Akademie der bildenden Kunste Gemaldegalerie - Academy of Fine Arts, Vienna

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  • Gallery of Fine Arts
    Gallery of Fine Arts
    by balhannah
  • Gallery of Fine Arts
    Gallery of Fine Arts
    by balhannah
  • Gallery of Fine Arts
    Gallery of Fine Arts
    by balhannah
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    ACADEMY OF FINE ARTS

    by balhannah Written May 14, 2014

    2.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    Gallery of Fine Arts
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    Just a few steps away from the Secession gallery, I found this lovely building - The Academy of Fine Arts.
    I didn't want to go inside, but did stop and admire the Neo Renaissance façade. There was a lot detailed work on the exterior and many statues. I really liked the columns, the smaller decorations including flying horses. Evidently, inside the building are ceiling frescoes.

    Inside of course, is Art. The Academy of Fine Arts was founded in 1692, as a public art school of higher education.

    DID YOU KNOW ALDOLF HITLER WANTED TO BECOME AN ARTIST?

    Hitler put all his hope in the dream of achieving greatness as an artist.
    In October 1907, at 18 years of age, he withdrew his inheritance money from the bank and went to live and study in Vienna.
    He took the two day entrance exam for the academy's school of painting and FAILED!

    ACADEMY OPEN
    Tuesday to Sunday, Holidays
    10 - 6PM
    Admission till a quarter of an hour before closing time.

    ENTRANCE FEE
    Regular 8 €
    Reduced 5 €:
    Students with ID up to 27 years Seniors aged 60 years
    People with disabilities, including accompanying person

    Other individual discounts
    Online Ticket € 7
    Vienna Card owners € 7

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    The gallery of paintings of the Academy.

    by breughel Updated Jun 28, 2013

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    The gallery of paintings of the Academy of the Fine arts of Vienna is essentially visited for its famous altar triptych of the "Last Judgment" by Hieronymus (Jerome) Bosch.
    This work of 1504 belonged to the archduke Leopold of Austria and became part of the collection of the count Lamberg, founder of this museum.
    The wings of the triptych open to reveal, from left to right, "Original Sin", "The Last Judgment" and "Hell".
    Bosch’s pictures have always fascinated viewers; Philip II, king of Spain, collected his works. If in his time Bosch was regarded as the inventor of monsters and chimeras, today his paintings still hold as an intriguing attraction reflecting mysterious practices of the Middle Ages.
    Jerome Bosch seems a rising star in the world of the fans of the esotericism, the mysteries and the sects.
    Really, there is nothing esoteric in the gallery of the paintings of the Academy of Vienna.
    This museum is - still - very quiet and has few visitors. It is a pity because it contains a number of other masterpieces.
    In front of the Bosch triptych is a magnificent painting of Dieric Bouts "The Coronation of the Virgin".
    The museum also has beautiful sections of paintings of the German school with Cranach, the Italians, the Flemish baroque with Rubens and a collection of Dutch painters with a magnificent Pieter de Hooch "Family picture in a courtyard in Delft" and a portrait by Rembrandt.
    The amateurs of Venice will find eight views "veduti" by Guardi.

    Open 10 to 18 h. Closed on Monday.
    Entry (2013) 8 € , reduced 5 €.

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    Academy of Fine Arts and Secession Hall

    by Jefie Updated Jan 1, 2013

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    Secession Hall in Vienna, Austria
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    It is no coincidence that these two buildings are located so close to one another since one was built in reaction to the other. The Viennese Academy of Fine Arts was founded in 1692, and the beautiful Italian Renaissance-style building in which it is housed was completed in 1876. Famous graduates include Egon Schiele and Otto Wagner, but perhaps the academy is even more famous for refusing admission to Adolf Hitler when he applied in 1907 and 1908. Hitler had come to Vienna in 1905, harbouring dreams of becoming an artist. However, after looking at his work, the academy deemed he wasn't talented enough to become a painter. Of course, one will always wonder if the course of history might have been changed had he been given the opportunity to focus on his artistic aspirations...

    Across the street from the academy you'll find the Secession Hall. Designed by Joseph Maria Olbrich and built in 1897, both its location and unusual style were meant to express the Secessionists' desire to separate themselves from the constraints imposed by the more traditional art form taught at the academy. The inscription above the main entrance translates as "To every age its art, to art its freedom". The hall was used to showcase the work of artists belonging to this new movement, including Gustav Klimt whose "Beethoven Friese" is still one of the most popular exhibits. Today, Secession Hall remains a modern art gallery featuring the works of contemporary artists.

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  • breughel's Profile Photo

    Misplaced reviews and photos.

    by breughel Updated Jun 30, 2012

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    After writing a review hereunder about "things to do" N° 54 called AKADEMIE DER BILDENDEN KUNSTE GEMALDEGALERIE - ACADEMY OF FINE ARTS
    I was surprised to find photos and text by other VTers showing or describing the
    ART HISTORY MUSEUM - KUNSTHISTORISCHES "things to do" N° 47 called KHM-KUNSTHISTORICHES MUSEUM and located Maria-Theresienplatz.

    The "Akademie Der Bildenden Kunste Gemäldegalerie" - Academy of Fine Arts showing the famous Bosch' triptych is located Schillerplatz 3, 1010 Wien.

    I suppose that this confusion is due to the fact that since begin 2011 "Travel Editors" (formerly Tip Group Editors) have no access anymore to the "grouping function" so that they can not move misplaced reviews to the correct "Things to do" item.

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  • breughel's Profile Photo

    Akademie der bildenden Künste - Gemäldegalerie.

    by breughel Updated Apr 9, 2011

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    P. de Hooch

    This long tip was written in French and separately in English at a time where VT limited the number of characters.

    La galerie des peintures de l'Académie des Beaux-Arts de Vienne se visite essentiellement pour son célèbre triptyque du "Jugement dernier " par Jérôme (Hieronymus) Bosch.
    Cette œuvre de 1504 appartenait à l'archiduc Léopold d'Autriche et est ensuite passé à la collection du comte Lamberg fondateur de ce musée.
    Sur le panneau de gauche, une représentation du paradis, et sur celui de droite, celle de l'enfer. Au dessus du panneau central, domine le Christ entouré d'anges et de saints : il juge ce qu'ont été les actions des hommes représentés en dessous.
    Toutes les perversités, et toutes les horreurs sont figurées grâce à l'inventivité du peintre pour traduire par la multiplicité et par les détails les atrocités qui mêlent les scènes humaines et animales.
    Aujourd'hui le penchant pour l'ésotérisme à la façon "Da Vinci Code" entraîne un regain d'intérêt pour Jérôme Bosch qui exprime la hantise de l'enfer, et les travers humains dans une oeuvre habitée de symboles, de mystères et de monstres.
    Jérôme Bosch semble une étoile montante dans le monde des fans de l'ésotérisme, des mystères et des sectes. Quant à l'appartenance de Bosch à des associations secrètes, les rumeurs les plus diverses courent à ce propos depuis le XVIe siècle mais rien n'a été prouvé.

    Quoiqu'il en soit, il n'y a rien d'ésotérique à la galerie des peintures de l'Académie de Vienne. Ce musée est - encore - très calme et peu visité.
    C'est dommage parce qu'il comporte bon nombre d'autres chefs-d'œuvre.
    En face du Bosch se trouve un magnifique tableau de Dieric Bouts "Le Couronnement de Marie".
    Le musée comporte encore de belles sections de peinture de l'école Allemande avec des Cranach, des Italiens, des Flamands baroques dont Rubens et une collection de peintres Hollandais avec un magnifique Pieter de Hooch "Tableau de famille dans une cour à Delft" et un portrait de femme par Rembrandt. Le comte Lamberg a également réuni huit vues de Venise par Guardi.

    Ouvert de 10 à 18 h. Fermé le lundi.
    Entrée 7 €,
    Prix réduit pour seniors, etc. 4 €

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  • alancollins's Profile Photo

    The Museum of Fine Arts

    by alancollins Updated Feb 25, 2010

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    The Museum of Fine Art
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    The Museum of Fine Arts, was built from 1872 to 1891 from designs by Gottfried Semper and Karl von Hasenauer. It was built close to the Imperial Palace to house their extensive art collection. It ranks among the richest and most important art collections in the world. It contains the largest Bruegal collection in the world and works by Raphael, Vermeer, Velazquez, Rubens, Rembrandt, Durer, Titian and Tintoretto. The museum also houses a fine collection of ancient Egyptian and Greek art.

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    The Museum of fine arts

    by desert_princess Updated Dec 16, 2005

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    The Museum of fine arts and National history

    Their green domes can be seen from the Palace of justice - you just need to cross the city garden to get there.
    The Museum of fine arts and the Museum of national history stand face to face are separated by the Maria-Theresia square with the statue of the emperess in the middle guarded by her horse mounted guards from all four corners.

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  • Academy of Fine Arts

    by KituAdventures Written Jan 8, 2005

    I know, there is a lot of fine art to see in Vienna, and if you're on a shorter trip the Kunthistoreiches Museum, Secession Building, Belvedere and Albertinium ought to cover you. But if you're spreading your art over a longer time period, this collection in the city's school of fine arts is a wonderful surprise.

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    Museum of Fine Arts/ Museum of Natural History

    by Polly74 Written Aug 26, 2004

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    Museum of Fine Arts

    The Museum of Fine Arts and the Museum of Natural History are two symmetric buildings that sit one in front of the other.
    The Fine Arts Museum has a vast collection of Fine Arts, from Ancient Egypt works to Rubens, Rembrant, Titian and Raphael.
    The Natural history museum has a collection of meteorites, fossils, insects and skeletons of pre-historic animals.

    Both Museums were built by Gottfried Semperand and Karl von Hasenauer.
    The construction of these buildings began in 1872, the first was completed in 1881 and the second in 1891.

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    Fine arts museum

    by William1982 Written Aug 13, 2004
    Fine arts museum

    The fine arts museum houses many fine art collections, situated in its 91 exhibition rooms. These collections come from all over Austria and other countries (some were collected from parts of the old Habsburg empire). Paintings include Samson and Delilah (van Dyck), the Tower of Babel (Breughel), Diana and Calixtus (Titian) amonst others. There are also fine sculpture collections and other arts. Even if this is not for you the architecture is worth seeing, a trip into the Ringstrasse shows the best that Vienna has to offer.

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  • mvtouring's Profile Photo

    Museum of Fine Art

    by mvtouring Written Apr 4, 2004

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    Museum of natural History and Museum of Fine Arts are mirror images, placed facing one another on the outside periphery of the Ring. You need a full day to visit these two museums, which is totally breath taking. I think you will find more Egyptian treasures here than in Egypt itself. There collection is enormous. In the Fine Arts museum you will find beautiful works of Rubens, Rembrandt, Van Dyck, Titian, Velazques and Raphael but to mention a few.

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    Akademie der bildenden Kunste - Gemäldegalerie

    by yooperprof Written Aug 7, 2003

    3.5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    ars longa, vita breva

    This is the small but choice Gallery of the Academy of Fine Arts, a collection just off the Ringstrasse and not far from the Kunsthistorische Museum. There are some fine paintings here: a touching Murillo, an early Rembrandt, several brilliant works by Rubens. But the "star" of the Akademie is the famous Last Judgement by Hieronymus Bosch, the only Bosch triptych outside of Spain. It makes the Fine Arts Academy a must for any art enthusiast. The Academy is still a functioning teaching school, so you can also see the latest contemporary art while you're here. (This is the art institute which rejected the young Adolf Hitler - twice.)

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  • rkopriva's Profile Photo

    The Museum of Fine Arts and...

    by rkopriva Written Aug 25, 2002

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    The Museum of Fine Arts and the Museum of Natural History are two symmetric buildings that sit one in front of the otherwith a nice and small park between them.
    The Fine Arts Museum has a vast collection of Fine Arts, from Ancient Egypt works to Rubens, Rembrant, Titian and Raphael. The Natural history museum has a collection of meteorites, fossils, insects and skeletons of pre-historic animals. Both are really worth seeing but certainly not a must-see.
    However the buildings themselves completed in 1881 and 1891 are definitely a must to see.

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