Butrint Things to Do

  • Things to Do
    by alyf1961
  • Things to Do
    by alyf1961
  • Things to Do
    by alyf1961

Most Recent Things to Do in Butrint

  • Askla's Profile Photo

    The Museum.

    by Askla Updated Jul 2, 2014

    The Museum was reopened in 2005 after being refurbished. It is located within the reconstructed castle on the hill top.
    Entrance to the museum is included in the entrance fee to the archeological site as a whole. It is open from 09.00 until 16.00.
    A plaque inside told it was prohibited to take photos, with or without flash.

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    Festival.

    by Askla Written Jul 2, 2014

    An international festival of theatre is held every year on top of the hill. From the beginning in 2000 it was held in September but now it's in July instead.
    I post a link to the homepage here.

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    The Triangular Fortress.

    by Askla Written Jul 2, 2014

    The Triangular Fortress which can be seen on the other side of the Vivari strait, was built between 1490 and 1540 by the Venetians, while the towers were added later.
    To get there one can take a small cable ferry.

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    The Lion Gate.

    by Askla Written Jul 2, 2014

    The Lion Gate got its name from the relief above the entrance. The relief shows a lion eating from a bull. However, it was not part of the original wall, only was placed here in the 5th century AD, in order to reduce the size of the gate and make it easier to defend. The relief itself comes from a temple building and may date from as early as the 6th century B.O.T.

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    The Basilica.

    by Askla Written Jul 2, 2014
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    Following the pathway you will soon reach the basilica. It was built at the same time as the baptistery, in the second quarter of the 6th century, but it has been rebuilt a few times. There is a mosaic floor beneath the present flagstone floor. The mosaic was probably laid by the same craftsman as in the baptistery since they are similar in style.
    The basilica was not the only church within the premises, there have been found eight other this far.

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    The Baptistery.

    by Askla Written Jul 2, 2014

    After leaving the theatre you will in a few minutes reach the famous baptistery. It is the second largest one in the territory of the former Eastern Roman Empire after Haghia Sofia in Istanbul (which was built as a church and later converted into a mosque).
    The extraordinary mosaic floor has been dated to the second quarter of the 6th century. It is the most complete and also most complex mosaic of all surviving baptisteries of the period. It is nowadays covered by a layer of sand and gravel to protect it. Hopefully there can be money risen to build a more visitor-friendly kind of shelter. I have seen photos of the mosaic and I can just say they are stunning in colour and composition. What a craftmanship!

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    The Theatre.

    by Askla Written Jul 2, 2014
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    The theatre was discovered only in the late 1920s by the Italian archeologist Luigi Maria Ugolini. The first theatre was built in the Greek style and is thought to have been used by worshippers and priests of the sanctuary for religious ceremonies and public discussions. It was quite small but was soon extended. Seating was organised following a hierarchy, with the seats closest to the stage reserved for the most prominent citisens.
    In the 2nd century the theatre was rebuilt and enlarged in the Roman style with a stage. It was the centrepiece of the town. It is estimated to have had the capacity of 2.500 people.

    On the surrounding walls are numerous inscriptions that record the freeing of slaves in honour of the god, Asclepius. They are dated to around 230 B.O.T and spann over 60 years.

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    The sanctuary of Asclepius.

    by Askla Written Jul 2, 2014

    The sanctuary of Asclepius sits on a terrace close to the theatre. It was built in the 4th century B.O.T.
    Asclepius was the most important of the healing gods of antiquity. His father was Apollo and mother was a human woman. Asclepius himself was married to Hygieia, who has given us the word "hygiene". He was so skilled at his art of healing that he soon was regarded as a god. The legend has it that he in fact became so skilled that he was able to bring the dead back to life. That angered Zeus so much that he killed Asclepius.
    The main attribute of Asclepius was a staff with a snake coiled around it, the same symbol which is still used for pharmacies in many countries, including Sweden. This symbol also appears on many of the earliest coins minted at Butrint.
    The largest sanctuary to Asclepius was at Epidaurus, but sanctuaries have been found also in Athens, Corinth abd in Rome. They were most often situated outside or on the outskirts of cities, often close to rivers or the sea. This location not only provided isolation for infectious diseases but also a quiet and peaceful environment to assist the healing process. The essential part of the healing rite was the sleep in which the god would appear in a dream, and suggest cures or remedies.

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  • Avieira67's Profile Photo

    Butrint City - Archaeology

    by Avieira67 Updated Apr 23, 2014

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    The Greek Theatre
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    Amphitheater [3rd century B.C.] - The stone banks of seating [twenty-three rows have been preserved] would have held an audience of 1,500. The theater is situated at the foot of the acropolis, close by two temples, one of which is dedicated to the Greek god of medicine [Asclepios]. Approximately thirty inscriptions, written in ancient Greek, carved the western facade of this temple, and another hundred or so found on a tower which was rebuilt in the 1st century B.C., are the only examples of writing discovered in Butrint. These inscriptions are mainly concerned with the liberation of slaves.
    Baptistery [circular in shape] - Is one of the finest buildings from the early Christian period. The actual font and bath is at the centre, and it had steps on both sides. It was supposed you went down one side, then had your sins washed away and emerged the other side a newly minted Christian.
    Cathedral - Is definitively the grandest monument still standing. It was reused in the 13th century when Butrint was refounded by the Venetians, and this rebuilding dates to that period.

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  • alyf1961's Profile Photo

    VISIT THE WORLD HERITAGE SITE

    by alyf1961 Written Mar 27, 2013
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    Butrint is a UNESCO world heritage site in Albania, 20 KM from Saranda.
    Butrint was originally a sanctuary dedicated to Asclepius, the Greek god of medicine. People would visit the sanctuary to be healed. The area was built into a complex by the Greeks with a Temple, a Theatre and a hostel for the pilgrims that were coming to be healed. Everything that was built was funded by the pilgrims leaving money and gifts for the gods.
    The Romans arrived at Butrint in 44BC when Caesar designated it a Roman colonial city. Augustus (Caesars adopted son) expanded the city after defeating Antony and Cleopatra at nearby Actiumin in 31BC.
    The Romans built a new aqueduct and a bridge across the Vivari channel.
    In the 2nd Century AD Butrint was rebuilt and enlarged in the Roman style. A Baptistry and a great Basilica were built in the 6th Century, these were discovered in 1928 by Italian archaeologist Luigi Maria Ugolini. It was the second largest Baptistery in the Eastern Roman Empire behind Hagia Sofia in Istanbul.
    The collapse of the Roman economy left the city abandoned and the Slavs arrived around 580AD. They were followed by the Norman adventurer Robert Guiscard in 1081. The Byzantines soon followed who continued to struggle for control of the area along with the Venetians. The Venetians bought Corfu and Butrint where they built a fort to protect the area from the Ottomans. The Venetains ruled there until the end of the 18th Century.
    Albania gained independence at the London conference of Ambassadors on the 17th December 1912.

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    Lake Butrint

    by mickeyboy07 Updated Jun 8, 2009

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    Lake Butrint
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    Lies in the south of Albania between Sarande and Butrint Archaeological site,it is in fact a Lagoon.It overlooks the Ionian sea and is quite large in size.The locals catch many muscels here and they are sent to Sarande and other nearby towns for the restuarants,they are a dark yellow colour and very tasty.

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    Butrint Achaeological site

    by mickeyboy07 Updated Jun 8, 2009

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    Theatre
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    Increasingly becoming a popular tourist destination attracting day trippers from Corfu,the ferry takes about 90 minutes.There is a regular bus service between Sarande and Butrint.
    Butrint is a UNESCO world heritage site,this ancient Greek city lies 14 km south of Sarande close to the Greek border.It was known in antiquity as Bouthrotios in Ancient Greek and Buthrotum in Latin.First achaeological evidence of settled occupation dates between 10th and 8th centuries B.C..Original settlement sold food to Corfu and had a fort and a sanctuary,it was in a strategically important position due to its access to the straits of Corfu.By the 4th century B.C. it had grown in importance and included a theatre.
    In 31 B.C. Emperor Augustus fresh from his victory over Antony and Cleopatra at the Battle of Actium drew a plan to make Butrint a veterans colony.The new residents expanded the city and contructed an aqueduct,Roman baths,a forum complex and a nymphaeum.In the 3rd century A.D. an earthquake destroyed much of the city,excavations revealed that the city was already in decline,however the settlement survived until the late antique era,becoming a major port in the province of Old Epirus.By the 7th century Butrint had shrunk to a much smaller fortified post and with the collapse of Roman power was briefly controlled by the first Bulgarian power before being regained by the Byzantine Empire in the 9th century.
    In the following centuries the area was the site of conflict between the Byzantines and the Venetians and the city changed hands many times.In 1797 Butrint came under French control when Vencice ceded it to Napoleon,later the Ottoman Empire conquered it until it became part of Albania in 1912.By that time the site of the original city had been unoccupied for several centuries and was surrounded by malarial marshes.
    Entry to Butrint Achaeological site is 700 Leke(about 6 Euros)for non-Albanians,though most trips from Corfu booked with a tour operator to Albania include the entry fee.

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Butrint seen from Corfu

    by JLBG Updated Nov 17, 2008

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    Butrint seen from Corfu
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    On this photo, taken from Corfu, the Vrine plain is on the right. On the left, the entrance into the mouth of the Vivari canal. In the background (second level), the hill should be the hill of Butrint.

    The second photo is a close up on Butrint’s hill.

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Venetian triangular fort

    by JLBG Updated Jul 8, 2007

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    Butrint, the main tower of the Venetian fort
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    I have decribed under Konispol the first part of our travel from Greece (Igoumenitsa and Sagiada) to Butrint via Konispol. When we arrived close to Butrint, the triangular Venetian fort is the first part of Butrint that can be seen. Together with the old settlement of Butrint, the Venetian fort locks the Vivary channel, an important waterway connecting the Straits of Corfu and the Ionian Sea with the inland saltwater Lake Butrint . In 1453, the Venetians built a triangular fortress to strengthen the port's defenses against attacks by the Ottoman forces. It is given as dating from the Angevin and Venetian period.

    The first photo shows the round tower at its southern end, along the road.

    The second photo shows the western wall, with a topless round tower on its corner. In the background, the Venetian castle on top of Butrint settlement.

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  • JLBG's Profile Photo

    Butrint, Vrine plain and mouth of the Vivari canal

    by JLBG Written Jul 8, 2007

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    Butrint, Vrine plain and mouth of the Vivari canal
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    These four photos show different aspects of the Vrine plain and the mouth of the Vivari canal. They show well how marshy is this part of the land, with gullies that try to drain the land. In the far background, the island of Corfu with mount Pantokrator.

    The second photo was taken in 1988 and the third in 2007, almost from the same place. Nothing seems to have much changed here.

    The fourth photo is a close up on a small fort standing in the middle of the marshes, at the very far end of the canal and that was the first protection to lock it when needed.

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Butrint Things to Do

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