Fun things to do in Saint Kitts and Nevis

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Most Viewed Things to Do in Saint Kitts and Nevis

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    Romney Manor

    by cjg1 Updated Nov 25, 2013

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    One of the stops along our tour of St. Kitts was Romney Manor. This is a 17th century estate which boats a large ten acres of property and had a large sugar cane crop. Romney Manor was once owned by the great Grandfather of President Thomas Jefferson (Sam Jefferson II). It was later owned by the Earl of Romney; hence the name Romney Manor. The grounds of the Manor were once the village of Carib indians.

    During our visit we explored the beautiful gardens of the property; watched a Caribelle Batik demonstration; explored the ruins of the sugar cane processing area and saw the 400-year-old Saman tree on the property. We had an excellent time watching the Batik demonstration and perusing the merchandise. The garden were very nice; lush with interesting flora and fauna.

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    Brimstone Hill Fortress

    by cjg1 Updated Nov 19, 2013

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    My wife and I had the pleasure of touring the Brimstone Hill Fortress National Park during our visit to St. Kitts. The Fortress itself was a highlight of the tour and is also an UNESCO World Heritage Site.

    The Fortress is also called the "The Gibraltar of the West Indies", meaning it is supposedly invulnerable. The Fortress is set high up the hill giving it some incredible views that also means a military advantage of seeing the enemy coming.

    The fort was abandoned by the British in 1853, until 1973 when it was restored and later declared a National Park in 1987. In 1999 it became a World Heritage Site. The fortress was constructed during a hundred year period from 1690-1790; using slave labor for construction. The fortress is constructed mostly of limestone and mortar which must have been quite the undertaking without modern construction equipment and the steepness of the hill.

    My wife and I began our tour by walking up the Alphabet Steps ( a series of 26 steps) leading up to the fortress itself. Our tour allowed us to explore the Citadel, Western Place of Arms, Eastern Place of Arms, Magazine Bastion, Orillon Bastion, the quarters and Fort George Museum. My wife and I are military history buffs and thoroughly enjoyed our explorations.

    The best part of this tour are the amazing panoramic views of the area. We had a bit of a cloudy day so the view was not as perfect as it can be; but the views were still specatcular to us. This was a highlight of the visit for both of us. If we visit the island again; I will definitely return here.

    **There is an admission fee: Residents - $6.00 E.C ; Visitors - $10.00 U.S and Children - Half Price. Our admission fee was included in the tour price. If you would like an audio guide; they are available for rent at $5 a set. There is also a small girft shop, cafe selling drinks and food items and restrooms available by the carpark.**

    Brimstone Hill Fortress (Nov 2013)

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    Sugar Cane Genius

    by Assenczo Updated Mar 11, 2013

    Nevis is smaller and cuter than its bigger brother – St. Kitts. It has almost perfect conical shape with elevation high enough to collect clouds on permanent basis. Moreover, it possesses some very special soil features that make sugar cane go “bananas” and in the process enrich its owners to the tilt. Gradually though, with the development of new sources of sugar in Europe, its sugar production became less profitable just as in any other Caribbean island or even useful altogether but the populace did not despair. Nowadays the local government with the blessing of its big brother, St. Kitts, has moved into financials, a business that is way less dependent on weather or soils, and allows saving for a rainy day in case its little-big ambition of independence realises itself one day.

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    Dieppe Bay goose bumps

    by Assenczo Updated Feb 21, 2013

    Curious exposure to some unexpected undercurrents of St. Kitts’ social life can be obtained through a visit to some of the old plantations that have converted to inns and in this capacity show off the glory of the past through the practicality of the present. There are couple that are well advertised - Rawlins Plantation and the Golden Lemon. Well, the rumor that they are not operational started oozing down the pores of the 15 seat minibus but for non-believers this is not enough – they have to have a very hands-on cognitive approach. The sad truth of the matter (as dicovered so painfully) is that both are not in working order; the Golden Lemon has lost its proprietor to intrigue and the garden to a hurricane. The Rawlings Plantation has even juicier story to report going along the lines of the owner being indefinitely suspended till results of a murder case are figured out! Boy, who would believe that such horrific things might happen in Paradise!?!

    Decline beyond repair St. Eustatius says high to St. Kitts
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    Black Rocks that make you wonder

    by Assenczo Written Feb 19, 2013

    Black rocks area is touted by the now well entrenched into tourism marketing business literature which previously could claim that was independent with the aspirations of the independent traveler at heart. Well – no more. The result is another stop on the St. Kitts’ circular road well equipped with stalls to entertain and feed the masses. The rocks are not “jaw dropping” and might not be disappointing if there were no hyped up expectations. They are on the more exposed Atlantic side of the island and thus present a rougher picture of this idyll called St. Kitts compared to the placid waters at Basseterre for example. But there is not much more to it unless one counts the presence of the cutest little donkey, apparently just recently introduced to life on this planet. So rush down there to see it before it has lost its appeal to over exploitation on the plantations that are no more!

    Lava pulverized by water Sublime curiosity
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    Plantation royalty

    by Assenczo Written Feb 18, 2013

    Romney Manor is one of the few plantation houses left on the island of St. Kitts in particular and the Caribbean in general. The sugar cane production, once a mainstay of the colonial existence is in total shambles nowadays as the Europeans have embraced beats as raw material for sugar. Even worse, they have developed artificial sweeteners which are many times sweeter than the natural product thus practically eliminating the need for cultivating sugar cane altogether. In this situation Romney Manor is a beacon of bygone times and as such attracts the attention. Moreover, this property was at certain point in the hands of a man who had the honor to be the great-grand father of the American president Jefferson, a fact having the power of a 1000 volt magnet to the cruise ship clientele, naturally mostly American. The modern marketing conveniences aside, this shows the amount of money and prestige the islanders had and their ability to venture into poorer colonies, namely New England, and make a name and position for themselves to such an extend that to be able to bid for the highest office in a land. Of course, in order to reach such a point the pioneers had to kill the local inhabitants (poor souls they should have succumbed to civilization through slavery and everything would have been alright), assume ownership of their property (which was, of course, a God-given right to teach the heathens a lesson) and fend off French interests (very ambitious these French, eh). On the grounds a splendid tree towers over the estate. It has seen it all – from misery to fortune but luckily can’t talk.

    On top of earlier versions Rum production The Witness

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  • Adventures on the Last Railway in the West Indies

    by RailTraveler Written May 2, 2012

    To anyone visiting the St. Kitts, a trip on the St. Kitts Scenic Railway is one of the most unique ways to experience this unspoiled island. Even though it runs on 30-inch narrow gauge track, the train is made up of full-sized rail equipment, and it is not in any way an amusement park train as has been suggested elsewhere in earlier reviews. It also seems to be running quite reliably, and according to the Conductor on my trip does, the locomotive is very well maintained and very rarely has a mechanical issue: he said they have two good engines now, and have been running trains since 2002, for 9 years now (again, this confidence in the railroad's reliability - coming from one of the crew - is contrary to earlier reviews of the rail tour which appear to have been written by people who did not even take the train trip). Our train departed on time, and made its journey without incident.

    The SKSR passenger train runs on a railroad that was built by British engineers to carry sugar cane from the fields in to the central factory 1oo years ago (1912 - 2012), and it is the very last link between the tourism economy of the present and the now by-gone era when when sugar was the island's main economic engine. The trip is 18 miles (2 hours) by train and 12 miles (45 minutes) by railway-owned sightseeing bus for a total journey of 3 hours (30 miles). It circles the entire island. The modern rail cars are double-decked: the view from the top observation level is fantastic, as you can see right out over the top of the tallest island vegitation. The lower level of the cars is air-conditioned, has tables and wicker chairs for group seating, and each car has a nice air-conditioned restroom. The on-board staff serves very nice complimentary alcoholic and non-alcoholic drinks (as many as you like!), there is a running commentary about the points of interest and the history of the island. The train even has live entertainment: there is a three-member choir group that comes through the cars and sings Caribbean songs.

    On our train the locals in the villages and farmers in the fields would stop and wave at the train as it went by, and the pre-schoolers in one little town all ran out of their classroom and down to the edge of the schoolyard in their uniforms. They waved and yelled and went wild jumping up and down on the fence. I have never seen these kinds of reactions to visitors passing by when I have taken taxi tours in the other islands in the CAribbean: in fact, I haven't seen anything quite like this on any other island. The local people seem to have embraced this as "their train" in St. Kitts. As we came to the end of the train part of the tour, the choir sang the national anthem a three-part chapelle voice. It brought a lump to your throat. I didn't get the feeling that it was in any way a "touristy" thing to do (as one reviewer on this site did). Quite the opposite: I was told that the railway has 75 local people operating it, and that it is a major employer, especially in the villages where there is very little work. If there is such a thing as "sustainable" tourism, this railway would seem to be the last honest sustained link that connects the days of sugar cane to the new age of tourism.

    As a note to price, I did inquire (because I had seen reviews about how "expensive" the train tour is). I was told the St. Kitts railway has not raised its ticket price at their Needsmsut Station in 9 years. Their 3-hour train tour ticket remains priced at US $89 per person, the same as it was back in 2003. I did compare this with the White Pass & Yukon Railroad in Alaska, and their ticket price for their 3-hour train is US $119. I have ridden this train as well: it is very scenic, but they do not offer unlimited free drinks.

    I enjoy train travel where ever I go around the world because trains seem to show off the "real" colors of a country in ways that can only be seen from this type of transportation. You get the feel of a place, and of the people. You see the fluttering clothes on the line, and the naked toddler in the tin bath tub in the backyard. Some people who don't travel much would consider this to be a view of poverty. I consider it the real reason to get out of the house and travel to somewhere new.

    I would recommend this tour to anyone who agrees.

    Rail Traveler

    St. Kitts Scenic Railway train
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    Romney manor - Home of Caribelle Batik

    by shargurl Updated Apr 4, 2011

    Romney Manor is set on 10 acres and has only had 6 family owners. Sam Jefferson (which is the great,great...grandfather of Thomas Jefferson), once owned this place. The Gardens are lush and beautiful. There is also a saman tree, which is 350 year old and covers a 1/2 an acre. Beautiful.

    Now Romney Manor is the home to Caribelle Batik, all batik products are produced right here. It is said that Caribelle is the most sought after batik product in the Caribbean.

    On the day we went there there were children dressed up in colorful garb doing a dance. It was lovely. (see pic)

    The saman tree Beautiful fan Plam
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    The St. Kitts Scenic Railway

    by Marianne2 Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Railway Tour is a wonderful concept in theory, and to some travelers, a not-to-be-missed highlight. However, website opinion is divided, with the other half echoing my view that it’s not worth the $89 fare.

    The theme-park-like train runs on a narrow gauge track, encircling the island. The entire tour is 30 miles long, of which 18 miles is by train, and the remaining 12 miles by coaches. The train proceeds non-stop through rainforests, fields, and hamlets. Any sites of historical interest are too far away to view – such as the Brimstone Hill Fortress and Romney Manor.

    However, from my train in March 2006, we didn’t even see the rainforests. We boarded and chose our seats on the open-air upper deck (lower level is A/C), with great views, albeit stationary ones of the nearby airport. We were served complimentary rum punches, given a brief introduction, and serenaded by a creole group. The train didn’t budge. The engine was broken, and repair efforts failed.

    We were then loaded onto a bus for a consolation round-the-island drive, but we still didn’t stop anywhere of interest, except Black Rocks (photo #2), which I would scarcely call exciting.

    Caveats before you decide on the train:
    (1) The train is designed for cruise passengers, great numbers of which are disgorged every day here. The train was set up with this market in mind by whiz-tourism-guy Steven Hites, who also managed to Disneyfy Skagway’s White Pass & Yukon train. He once stated, “My job is to Walt Disney Alaska.” Well, the Caribbean also?
    (2) Potential mechanical problems.
    (3) Lack of sites of interest, due to no stops.
    (4) The price is too high for value received.

    Next time, I will hire a day taxi and guide to do some thorough sightseeing for an equal or lesser price. The highlight of our day was an impromptu taxi ride – with talkative driver-guide -- to the island’s southern end, whose narrow peninsula boasts the Atlantic on one side and the Caribbean Sea on the other (photo #3). Of course, by then it was raining!

    Rum punches aboard the stationary train Black Rocks -- ho, hum. Great views of the Atlantic and Caribbean Sea
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    The Greatest beach on Saint Kitts

    by m1nkey Written Apr 3, 2011

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    We arrived at South Frigate Bay around 10 AM ready to play at the beach. What we found there was a shallow clean beach with a coral reef. A few spots to get a drink or eat, and a very cool place to hang out. Now our tastes vary depending on the circumstance. And for a pleasant day at the beach, this was it. We plopped down in the beach chairs with a homemade palm leave umbrella, in front of The Shipwreck Bar. It was made of unfinished wood and picnic tables. It reminded me of the primitive forts I used to build as a child.
    But this place was awesome! It was laid back, the food was good and the overall feel was relaxing. The music was good and not too loud, the crowd was mainly an over 30ish group with some families as well. It seemed to be more locals and expatriates than tourists.
    We rented a jet ski there, had lunch and thoroughly enjoyed the afternoon. It was the kind of beach you see in the postcards. Long, virtually empty with coconut palms waving in the breeze.
    It may seem too rustic for everyone's tastes, but this has been our best time on the beach on Saint kitts.

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    The Strip at Frigate bay

    by m1nkey Updated Jan 16, 2011

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    We were directed to the strip in Frigate bay to find a place for nightlife and dancing. What we found were a string of cabanas to drink and eat and not much else. There are at least a dozen bars and many of them have food. And at each end there is a more permanent structured restaurant. We did not see anything that resembled a dance floor. So if you like to drink a lot and stumble drunk dance then this is the place for you. The beach was beautiful and the views, spectacular. But forus the search for a dance floor continues.

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    Saint Kitts' Beaches

    by Pieter11 Updated Jul 28, 2009

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    The Southern part of Saint Kitts is all about beaches. Beaches in a lot of different ways.

    If you are looking for a place to party, to eat and drink and to have a great time at a great location, then the beach at Frigate Bay is where you should go to. This is where the party starts every night and where all popular bars and restaurants of the island are located directly at the sandy beach and at only 20 metres from the Caribbean Sea.

    Further to the southeast there are more, smaller beaches where you can be all alone when you're lucky, and where you can find great places to surf or to swim. These beaches are hidden behind the hills, and are a great surprise when you end up at one of them.

    And then there is the area around Turtle Beach, at the very South of the island. From here you are very close to neighbour Nevis. Turtle Beach is a popular beach for suntanning, but also a great place to have a good lunch, to play a game of volleyball, or to have a swim. The views from here are fantastic!

    Hanging around at a hidden beach Sunset at Turtle Beach Partying at the beach of Frigate Bay Lunch at Turtle Beach Great views from Turtle Beach
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    The Southern Loop

    by Pieter11 Updated Jul 27, 2009

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    Basseterre, the capital of Saint Kitts, is situated exactly at the point where the island is devided in two. The northern part contains the high mountain range of the island while the southern part becomes very narrow, quite flat and very empty at the same time.

    All around the southern peninsula you will find the beaches that attract a lot of people to the island. But even though these beaches are quite popular it still is very easy to find one that is completely empty and where you have everything for yourself alone. Just rent a car or a scooter and take a small road or the mainroad and you're almost sure to end up at a beach.

    But besides the beaches there are quiet saltponds, great viewpoints from where you can see the neighbouring island Nevis, and hills with dry forests on them where the green velvet monkey hides. These monkeys were taken here from Africa by the French when they were the boss on the islands, and they obviously are havng a great time there because they can be found everywhere in the south of Saint Kitts.

    The most narrow point of Saint Kitts Somewhere in there, there's a monkey... Nevis seen from Saint Kitts Nevis hidden in the clouds On the beach on Saint Kitts
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    The Northern Loop

    by Pieter11 Written Jul 27, 2009

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    One of the most famous attractions on the island of Saint Kitts is the "St Kitts Scenis Railway". This railway used to be an important way of transport in the sugarcane era, but nowadays it is a very touristic attraction where cruiseship passengers are being loaded into this little train and taken around the island in an hour or two.

    Although the tour that the train makes is a very interesting one, I thought this was a bit too touristy for me. Instead me and my hosts on the island went for the same Northern Loop around the island by car. The same route, but a lot more relaxed if you ask me.

    The route takes you to great viewpoints, like in the northwest where you can see the islands Statia and Saba being very close. To the central area of the island where you can see the unspoiled jungle of the island, to the Atlantic Coast where the landscape is rough and to the northern part where you're crossing the sugar plantations.

    A trip like this, from Basseterre to Basseterre will take you about 2 hours minimum and with a few stops un the way a bit longer. It's a great trip for a morning program, and then still you'll have plenty of time to relax on the beach in the afternoon.

    A church on eastern Saint Kitts Forests in central Saint Kitts Wavind palmtrees in the north of the island Statia and Saba seen from Saint Kitts The rough east of Saint Kitts
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    Downtown Basseterre: Circle and Fort Street

    by Pieter11 Updated Jul 26, 2009

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    The other centre in Basseterre is the real centre, where the daily life of the Kittians takes place. This centre can be found around the central roundabout "Circle" and the mainstreet that start here that is called Fort Street.

    Circle is the place where you can find the taxi stand, some souvenir shops and almost all banks in the island. The rest of the centre is located along Fort Street, that goes straight north from Circle. Shops, small restaurants, loud soundsystems, street vendors and small bars are everywhere here and here you'll see where all the people in Basseterre hang out: the streets here are crowded all day long and cars fill the streets and can create chaos on Circle.

    At the end of Circle you end up at Bay Road and the Marina where the cruiseships arrive pretty much every day during the season. For the tourists too, a walk to the already busy area around Circle is often the first thing they do.

    Circle in central Basseterre A bar around Fort Street Soundsystems in Fort Street, Basseterre Circle in central Basseterre
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Saint Kitts and Nevis Hotels

Top Saint Kitts and Nevis Hotels

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