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    by Oleg_D.
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    Church of the Teutonic Order.

    by Oleg_D. Updated Apr 21, 2014
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    The Order of the Teutonic Knights was purely German military religious society founded in 1190 in the Holy Land. Templars were backed by the French crown and supported they French interests in Holy land and Hospitallers were English institution. That's why Emperors of Holy Roman Empire needed their own national political and military tool in Holy Land. From the very beginning Teutonic order also known as German Order became typically Ghibellin (pro imperial) and Anti Guelph (anti papal) military and political institution. The Order came to Vienna in 1205 and the church was built between 1326 and 1375. Building of this church dedicated to Saint Elisabeth of Hungary was never fallen prey to the baroque madness that swept the city after the Counter-Reformation, so you can see it pretty much in its original form. The XVI century Flemish altarpiece standing at the main altar is richly decorated with woodcarving, gilt, and painted panel inserts. Many knights of the Teutonic Order are buried here, their heraldic shields still mounted on some of the upper walls.
    In the knights’ treasury, on the second floor of the Order’s HQ, you’ll see mementos such as seals and coins illustrating the history of the order, as well as a collection of arms, vases, gold, crystal, and precious stones. Also on display are the charter given to the Teutonic Order by Henry IV of England who took part in crusade to Lithuania and a collection of medieval paintings. A curious exhibit is the Viper Tongue Credenza, said to have the power to detect poison in food and render it harmless. So, this place is on of must see in Vienna.
    Admission is free but any donations are highly welcomed and appreciated.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos without flash and tripod.
    Church of Teutonic Order is open daily from 07:00 through 18:00 hours.
    Treasure Opened:
    Tuesday, 10:00 - 12:00
    Wednesday 15:00 - 17:00
    Thursday, 10:00 - 12:00
    Friday, 15:00 - 17:00
    Saturday, 10:00 - 12:00
    Closed on public holidays.
    Address:
    Singerstraße 7
    1010 Vienna

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    Church of the Teutonic Order. Interiors.

    by Oleg_D. Written Apr 21, 2014
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    Believe you or not but the Knights of Teutonic Order and Order itself still exist. They don’t convert heathens of Lithuania into Christianity anymore but involved in charity and benevolence. Inside of their Church of Saint Elisabeth of Hungary you will be able to see the coats of arms of all Great Masters of that order, tombs of Teutonic Knights and many other interesting masterpieces of medieval period.
    Admission is free but any donations are highly welcomed and appreciated.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos without flash and tripod.

    Church of Teutonic Order is open daily from 07:00 through 18:00 hours.
    Address:
    Singerstraße 7
    1010 Vienna

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    Church of the Teutonic Order. Tombs of the Knights

    by Oleg_D. Written Apr 20, 2014
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    There are several tombs of Teutonic Knights in the Church of Saint Elisabeth of Hungary. This church still belongs to Teutonic Order and Order is still exists. The oldest grave belongs to Jobst Truchsess von Wetzhausen (Governor of Wetzhausen) who died in 1524, then, you can see the grave slabs of other Teutonic Knights who died in XVI and late XVII century.
    Admission is free but any donations are highly welcomed and appreciated.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos without flash and tripod.
    Church of Teutonic Order is open daily from 07:00 through 18:00 hours.
    Address:
    Singerstraße 7
    1010 Vienna

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    Church of the Teutonic Order. Memorial Slab

    by Oleg_D. Written Apr 20, 2014
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    During your visit to the Church of Saint Elisabeth of Hungary belonging to Teutonic Order you will be able to see some very remarkable things. Memorial slab dedicated to one of many brothers the knights is situated on the left hand side from the entrance. That slab dedicated to Jobst Truchsess von Wetzhausen (Governor of Wetzhausen) who died in 1524. Slab made as the triptych and you can see Jobst himself kneeling in splendid full plate armor and in white habit with black cross of Teutonic knight. His combat and tournament helmets, the latter with ceremonial crest are near him. You can also see the shield with Jobst’s personal coat of arms. On the right panel you can see the skeleton with bow the reminder of perishability of human beings. This is another excellent source on the fashion, arms and armor of Teutonic Knights of first quarter of XVI century.
    Admission is free but any donations are highly welcomed and appreciated.
    Church of Teutonic Order is open daily from 07:00 through 18:00 hours.

    Address:
    Singerstraße 7
    1010 Vienna

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    Church of the Teutonic Order. High Altar

    by Oleg_D. Updated Apr 19, 2014

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    Altarpiece of High Altar in the church of Saint Elisabeth of Hungary belonging to Teutonic Knights was made in first quarter of XVI century. All characters shown there were dressed according the fashion of that time that’s why the carvings and panels of that altarpiece are the very valuable source of information to all researchers. Altarpiece shows the full story of Christ Passions.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos without flash and tripod.
    Admission is free but any donations are highly welcomed and appreciated.
    Church of Teutonic Order is open daily from 07:00 through 18:00 hours.
    Address:
    Singerstraße 7
    1010 Vienna

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    Treasury of the Teutonic Order

    by Oleg_D. Updated Apr 19, 2014

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    The Order of Teutonic Knights subdued the territory later known as East Prussia and opened the area for German colonization and, as military association of nobles, performed certain charitable functions. In 1807, Napoleon, when he set his sights on dominating the German states, abolished the order, which countered his action by moving to Vienna. Since that time, the treasure of the order has been kept in Vienna. As a result of knowledgeable collecting done by a succession of art-loving Grand Masters, its treasury now contains such items as the XV century insignia of the order with the Chain of Swords, magnificent chalices, oriental weapons, a Viper Tongue Credenza to render poisoned food harmless, and precious XVII and XVIII century tableware, china and crystal.
    Admission is 5 Euros.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos without flash and tripod.
    Opened:
    Tuesday, 10:00 - 12:00
    Wednesday 15:00 - 17:00
    Thursday, 10:00 - 12:00
    Friday, 15:00 - 17:00
    Saturday, 10:00 - 12:00
    Closed on public holidays.
    Singerstraße 7
    1010 Vienna

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    Treasury of the Teutonic Order. Part II

    by Oleg_D. Updated Apr 19, 2014
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    The treasure of the Teutonic Order in Vienna houses a large variety of precious artifacts, dating mainly from the Gothic period to the XIX century, among them liturgical and profane vessels, weapons, paintings, costumes and insignias. The collection illustrates 800 years of rich history of the once mighty and chivalric order, which today focuses its attention on pastoral affairs and charity activities.
    Admission is 5 Euros.
    Visitors are allowed to take noncommercial photos without flash and tripod.
    Singerstraße 7
    1010 Vienna
    Opened:
    Tuesday, 10:00 - 12:00
    Wednesday 15:00 - 17:00
    Thursday, 10:00 - 12:00
    Friday, 15:00 - 17:00
    Saturday, 10:00 - 12:00
    Closed on public holidays.

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    Church&Treasury of the Teutonic Order. HQ Yard

    by Oleg_D. Written Apr 19, 2014

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    The yard of the HQ of Teutonic Knights is real medieval structure from where you can see the spires of the Saint Stephen Cathedral. There are still medieval bas-reliefs on the wall reminding about the Teutonic Knights.
    For a few weeks in the year 1781, Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart was also a resident of the House of the Order of the Teutonic Knights. It was here that he was allegedly kicked by Count Arco, which led to Mozart’s resignation from the service of the Salzburg Prince-Archbishop.
    Church of Teutonic Order is open daily from 07:00 through 18:00 hours.
    Treasure Opened:
    Tuesday, 10:00 - 12:00
    Wednesday 15:00 - 17:00
    Thursday, 10:00 - 12:00
    Friday, 15:00 - 17:00
    Saturday, 10:00 - 12:00
    Closed on public holidays.
    Address:
    Singerstraße 7
    1010 Vienna

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    A Secret Garden and a Convent

    by Kathrin_E Written Jan 23, 2014

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    A glimpse from the gate
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    The convent of the Salesian nuns is located next to Lower Belvedere Palae and Park. The church with the dome probably appears in many photos but hardly anyone seems to take notice. The grounds have the flair of a somehow forgotten place that hardly sees any tourists.

    I have no idea whether I was supposed to enter the grounds or not, tee hee - I hust walked in until I reached the convent wing and inner courtyard. There seem to be accommodations for visitors inside, according to the signs. It was all quiet and deserted that day, though. The church was unfortunately closed.

    The front garden appears neglected, taken care of by the Lord alone - it should be beautiful in summer when everything is growing and blooming. I admit that I like such "wild", mystic gardens!

    Location: Rennweg, next to Lower Belvedere

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    Reformierte Stadtkirche

    by Kathrin_E Written Jan 23, 2014

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    A hidden gem among the many churches in Vienna’s inner city is the Calvinist parish church in Dorotheergasse. Vienna, and Austria in general, has been strictly Roman Catholic until Emperor Joseph II issued his declaration of tolerance in 1781. Only then the small protestant communities in the capital were allowed to have their own churches. The grounds of a closed-down convent were divided between Lutherans and Calvinists. While the Lutherans received the existing old convent church, the Calvinists built a new one next to it, which was completed in 1784. The neobaroque façade is an addition of the later 19th century.

    The result of this building project is a church interior of moderate size but finest neoclassical style. Two domes with painted cassettes cover the main nave. Also the other ornaments and details are mostly painted, just a few are done in stucco. The hall leads towards the majestic pulpit at the end, made from marble, probably not real but stucco marble methinks. Doric columns carry the galleries on the sides. Since the Calvinists do not allow images, biblical verses in gilded letters are used as ornaments, just like the façade these are a 19th century addition as the ‘gothic’ script indicates.

    Originally the entrance to the church was from the inner courtyard only. However, in 1815 the parish community gained a very prominent member, Archduchess Henriette, née Nassau-Weilburg, who married Archduke Karl but kept her Calvinist faith. For her, and for no one else to use, the portal and passage from the street were installed in a corner of the doorless façade which are now the main entrance.

    During the conference I attended we had one evening lecture in this church - that's when I took the photos, so the people running around the church are participants of the conference. Sorry I cannot tell whether this architectural gem has regular opening hours during the day!

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    Visit Stefansdom, obviously...... but.....

    by leics Written Nov 18, 2012
    Little faces everywhere!
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    .....do take the time to walk fully around its exterior, and to have a good look at the main entrance (avoiding the tour touts as you do so).

    The interior of the cathedral is fairly appealing but it was the Medieval carvings on the main entrance, and the gargoyles on the exterior, which really caught my interest.

    The main entrance is...I believe...part of the original cathedral building (i.e. 1368-1433). It's called the Reisentor (Giant's Door) because, in the past, the fossilised thighbone of a mastodon hung over it for many years. But I liked it because of its typical early Medieval carvings. Look above the doorway itself and inside the porch for the various fantastic and symbolic creatures, the intricately-detailed column carving and the strange faces which peep out through the stone 'foliage'.

    Then walk round the cathedral exterior, looking at the gargoyles: there are some wonderful Medieval ones. You can also see very clearly the blackening caused to the stonework by centuries of smoke.

    At the rear of the cathedral I found a display of religious ?frescoes? ?paintings?, protected by perspex and roofed over to keep them from the weather. I couldn't find out what they were, or where they had come from, but they are clearly pretty old. They're worth looking for as well.

    Even if you don't bother to go inside, or can't, a walk around the cathedral is not to be missed (assuming you have any interest in history or architecture).

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    The Greek Orthodox Church

    by globetrott Updated Aug 10, 2012

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    inside the Greek Orthodox Church
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    The Greek Orthodox Church is one of the most ornate churches in Vienna, it is not really well known by the tourists and it is also most of the time locked and you can see it just from outside or its entrance-hall, that is also worth seeing, but less beautiful than the church.
    You will find this church next to "Griechenbeisl", (which is one of the oldest restaurants in Vienna).
    The Greek Orthodox church is in Fleischmarkt, a side-street of Rothenturmstrasse, when you walk from Stephansdom to Schwedenplatz.

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    Jesuitenkirche

    by globetrott Updated Aug 10, 2012

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    inside Jesuitenkirche
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    Jesuitenkirche is in a part of Vienna that most of the tourists will pass by, although it is in the very centre of Vienna, just about 300 meters from St. Stephansdom. All of this church is so beautifully decorated with many side-altars, and each of them differs in color and design. When you click on my pictures, you will see that the columns are made of marble in different colors and also the design of the columns differs from one side-altar to the other.
    You may visit Jesuitenkirche freely and without restrictions during the day !
    Dr. Ignatz-Seipel-Platz is the adress of Jesuitenkirche
    Simply walk from Rothenturmstrasse through Baeckergasse in order to get there !

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    Jesuitenkirche

    by globetrott Updated Aug 9, 2012

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    Jesuitenkirche
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    Jesuitenkirche was built by the italian architect Andrea Pozzo, who made also the great frescos at the ceiling of the church. That ceiling gives you the impression of seeing domes and other architecture, that does not exist in reality. The baroque church dates back to 1703 and it is totally over-loaded with great golden ornaments and precious marble. On both sides each of the side-altars have 2 solid columns made of colored marble and each of them has also a different design - see my 1st picture.
    Also the organ looks really beautiful and includes a clock !
    --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- --- ---
    You can enter Jesuitenkirche freely and without restrictions
    daily between 07.00a.m. and 06.30p.m.
    The church is in Dr-Ignaz-Seipel-Platz, next to Akademie der Wissenschaften,
    about 500 meters from Lugeck & Rothenturmstrasse.
    Next U-bahn-stations are Stephansplatz & Schwedenplatz.

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    climb up St.Stephens / Stephansdom

    by globetrott Updated Aug 9, 2012

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    Stephansdom / St.Stephen cathedral
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    climb up the small spiral staircase of St. Stepens Cathedral - the stairs are just 80 cm wide and are the same for up & down Unfortunately the spire is under repair at the moment and so the view is a bit restricted at some places. I made a red dot on the pic, in order to show, how high the " Turmstube " - the small " room with a view " is situated.
    The " Room with a view " offers a souvenirshop and 4 large windows to look out and this room was used for various purposes in the past :
    It was a watch-tower in order to see enemies approaching Vienna
    and until 1950 it also was used to watch out day and night for fire anywhere in Vienna
    NO RESTROOMS up there !!!

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