Hofburg, Innsbruck

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  • Hofburg Palace
    Hofburg Palace
    by balhannah
  • Hofburg Palace
    Hofburg Palace
    by balhannah
  • Hofburg Palace
    Hofburg Palace
    by balhannah
  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    TOUR OF HOFBURG PALACE

    by balhannah Updated Jun 15, 2014

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    Brochure
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    I love seeing the insides of Palaces, so we did the tour of Hofburg Palace.

    As we fairly usually do, we start with the Grand Staircase. This one had been restored and led to the State Rooms where an Ancestral Gallery has portraits of the Habsburgs on display. We were taken to many rooms including where Emperor Francis Stephen died. On Maria Theresa's instructions the room was converted into a Court Chapel in 1766 and is still used for prayer today. We saw Towers and the public rooms Maria Theresa had furnished to the greater glory of the dynasty of Habsburg-Lorraine. The Guard Room, where the lmperial Guard kept watch, and the Dressing Room which marks the beginning of the private quarters in the Apartment. It has a wall painting with Chinese motifs from the time of Maria Theresa and was only discovered in 2009.
    Other rooms visited were the Salon of the Empress, the Vestry where a Baroque fresco on the ceiling was discovered during recent refurbishment and many others!

    There are so many we visited, that I have forgotten! I have left the best till last, and that is the Giants Hall, named such as it was originally decorated with a cycle of Hercules frescoes.
    It contains paintings of Maria Theresa's children and grandchildren.

    We enjoyed the tour but I was very disappointed as NO PHOTOS ARE ALLOWED

    GUIDED TOUR TO THE IMPERIAL APARTMENTS ADULTS 8 euros
    FREE ENTRY WITH INNSBRUCK CARD

    Museum opening hours
    March−August: From 9 a.m. − 5 p.m. daily; last admission 4.30 p.m
    Wednesday: evening opening until 7 p.m.; last admission 6.30 p.m.
    September−February: From 9 a.m. − 5 p.m. daily; last admission 4.30 p.m.

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    THE HOFBURG

    by balhannah Updated Jun 15, 2014

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    Hofburg Palace
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    This was my second Hofburg Palace, my first was in Vienna. Like the Palace in Vienna, this one belonged to the Habsburg dynasty, rulers of the Austro-Hungarian empire. They resided here in Winter, preferring Schonbrunn Palace, Vienna in Summer.
    It is currently the official residence of the President of Austria.

    The Hofburg wasn't that big in the beginning, but since additions of various residences, the chapel, museums, the Imperial Library, the treasury, the national theatre, the riding school, the horse stables and the Hofburg Congress Center, it is now a massive sized building.

    Twenty of the imperial rooms from the 18th & 19th centuries are open to the public.

    IF YOU ARE THINKING OF DOING THE TOUR OF THE ROOMS, REMEMBER NO PHOTOS ALLOWED.

    OPENING HOURS from 9am to 5pm with the last admission at 4:30.

    ADMISSION
    Adults 5 euros Children FREE INNSBRUCK CARD - FREE ENTRY

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  • Maurizioago's Profile Photo

    Visit the Imperial Palace.

    by Maurizioago Updated Jun 15, 2014

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    The Imperial Palace (Hofburg) was built by archduke Siegmund the Rich in Gothic style around 1460. It was rebuilt in Baroque style by emperess Maria Theresia between 1754 and 1773. Inside this palace there are 25 state apartments dating from 18th and 19th centuries and the Giants' Hall with many portraits of the Habsburgs.

    Some years ago it was allowed to take pictures inside the palace. Today it is not permitted any more.

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  • richiecdisc's Profile Photo

    Hofburg

    by richiecdisc Written Apr 28, 2014

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    Hofburg

    Ranking third in importance in Austria after Vienna’s Schörnbrunn and Hofburg Palaces, The Hofburg of Innsbruck was a former residence of the Habsburgs. The original structures date back to 1460 but countless additions and restorations dote its impressive past. It houses five themed museums today with a glimpse into the splendor of the time of the Habsburgs.
    With such a short visit and stunning weather, there was no time for us to venture into the massive and sprawling complex. Hope to return one day soon.

    More fine architecture in Innsbruck is here

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  • antistar's Profile Photo

    Kaiserliche Hofburg

    by antistar Updated May 21, 2013

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    Hofburg, Innsbruck

    This great palace is tucked in between the cathedral and the Golden Roof, stretching along Renweg. This magnificent and imperious building was the responsibility of Archduke Siegmund the Rich, who had it constructed in the Gothic style in the 15th century. From a distance on the outside, along Renweg, it doesn't look all that different from the elegant Georgian buildings of Britain, but close up and in the courtyards inside it displays a traditional Germanic style, with the layers of yellow and white colours.

    Along the roofs are what like (possibly ornamental) chimneys with triple archways. If you look carefully you will see that the ornamental chimney near the Hofkirche (Court Church) is different from the others and looks like a little church itself.

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    Kaiserliche Hofburg - The Imperial Court

    by zadunajska8 Written Jan 27, 2013

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    Kaiserliche Hofburg - The Imperial Court
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    The Hofburg was the home of the Habsburg royal family in the Tirol. The history of the Hofburg goes back to the 14th century but the building has been expanded, remodeled and renovated many times during the centuries and the much of the present incarnation of the Hofburg dates from the reign of the Empress Maria Theresa in the 18th century.

    The Hofburg is home to the marginally interesting Alpine Club Museum, but the real attraction is a chance to visit the Imperial Apartments. Here you find lavishly decorated rooms befitting an Empress (although the original furniture was pinched by the Bavarians in the 19th century before they had to hand the Hofburg back to Austria following the congress of Vienna). My favourite is the Giant's Hall, thus named for the Hercules frescoes which used to decorate the room in a previous form. Now this huge space is decorated with portraits of Empress Maria Theresa's children and grandchildren.

    Another highlight is the Audience Chamber which Maria Theresa had decorated as "a room for the Lorraine Family" to honour the family of her husband Francis Stephen.

    The biggest drawback of a visit is that they have a (strictly enforced) no photography policy, which I always resent at least a little.

    Entry is free if you have an Innsbruck card and includes an audioguide.

    Google Map

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  • codrutz's Profile Photo

    Hofburg - The Imperial Palace

    by codrutz Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Grand Ballroom inside Hofburg

    The most important museum of Innsbruck is The Imperial Palace (Hofburg) - the 15th century where the provincial royalties used to live. This is a must visit palace while in Innsbruck. The interiors, formerly 25 apartments, are very impressive. I have liked especially the grand ballroom (click to enlarge the picture).

    For more inside pictures of Hofburg visit the Hofburg Pictures Travelogue

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  • silvia-m.b's Profile Photo

    Hofburg Innsbruck

    by silvia-m.b Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Hofburg inside

    In 1401 Duke Friedrich IV got the house in a barter deal.
    Towards the end of the 15th century, with Emperor Maximilian displaying the splendour of Court life in it, the building had today's size already.
    Empress Maria Theresia had it transformed in two renovation stages into a monumental residence of late baroque style.

    One of the many showrooms containing precious furniture and paintings is the giant room (Riesensaal) known as the most marvellous feast and ceremonial room in the Alps, it gives a vivid impression of a past time ruling class life!

    The decoration and furniture in most of the rooms are not of the same date of origin, but of the same style. Most pieces of furniture are of the 19th century, such as the Biedermeier pieces made by Johann Nepomuk Geyer, a carpenter of the city, or the 2nd Rokoko-style furniture by La Vigne. Still, of the items of Maria Theresian times there is almost nothing left.


    In 1990, the revitalization of the whole Imperial Residence has been started. As far as the museum section is concerned restauration works are partly focused on the entrance foyer with the Cafeteria, an elevator for disabled persons and on the other hand on further scientific investigations of interiors which are based on a well preserved "business and furniture inventory" of the year 1841.

    The "Imperial guest room" was chosen for restauration and adapted to the technical standards of a modern museum with maximal regard to preserving authentic old parts, a method the whole, long-term restauration concept for all other showrooms is based on.

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  • desert_princess's Profile Photo

    Hofburg- the imperial palace

    by desert_princess Updated Mar 6, 2011

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    Hofburg- the imperial palace

    Newly renovated , the Imperial palace in Innsbruck is definitely worth a visit. Even if it's just to admire the splendid Giant hall, scene of gala dinners, banquets and high society events and Sissi's appartments. When I went there, there were only a few visitors , so you can admire the place in tranquility, without the crowds of tourists that get on the way and the tourist guides talking in all the languages. For those interested in WWII events , there is a slideshow if photographs from different events held in the Hofburg during the Nazi occupation.

    Open whole year round
    Daily from 9.00 a.m. to 5.00 p.m.
    Entry until 4.30 p.m.

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  • Nemorino's Profile Photo

    Hofburg

    by Nemorino Updated Dec 22, 2010

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    The Hofburg at night

    The Hofburg is right across the street from the theater, and is illuminated at night. It was the seat of the Habsburg family of princes, kings and emperors for over six centuries. Since the end of the First World War, which was also the end of Habsburg rule in Austria, the Hofburg has been used as a museum.

    It is open daily from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission as of 2006 was EUR 5.45 for adults, EUR 4.00 for "seniors" aged 60 or over, EUR 3.63 for students, etc., down to EUR 1.09 for children from 6 to 14 years old.

    These odd prices probably are the result of conversion from the old prices in Austrian Shillings, which were phased out with the introduction of the Euro as the common European currency on January 1, 2002.

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  • mallyak's Profile Photo

    Hofburg (Imperial palce)

    by mallyak Written Aug 7, 2008

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    Originally built in the 15th century by Archduke Siegmund the Rich, the Imperial Palace was rebuilt in Baroque style with Rococo detail by architect Johann Martin Gumpp on the orders of Empress Maria Theresa. The building, flanked by domed towers, has four wings which house state rooms, private apartments and a chapel. Definitely worth a look is the enormous Riesensaal (Giant’s Hall) is a 30 metre long state room decorated with ceiling frescoes, adorned with portraits of the Hapsburgs and embellished with marble and gold; the courtyard is also a wonderful place to visit in the evening.

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    Hofburg of Innsbruck

    by BruceDunning Updated Aug 1, 2008

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    brochure of palace
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    Maria Theresa had the design of the palace changed last in 1755, and it was expanded into a royal palace, being completed in 1770. It previously was the the ruling family of Asburgos that had control for 100+ years. The Hapsburgs ruled from here for six centuries, through WWI. The most impressive site inside is the great hall at 90 feet and colorful frescoed ceilings, fringed by gold and marble. There are also a number of family Hapsburg portraits.
    Open daily 9:00 to 5:00PM, the cost is 5.45 Euro for normal, or 4 Euro senior

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    Riesensaal

    by Cristian_Uluru Updated Oct 7, 2007

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    Riesensaal
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    The giants' room is the most beautiful room of whole Hofburg. It was the saloon of the parties with frescos on the ceiling made by F.A. Maulbertch in 1775. These frescos represent the Triumph of the dynastic of the House of Habsburg-Lorenas. You can see To the walls the portraits of Maria Theresa of Austria, of her husband Francis I of Lorena, Joseph II and of their children.

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    Hofburg

    by Cristian_Uluru Written Sep 30, 2007

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    Hofburg
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    The Royal Residence was the residence of the Tirolean branch of the House of the Asburgos (century sixteenth). Subsequently it became Imperial Palace and used during the summer months from the Royal Family. The actual aspect in rococo style has got the facade coloured with the characteristic white and yellow plaster. This colour was given to him under the kingdom of Maria Theresa of Austria from the architect J.M.Gumpp (1754-1756) and from K.J.Walter (1766-1773). The facade of the building is constituted from three orders of windows and to the extremities there are two small towers.

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    The Hofburg of Innsbruck

    by globetrott Written May 19, 2005

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    The Hofburg of Innsbruck

    The Hofburg of Innsbruck dates back to the year 1460 and was restored and partly rebuilt in Rokkoko-style during the reign of empress Maria Theresia. You may see many of these great rooms still today, decorated with precious tapisseries, paintings and Rokkoko-stuccoworks.
    There is also a "Riesensaal" , a giant room with a length of 30 meters with paintings by von Maulpertsch dating back to 1755.
    The Hofburg is beautifully lighted during the night !
    It is open for visitors daily 09.00a.m. - 05.00p.m.

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