Horse Wash - Pferdeschwemme, Salzburg

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    Horse wash
    by balhannah
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    by IreneMcKay
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    KAPITELSCHWEMME [HORSE WASH]

    by balhannah Updated Aug 12, 2012

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    Horse wash
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    When I first saw a photo of the Kapitelschwemme, I knew it was a sight I had to see in Salzburg.
    I found it, and wasn't disappointed!
    It was a luxurious pond, where the watering and washing of horses took place. The pond dates to 1732, when a new fountain was built. The ramp used by the horses to access the pond, leads straight up to the group of figures which include Neptune, God of the sea which is holding a trident and crown whilst mounted on a seahorse spurting water.
    It's beautiful!

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    Horse Wash and Toscanini Hof....

    by Maryimelda Written Oct 30, 2009

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    The Horse Wash.....
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    The rather pretty horse wash is located at Herbert von Karajan Platz and is one of two still operational in Salzburg. The other is further up near the Dom. Right around the corner is Toscanini Hof where outdoor music festivals are held in the summer. This is another "Sound of Music" setting. Unusual to see a central car park built into the cliff.

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  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    Pferdeschwemme

    by mvtouring Updated Nov 6, 2008

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    I am always amazed at the beauty of the horse wash. The "Pferdeschwemme" ( horse wash ) is located at the base of the Monchsberg cliffs. It was built about 320 years ago as a place where travelers could was their horses before they could enter the city.

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    Horse Wash

    by monkeytrousers Written Jul 19, 2007

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    The horse wash typifies the elegance of the city of Salzburg. If horses can wash and bath in these grand surroundings just imagine how the living areas and places of worship used to look like for thier owners.

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    A royal bath...for horses

    by dongix Updated Mar 7, 2007

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    Still along Monchberg, you'll find the Pferdeschwemme or Horse Pond built in 1693 by Fischer von Erlach. This is one of the two remaining horse ponds in Salzburg (remember the other one in Kapitelplatz?) and is the grandest. This is where the prized horses from the archbishop's royal stables are washed back then.

    Today it has no specific use other than being a beautiful relic of the glorious days of the prince archbishops and a testimony of the importance of horses in the Barouque period. The stables however is more significant to the present Salzburg as they host visitors during the famous Salzburg Festival.

    The statue dominating the pond called "The Horse Tamer" by Michael Bernhard Mandl was originally in a different direction. In 1732 Prince Archbishop Firmian commisioned to renovate the horse pond and so the statue was repositioned (turned 90 degrees) and elevated a bit. Josef Ebner painted the horse frescoes on the rear wall.

    I've learned that some people like to drop coins in the fountain just like what they do in Rome's Trevi Fountain. But it doesn't have that same "effect" no matter how you try to imagine it.

    More tip: Between the horse pond and the Festival Halls is a tunnel through Monchsberg called Siegmundstor (built between 1764 and 1767) or Neutor (preffered name by locals). This tunnel connects the Old town with the city districts of Riedenburg, Maxglan and Leopoldskron. On my visit to Salzburg, I only ignored this tunnel and never thought of crossing it and see what's on the other side. It's only now that I realized I've missed something - I've learned (from fellow VTer WrigleyTodd ) that it's got more nice cafes and shops and a little public walking path over Rainberg while on the other side is a nice little village with a street that takes you to Leopoldskron Castle. Hopefully on my next visit (if ever) I will have the chance to check this tunnel out.

    So if you're in Salzburg, don't miss it like I did.

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    Kapitelplatz - Neptune and giant chess

    by dongix Updated Mar 7, 2007

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    Neptune's fountain
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    If you're going back to the Kapitelplatz you probably must have browsed through the shops for souvenirs, but now do the first stop - visit Neptune's Fountain, found somewhere in the corner of the square. To me this fountain is not that grand but nevertheless interesting and it is actually built as a horse pond where the horses near the cathedral are are washed (This is one of the two horse ponds left in Salzburg).

    It was built in 1732 by the sculptor Anton Pfaffinger. This fountain reminds me of the the Trevi Fountain in Rome, only that it's a more modest version.

    Also in Kapitelplatz, just near the Dom is the giant Chess - your next stop. Locals actually play with the giant chess pieces and its very fun to look at them carrying those giant pawns or bishops or looking at them standing and thinking about their next move.

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    Just pferding ( horsing ) around.

    by hundwalder Updated Sep 30, 2006

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    baroque period pferd art

    The Pferdeschwemme ( horse wash ) is located almost directly at the base of the impressive Monchsberg cliffs. It was built about 320 years ago as a place where the horses of travellers could be washed prior to entering the city. Amazing that the people of the day all reeked of filth but the horses had to be clean. Not hard to imagine where Jonathan Swift got his ideas for his Baroque era satire of " Gulliver among the Hwyneums " ( sp ).

    Pictured here is an excellent example of 250 year old horse art etched into marble slabs. Pretty good art, but it is amazing how people who spent so much of their time around horses did not seem to know what these magnificent animals really looked like. It took another 100 years or so before Frederick Remington showed the world of art what a horse really looks like. I will show you this later on my Oklahoma City Cowboy hall of fame page.

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    They did not only wash bulls.....

    by Anjutka Updated Dec 14, 2005

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    Bull Washers is the popular nickname for the Salzburg citizens (it is not valid for the people living in the rest of the state of Salzburg - these rural people used their animals in an other way and so they never did care much about washing them) In the city you find the most luxurious baroque facilities to wash the horses. Originally was here a quarry which later was transformed to this horsewash. I guess that not all Salzburg horses could enjoy the privilege of a bath in he "Pferdeschwemme" as this horses bath is called. And it is probably strictly forbidden to wash the horses there nowadays.

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    Pferdeschwemme and natural city ramparts

    by hundwalder Updated May 19, 2005

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    Pferdeschwemme and Salzburg's limestone cliffs

    The Monchsberg limestone cliffs form a large part of the boundary of Salzburg altstadt on the southside of the river Salzbach. Most medieval Europeans built thick, high walls competely around their cities to protect themselves against invaders. The Salzburgers used natural obstacles such as these imposing cliffs to provide protection. The gate to altstadt is a long and impressive tunnel which ends just behind the horse monument shown here. As you walk through this long forboding looking tunnel you truly get the feeling that you are entering an old city of mystery, intrigue, and old world charm.

    The pferdeschwemme ( horse swim or wash ) was built in the late 1600's for the purpose of washing horses covered with road dirt, upon arrival in the city. The baroque era motto was clean horses and filthy disease ridden humans. The elaborate monument, statues, and horse art were added about 50 years later. The horse in the statue appears not to have missed too many trips to the oat bin( one pfat pferd ). Notice that the horses carved on the numerous marble slabs do not look very realistic. High Baroque architecture and art was elaborate and had an overdone look to it, including that of pferds.

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  • acemj's Profile Photo

    Pferdschwemme

    by acemj Updated Dec 8, 2004

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    The hill that the Old Town is set against is called the Monchsberg and a walk along the road just beneath the hill will bring you to this old horse-trough that was built in 1700 for the archbishop's riding school. Today, it is basically a well-decorated pond complete with equine themed murals and statues.

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    Fountains

    by sandysmith Updated Apr 17, 2004

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    horse fountain

    This is one of Salzburg's beautiful fountains.
    Its so huge as it was utilised by the horses from the archbishops stables to take a bath!. The sculpture on it is the "Horsebreaker" by MANDL - frescos also depictg fiery steeds.

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    Horse wash

    by TinKan Updated May 25, 2003

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    Horse wash

    At the bottom of the big hill that the fortress sits upon is the Horse wash (just like a car wash). The horses were brought in one side and walked through to the other end where they were groomed then stabled. This was the start of the hand wash car wash.

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  • IreneMcKay's Profile Photo

    The horse wash

    by IreneMcKay Written Jul 28, 2012

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    Horse paintings.
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    The Horsepond
    There is a lovely horse washing place with a horse statue and beautiful horse paintings on Sigmundsplatz.

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    The Horse Pond

    by pili Written Dec 7, 2003

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    The Horse Pond

    The Horse Pond, with murals of horses, was originally (in the 18th century) in front of the royal stables. This fountain was built for the purpose of watering the Archbishop' horses

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  • lorgnierl's Profile Photo

    horses monument

    by lorgnierl Written Oct 23, 2003

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    ok, two nices girls on a nice monument, i don t remmebr what about is it, if anyone could help me, thanks

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