Jugendstil / Art Nouveau, Vienna

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Art Nouveau in Vienna

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  • Majolikahaus
    Majolikahaus
    by balhannah
  • Jugendstil / Art Nouveau
    by balhannah
  • Villa Wagner I
    Villa Wagner I
    by brazwhazz
  • balhannah's Profile Photo

    OTTO WAGNER BUILDINGS

    by balhannah Written May 28, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Majolikahaus
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    Favorite thing: Have you heard of Otto Wagner (1841 to 1918) ? I bet you have by the time you leave Vienna!
    He was a trained architect, visual artist and brick layer who shaped Vienna. Many of the residential buildings he built in the style of beautiful Art Nouveau.

    Some of them I have already written about, others I didn't see.
    His most recognized buildings are the Pavilions at Karlsplatz, the Austrian savings bank, City Railway stations, Otto Wagner Villa I/ Ernst Fuchs Villa, Majolika house, the Danube weir and many more.

    I happened to find a whole lot of his creations on residential buildings quite close to each other at Linke Wienzeile, next to Naschmarkt. It was nearly dark, so my photos are not the best.
    Majolikahaus at no 40. is a name from the Spanish tile tradition in Mallorca. The building is tiled all over with glazed red poppy tiles, so different to other art nouveau I had seen. The building houses a second hand bookshop on part of the ground floor, and residential apartments on the upper floors.
    If you like what he created, then perhaps you may want to follow the Art Nouveau Walk
    http://www.vienna-unwrapped.com/art-nouveau-walk/

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  • brazwhazz's Profile Photo

    Otto Wagner

    by brazwhazz Updated Apr 17, 2006

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Karlsplatz
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    Favorite thing: We were so fascinated by Otto Wagner's works that we ended up doing a "Wagner pilgrimage" through the streets of Vienna! Here is a list of the Wagner buildings we visited, in chronological order.

    1) Miesthaus (1877). What makes this rather classical house stand out is the the black-and-white triangles pattern that covers most of the facade of the upper floors.
    Address: Schottenring 23. Get off at Schottenring (U2 or U4).

    2) Villa Wagner I (1886-1888). This one is more classical, set in the Palladian villa style. Now the Ernst Fuchs Museum, which is open to the public.
    Address: Huttelbergstrasse 26. Get off at Hutteldorf (U4) then take bus 148 or 152.

    3) Karlsplatz subway pavilions (1898). The most popular of all Wagner's creations, the twin pavilions have been turned into a coffeehouse and a museum, respectively.
    Address: Karlsplatz. Get off at Karlsplatz (U1, U2 or U4).

    4) Majolikahaus (1898-1899). Although the building is square, the exterior decoration's floral theme clearly makes it Art Nouveau. The adjacent appartment block at Linke Wienzeile 38 was also designed by Wagner.
    Address: Linke Wienzeile 40. Get off at Kettenbruckengasse (U4).

    5) Kirche am Steinhof (1903-1907). Under renovation at the time of our visit (Sept. 2004), we only managed to see its striking golden dome and two spires.
    Address: Baumgartner Hohe 1. Get off at Volkstheater (U2 or U3) then take bus 48A all the way to the final stop, which is in front of the psychiatric hospital on whose grounds the church stands.

    6) Postsparkasse (Post Office Savings Bank) (1904-1912). Less Art Nouveau than Wagner's other buildings, it is closer to modern architecture. The huge aluminium bolts form an interesting pattern.
    Address: Georg-Coch-Platz 2. Get off at Stubentor (U3).

    7) Villa Wagner II (1912-1913). A scaled-down, more modernist villa than the first one. But since it's beside it, you may as well check it out.
    Address: Huttelbergstrasse 28. Get off at Hutteldorf (U4) then take bus 148 or 152.

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    Anker Clock ( Ankeruhr )

    by dvideira Written May 3, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    anker clock - vienna

    Favorite thing: In the course of 12 hours, 12 historical figures or pairs of figures - all representative of the history of Vienna - move across the face of the clock , among them Roman Emperor Marcus Aurelius, Joseph Haydn, , Empress Maria Theresa and Prince Eugen of Savoya. At noon, every day, all figures parade accompanied by music from the various eras.

    Ankeruhr
    1, Hoher Markt 10/11
    U1, U3: Stephansplatz
    U1, U4: Schwedenplatz

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    Anker Clock (Ankeruhr)

    by dvideira Updated May 3, 2004

    4.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    anker clock - vienna

    Favorite thing: This clock (built 1911 - 1917) was created by the painter and sculptor Franz von Matsch.
    It is situated on the oldest square of Vienna 'Hoher Markt' and represents a typical Art Nouveau design.
    It forms a bridge between two buildings of the Anker Insurance Company's.

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    Loos Haus - Michaelerplatz

    by yooperprof Updated Aug 10, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Avoiding the crime of ornamentation

    Favorite thing: "Ornament is Crime" wrote architect/designer Alfred Loos. He was reacting against the neo-Historicism of such Ringstrasse buildings as the Rathaus and Parlament - grandiose structures whose stylistic borrowings and intensive decorations struck Loos and his Jugenstil colleagues as vulgar in the extreme. "Every era merits its own art," was their plea, as embodied in Joseph Olbrich's Secession, and Otto Wagner's U-bahn stations. Emperor Franz Joseph was not at all pleased at Alfred Loos' design for this office building at Michaelerplatz, next to the Hofburg Palace. (The Emperor's apartment's were immediately opposite.) Franz Joseph is said to have decried "a building without eyebrows." The flower boxes were a minor concession to "popular taste," but Loos Haus is rightly regarded as an important step in the development of European mpdernist architecture, perhaps the equivalent of Louis Sullivan's Wainwright Building in St. Louis, MO.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Architecture

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    Sezession

    by truus_s Updated Aug 24, 2003

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Sezession

    Favorite thing: Vienna is so great ..you must go more days to see all the beautifull places..Churches ..houses ..parks..

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