pavement ends, and it is necessary to drive slowly along a dusty, rutted dirt road farther down to the valley.

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    Trujillo

    by Gaiatouring Written Sep 5, 2007

    Blown away by Hurricane Mitch, tourism in Trujillo has never really returned. The former capital sits in a torpor on the North Coast opposite the heavily trafficked Bay Isles. It is a pity that Trujillo is neglected, for it is one of the most beautiful small towns in Central America.

    Trujillo is also of historical interest to travellers who know the tale of William Walker, the American who dreamed of making a Central American Empire in the 1850's. On his last of several expeditions in Central America, he was captured in Honduras, and brought to Trujillo to be shot by firing squad. You can visit his grave with a stunning vista of the jungle and bay below.

    the old fortress f Trujillo is a lovely small museum dedicated to the Walker story and the Spanish influence on Honduras. Sit on the old defensive walls and dream of the days of sailing ships and high seas adventure.

    For accomodation, the Irish Hotel a few blocks above the main square is outstanding value. The seafood joints along the wide sandy beaches below the town are also a must.

    Highly recommended.

    For a colorful travel story in the old town, check out:

    http://williamwalker.blogspot.com/2007/02/william-walker-fusilado.html

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Romantic Travel and Honeymoons

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    Copan Ruinas

    by alza Written Jul 18, 2006

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    Copan is in the WESTERN part of Honduras, in the centre of the NORTH-SOUTH borderline with Guatemala.

    CHIQUIMULA is the town in Guatemala closest to the border crossing into Honduras. Calculate about 2 hours from Chiquimula to EL FLORIDO, the hamlet where you cross the border on foot.
    Buses leave Chiquimula for El Florido all day, every hour. MAKE SURE to take a bus by 1 p.m. latest in Chiquimula! The border at El Florido is said to close about 5 p.m. but I arrived before 4 p.m. & barely made it. The officials had closed the wicket & were all saying goodbye to each other. The money-changers on the street signalled for me to rush over to the Customs & Immigration barrack, & even asked the official to wait for me. Thanks guys!

    Once you've paid your way out of Guatemala & into Honduras (get lempiras from the money-changers), walk over to the small busses, minivans & trucks waiting to take you to COPAN RUINAS, 12 kms further (about 20 minutes.)

    I don't remember how much I paid for the old van that took me from El Florido to Copan. It seemed a bit much for such a short journey but Copan is THE destination from El Florido & the owners of those busses are all vying for your business.
    I chose to go with the first van owner who approached me because he was nice & helpful with my baggage & he also promised to help me find a hotel in Copan Ruinas.

    I went from CHIQUIMULA to EL FLORIDO by taxi, the road was beautiful & it only took about an hour. I had gone to the Terminal in Chiquimula in the morning, to enquire about bus schedules but it was very chaotic. Terminal employees tell you one thing, then you walk out in the street & 10 men are inviting you on "their" bus, none of which show their destination. And they're all leaving right now... I had to go back to the hotel to get my luggage! So that's why I took a taxi, right at my hotel door...

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    Las Marias - Trekking

    by epicult Updated Oct 28, 2005

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    If you're up for adventure, this is a trip for you. Not so much for its strenous activity but for its sheer logistical challenges. Lush jungle, lovely Pech and Moskito people, and some of the most amazing wildlife I've seen in all my jungle adventures, including the Amazon. A little on the expensive side; about 450 USD w/ a guide and about 350 or so without for 5 days... but very nice!

    Jorge and his brother Mino at Moskitia Eco-Aventuras are a pretty good bet. Cash speaks, Visa carries a hefty service charge and Travelers checks are out of the question.

    It must be noted that you will not save alot of money by navigating into these parts yourself, unless you speak excellent Spanish and Moskito and have mastered the art of negotiation. Local guides have a solid network and will save you many headaches, unless of course you have lots of time and patience, as logistics can be an absolute nightmare!

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Jungle and Rain Forest

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    A Trip with the Locals

    by Small_World Updated Jul 9, 2005

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    The people I was staying with in Juticalpa invited me to go out into the countryside with them. I have no idea where this picture was taken, except for the fact that I was riding in the bed of a pickup truck. It wasn't a bad way to be immersed into the daily living, although there were telltale signs that the truck had been used to haul manure. I'm just grateful they emptied the truck before we rode in it. :-)

    The scenery was beautiful enough to take my mind off things.

    Related to:
    • Farm Stay
    • Arts and Culture

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    Walking to Honduras

    by thelukey Written May 16, 2005

    I’m told that much of the mountainous region of the departments of Ocotepeque, Lempira, Intibuca, and La Paz along the Salvadoran border is good hiking /trekking territory. So far, my travels in that area have been limited to walking across the rickety hanging bridge over the Sumpul River that connects the small villages of Petapa (El Salvador) and Olosingo (Honduras), and swimming in the very clean waters of the Río La Garza on the Honduran side.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Budget Travel

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  • Trienfa de la cruz

    by secretmachines Updated Apr 14, 2005

    This is a beautiful Garifuna town of which I was really fortunate to be able to be accepted by the community. The beaches are beatiful but is packed from visitors during the day. The beaches are free and practically deserted around 8 in the morning. If you visit the nature preserve near by you may hear the howler monkeys. I highly reccomend staying in the new cabins that the local women's group has been building for the last couples months. The project will benefit the town and may prevent the further damage the tourist industry has done.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • National/State Park
    • Beaches

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  • Guide

    by Tizzytom Written Feb 26, 2005

    There are several little kids about 10-14 years old running aroudn the streets. They will take you wherever you want to go (with good information) and walk you door to door.

    WATCH OUT

    they force you at the end to pay them .. or else...

    this didnt just happen to me but several other travelers....

    say no thank you or be ready to pay them 5-10 dollars US

    Related to:
    • Cruise

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    Most of the interior is hard...

    by vaticanus Updated Feb 13, 2005

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    Many areas of the interior are accessible but hard to get to. From Guatemala, the road runs around a large central area of mountains to reach San Pedro Sula and then the capital. Pick ups are still the primary means of transportation once you leave the few main roads.

    Honduras is still a country of horses. If you like a frontier environment then Honduras is where you want to go.

    And if you don't like primitive, well I am told the Carribean coast is very popular for snorkling, swimming, rum and everything that goes with seaside R&R.

    Related to:
    • Hiking and Walking
    • Camping
    • Horse Riding

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    PUERTO CORTES

    by kiwigal_1 Updated Oct 21, 2004

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    Puerto Cortes is a port city to the north west of San Pedro Sula. It is best reached by bus from SPS. There is a beach here but it isn't as nice as Tela in my opinion. The main attraction for me here was the Omoa Fort. The hotel that we stayed in was called Hotel Costa Azul located on the Coca Cola Beach on the waterfront. The rooms were very comfortable and the hotel had a pool, billiards table and restaurant facilities. I think it cost about 250 Lempiras per night.

    For more pictures of El Castillo de Omoa in Puerto Cortes please take a look at my Omoa page.

    Related to:
    • Castles and Palaces
    • Archeology
    • Budget Travel

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    Poorest areas of Tegus

    by janchan Updated Apr 21, 2004

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    Getting around one of the poorest neighborhood of the capital, called 'Alemania'. We went to visit a school and a sewing factory, supported by the organization "Save the Children". Even here big smiles, especially from the kids... :)

    Related to:
    • Arts and Culture

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    A beach worth beating a path to!

    by epicult Updated Aug 11, 2003

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    Tujillo has very nice beaches. I must admit I'm not a big 'beach' lover, but these stretches are truly spectacular. Staying at Campamento (a few miles out of town... take a taxi or hitch hike) we never saw a person within miles on these beaches, besides the owners of course. The accompanying picture pretty much tells all.

    It's quite easy to get to Campamento, just ask for directions and hitchhike. It's safe as long as you do it during daylight hours. The first vehicle will probably pick you up and it's alot cheaper than a cab! Out of respect, offer the driver a tip to help cover gas and show your appreciation. See my Accommodations Tip as well.

    Related to:
    • Backpacking
    • Beaches

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    Walpaul-bansirpe petroglyphs

    by epicult Written May 26, 2003

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    About 4 hours up river from Las Marias (via dugout pipante) you will come to the Walpaul-bansirpe petroglyphs. Not a whole lot to see but interesting none-the-less. The local guides are funny, entertaining and an overall joy. They work very hard propelling these dugouts UP the river and get a little silly (always wanting to practice their English) on the way down. The trip gives incredible views of the jungle and affords bird lovers an opportunity of a lifetime.

    Related to:
    • Archeology
    • Backpacking
    • Jungle and Rain Forest

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Honduras Hotels

See all 70 Hotels in Honduras

Top Honduras Hotels

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34 Reviews - 20 Photos
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Honduras Off The Beaten Path

Reviews and photos of Honduras off the beaten path posted by real travelers and locals. The best tips for Honduras sightseeing.
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