Hall in Tirol Things to Do

  • Jesuit Monastery & church
    Jesuit Monastery & church
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Most Recent Things to Do in Hall in Tirol

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    BURG HASEGG & MINT MUSEUM

    by balhannah Updated Jun 24, 2014

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    Mint Tower
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    Hasegg Castle is located on the other side of the road to the old historic centre. It is worth going over to see the Castle that dates to the early 1300s. The building was originally erected to protect the salt mines, the shipping industry, the bridge across the river Inn and the old Roman Road.

    Then in 1477, Sigismund, Archduke of Austria established the Castle's Mint. The first dollar-size silver coin was struck in 1486 - the Guldengroschen. Between 1748 and 1768, Hasegg Castle became famous for its minting of silver Thalers of which it produced over 17 million specimens.
    The Thaler, is a silver coin used throughout Europe for almost 400 years.
    The mint ceased production in 1806 due to the Napoleonic Wars and the increasing lack of local silver resources.

    The mint in Hasegg Castle is a museum where demonstrations of historical minting techniques are given from time to time.

    You also see half a century of European coin history, learn the secrets of the mint masters and the incredible machines they owned.
    The main attraction at Hall Mint is the replica of the world's first coin minting machine from the Middle Ages. The only one of its kind anywhere in the world, it stands in exactly the same position as its 16th-century predecessor did, when it minted approx. 4,000 coins every day.

    I'm sure you would have noticed the Mint Tower, its a beauty that's topped with a copper roof. If you can, climb 186 steps to the top for views of Hall in Tirol and the scenic Karwendel mountain range.

    Opening times:
    Summer: April - October
    Tuesday to Sunday 10.00 am to 5.00 pm
    Monday is closed Last entrance 4.00 pm

    Winter: November - March
    Tuesday to Saturday 10.00 am to 5.00 pm
    CLOSED Sunday and Monday
    Last entrance 4.00 pm

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    DIE HEILIG GEIST CHURCH

    by balhannah Written Jun 24, 2014

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    Die Heilig Geist church
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    In the Lower town square is a church that is hidden away. I happened to notice it, went and tried the door and found I could enter. This Church is not like the others. The former hospital church or church of the Tertiary Sisters of St. Francis, was built in the 1342. The Tertiary Sisters took over the church mid-19th century.

    Inside, the interior is baroque which dates back to 1727. The Church isn't big, so a quick look will suffice.

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    MINING & SALT MUSEUM

    by balhannah Updated Jun 24, 2014

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    Bergbaumuseum

    I wasn't interested in seeing this Museum, but perhaps you will be, especially if you have never seen one like this before. It is known that salt was mined in the 13th Century in the Halltal valley.

    Hall Mining Museum, is a replica of the Halltal Valley Salt Mine. Inside the Museum everything is virtually exactly as it was left in the year 1967. This mine was worked in valley for 800 years. When salt was extracted from the rocks by water and via wooden tubes, the brine was brought to Hall where the excess water was boiled off. Pure, white rock salt remained.

    The building the Museum is located in, is the former storehouse of the salt works. Tours are given of the reconstructed salt mine, complete with pits, shafts, drills, tools, and a slippery wooden slide. It is meant to feel like a real mine.

    The town of Hall owes its foundation in 1303 and its enormous boom and wealth to the existence of salt.

    Guided tours of the reconstructed Salt Mine, complete with galleries, tools and shafts, are given Mondays, Thursdays and Saturdays at 11:30am and by appointment.

    Regular tours (all year):
    Monday, Thursday and Saturday at 11:30 am
    Duration of the tour: about 45 minutes
    Meeting point: Mining Museum,

    The Hall Mining Museum is located at the center of Hall in Tirol. An underground car park is situated within a three minutes’ walk from the Museum.

    ADMISSION
    Adult EUR 5.00
    with guest card EUR 3.00
    Children EUR 3.00
    with guest card EUR 2.00

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    ARCHDUCHESS MAGDALENA WELLS

    by balhannah Written Jun 24, 2014

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    Archduchess Magdalena well.

    In the Stiftsplatz (Monastery Square) is where I found the Archduchess Magdalena well.

    Archduchess Magdalena of Austria (1532-1590) was one of the daughters of the Roman-German King & later Holy Roman Emperor Ferdinand I, & his wife Anna of Bohemia & Hungary.
    Magdalena chose to “serve God." It was she who founded the religious community of Hall in Tyrol with the help of her two sisters. Jesuits were supposed to have total control of women in religious matters, this she didn't want. The Jesuits, fearing the possibility of a female section of their order, viewed her as a threat. She overcame their fear & obstinance by enlisting the help of her brother, Emperor Maximilian II, promising to place the female-run religious community into the hands of the Jesuits after her death.

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    JESUIT CHURCH & MONASTERY

    by balhannah Written Jun 24, 2014

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    Jesuit Church
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    The Jesuit college was founded in 1571 and a Grammer school in 1573, here in Hall in Tirol. The monastery was completely renovated between 1671 and 1684. The two churches on the Stiftsplatz are the only sacred buildings dating back to the late-Renaissance era in Tyrol. The church, consecrated in 1610, was turned into baroque in the 17th century. The monastery was dissolved in 1773.

    Archduchess Magdalena of Austria, the fourth daughter of fifteen children of Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor, and his wife Anne of Bohemia and Hungary, died in Hall in Tirol in 1590. She was buried in the Jesuit church in Hall in Tirol until 1706 when her remains were transferred to the convent church.

    The churches were open and well worth seeing inside. There is a lot of stucco work which is painted in grey and white. Good size paintings line the side walls. The Main Altar is beautiful and is set under the dome, it can only be viewed from a distance as wrought iron gates stopped me from going any further.

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    UPPER TOWN SQUARE (OBERER SQUARE)

    by balhannah Updated Jun 23, 2014

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    Upper Square
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    I have already reviewed some of the sights in the Upper Town square, there still is more to see here though!

    The Rathaus has its own Café. I didn't stop for a meal or anything, I just looked at the reliefs on the Rathaus wall beside the café. The outdoor eating area of the Café would have been inviting on a better weather day!
    A few steps further on, I came to the Marienbrunnen, quiet an unusual fountain with the water coming out of long Swan's necks attached to the face of a man, I liked it!

    Another interesting and very old building is the painted yellow Stubenhaus, built in 1508 (photo 2)

    In Photo 3, you can see the pink archway, this leads to St. Joseph's Chapel which is painted in the same colour and the to the church of St. Nicholas.

    If you come here at Easter time, then the square will be full of stalls for the Easter market.

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    ST JOSEPH'S CHAPEL

    by balhannah Written Jun 22, 2014

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    St. Josephs Chapel
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    St. Joseph's Chapel is a few steps away from the Parish Church of St. NIcholas.

    This Chapel was built in 1690 as a grave Chapel of the Counts of Khuen Belasy. The family crypt is under the western chapel area as well as a large number of bones and skulls.

    This octagonal building was painted pink, and had a dome and a turret with onion dome and a lantern in the back. For a long time, the Chapel wasn't accessible, now it is! Adjoining it, is a wall with a few
    It has lovely ceiling paintings from 1698, depicting Old and New Testament, scenes from the legends of Joseph.

    The central fresco on the ceiling lantern shows St..Josef in the circle of the saints. Behind him is Jesus and Mary and to his side are Saints Barbara, Catherine, Teresa of Avila, Elizabeth, Christopher, John the Baptist, John the Evangelist, John of Nepomuk, Ursula, Anthony, Francis Aloysius, Nicholas. The other side has paintings of the Apostles Peter, Paul and Simon next to the Pope. The Pope at the time of when the chapel was consecrated was Innocent XII.

    More ceiling paintings shows scenes from the life of Joseph: Joseph's dream and election as a protector of Mary, Nativity and Adoration of the Shepherds, Rest on the Flight and The Holy Family.
    There are many more paintings of saints and near the windows are flying angels and cherubs.

    .

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    SAINTS AGAPITUS AT ST. NICHOLAS

    by balhannah Written Jun 22, 2014

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    The other saint is Saint constantius in St. Nicholas church.

    Once again, there is controversy as Roman Martyrology lists several Constantiuses. Which one is at the church of St. Nicholas?

    Is it Saint Constantius of Rome, a priest who opposed the Pelagians, martyred in Rome in 418. Saint Constantius of Trier, who was killed along with several others in Trier during the Diocletian persecutions 287.
    Saint Constantius of Perugia, the first Bishop of Perugia, Italy, was martyred along with members of his congregation during the reign of Marcus Aurelius. He was beheaded in 170.
    Perhaps Saint Constantius, the son of Saint Simplicius and brother of Saint Victorian, who was martyred during the persecutions of Marcus Aurelius, in Marsica, Italy. This Saint Constantius, along with his father and brother were first tortured in different ways and then struck with the axe, obtained the crown of martyrdom. They were thrown into a chamber with snakes and scorpions and escaped being torn apart, only to be beheaded at Celano in 159.

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    SAINTS AGAPITUS AT ST. NICHOLAS

    by balhannah Written Jun 22, 2014

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    The Roman Martyrology lists seven saints named Agapitus. Here in St. Nicholas are the relics of Saint Agapitus of Palestrina. Evidently, there is controversy if they really are his bones, as they are meant to be in Palestrina, Italy and a few at Besancon, France.

    So, who was Saint Agapitus?
    As a young boy of 15 years, he was arrested by order of the Emperor Aurelian. According to the Roman Martyrology, he was first scourged and then “endured more severe torments, and was delivered to the lions by the Emperor’s order. Some how, he emerged unscathed from the Lions, so then he was struck with a sword and beheaded. This happened in 274. After this event, a Basilica was erected in Palestrina, Italy, at the site of his beheading.

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    WALDAUF CHAPEL

    by balhannah Written Jun 22, 2014

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    Waldauf chapel

    Another must see, is the Waldauf Chapel in the Parish Church of St. Nicholas.

    The Chapel was established in 1281 and was initially Gothic in style but through changes over the centuries, it is now of baroque appearance.

    The Waldauf Chapel, located in the northern part of the nave in St. Nicholas Parish church, is named after Florian Waldauf zu Waldenstein, an Austrian knight who bequeathed his collection of relics to the church upon his death in 1501. He was a private assistant to Emperor Maximilian I. Over time, he became a wealthy and powerful man who had a very unusual hobby. He chose to collect relics of grade-B saints from all over Europe. In 1501, his collection was opened to the general public.

    I didn't know these were in the Church, so it was quite a surprise to see a large collection of skulls and an assortment of bones carefully arranged on red velvet cushions. Each skull is veiled with a gauzy fabric, blurring its features, and each is crowned with a golden halo. All are named.

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    PARISH CHURCH OF ST. NICHOLAS - INTERIOR

    by balhannah Written Jun 22, 2014

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    St. Nicholas
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    I loved the interior of this Church, A MUST SEE!

    I didn't go much on the interior colours, they seemed to clash, and the frescoes were dark and didn't come out well in photos, probably because they were in the darkness of a very high vaulted ceiling.
    The church has much to see, so I was happy to have it to myself.

    At the choir vault, the main image is of city hall in the protection of the Virgin Mary and numerous saints. Surrounding this representation are images of the four Western Church Fathers ( Gregory , Jerome , Augustine and Ambrose ). The painting of the Baroque high altar, created in 1657, shows the seated Virgin Mary with the baby Jesus surrounded by angels, the martyrs Stephen and Lawrence, St.. Kassian and the patron Saint Nicholas. The nave has more ceiling paintings, these are depicting scenes from the life of the saint of the Church of St. Nicholas. The Church is full of frescoes!

    Some of the inside can only be viewed from behind lovely decorative wrought iron gates.
    There are several Altars in the church. The northern cross altar shows a plastic Crucifixion group in front of a Sacred Heart image.
    In the north aisle is Waldauf Chapel and St. Catherine's altar (around 1740), with several reliquaries, while the south aisle has the altar of St..John of Nepomuk. There is a carved statue of St. Joseph with the Child Jesus (1730). In both aisles are guild rods that are still carried in religious processions today!
    Under the organ loft are stations of the cross (1742) and next to the main entrance stands the baptismal font from the 14th century, to the left the stoup (1506).
    Finally, there is a nice organ with baroque ornaments that was built in 1689.

    When I looked down the main aisle, I could see that the Church was off-line [crooked] created by being added to over the years. You can make this out in the second photo.

    OPEN from dawn to dusk

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    PARISH CHURCH OF ST. NICHOLAS

    by balhannah Updated Jun 22, 2014

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    St Nicholas
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    I'm standing in the Upper town square and looking at the enormous Roman Catholic parish church of St. Nicholas - I was thinking, this church is rather big for this town!

    In any town of this size in 1281, the parish church would be smaller. It turns out, this church was much smaller too, that was until salt was found and brought work to Hall in Tirol. There were too many parishoners for the church, so in 1352, it was rebuilt and enlarged. Still people came here to settle and work, so in the 15th century, the Church was enlarged again in the gothic style that it is today.
    Because of all the additions to the church, the old presbytery in the core was retained and appears to be off-line from the rest.
    In the second half of the 17th century re-styling of the church in Baroque began, then in 1875, a fire destroyed the roof. The 67 metre tower with the onion dome was rebuilt and a new figure of St. Nicholas was added then.

    There are large grey arches where I walked through to enter the church, but what a surprise there was here, for on each arch was a memorial tablet. One was for Tyrolean freedom fighter Joseph Speckbacherstraße , who died in 1820 in Hall. Others are of various noblemen and prominent men and women, only I couldn't read who they were.
    Then on either side of the entrance door are old frescoes!

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    THE RATHAUS

    by balhannah Written Jun 21, 2014

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    Rathaus
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    The next interesting building I came across used to be the city Castle, no wonder it looked such a strong defensive building.
    Count Henry of Gorizia-Tyrol (1295-1335), who was also King of Bohemia for a short time called the Castle home. In 1406, he gave Duke Leopold IV of Habsburg, the building which is now used as the Town Hall. During the great fire in 1447, quite a bit of the building was destroyed, but it was rebuilt not long after. Today, it's a popular wedding venue.

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    CHECK THE MAP - WHICH WAY TO GO

    by balhannah Updated Jun 21, 2014

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    At the same roundabout, there is a map on the old stone wall of the historic centre and a pretty little fountain of three children and three frogs.

    I took a look at the map which is located on the old town wall that circles the town. Next a look at the streets and trying to decide which one to choose. They all look very interesting. One is very narrow and lined with tall narrow buildings, straight away I know I am going to like this town. As it's one of the lower streets, I make my choice by taking the uphill street (Waldaufstrasse), then I can wind my way down hill back to the car! The gothic house in the centre of the two streets is known as Nagglburg.
    I am sure which-ever you choose will be just as interesting as the other!

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    SALVATOR CHURCH

    by balhannah Written Jun 21, 2014

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    The Salvatorkirche, also known as Kirche zu Ehren unseres Herren und Erlosers, I found at the end of the Salvatorgasse where I was beginning my walk.

    The church was donated by one of Hall's citizens, Hans Kripp, and built between 1400 and 1406.
    It is inside where Johann Kripp and his family are buried. When a bomb landed and damaged the church, this was when the burial place of the Kripp family. The chancel wall is the gravestone emblem of the founder.

    These days, it is one of the few churches in Austria, which is as so-called private church property of their founding family, I wondered if this was why the Church wasn't open.
    At the beginning of the 16th century, it also served for a short time as a meeting place of the first monastic community within the city walls Haller. Inside the church is a painting of the Last Judgement dating back to 1418, one of the last examples of high-gothic paintings in the northern part of Tyrol.
    Also found after the bomb damaged the building were frescoes behind the Altar of Christ the Judge, Prophet and a Pope enthroned.

    Even though one is known to be a Pope, the PUZZLE IS - WHICH POPE?
    I wonder if you would know that answer as it is still an unsolved mystery.

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