Heeresgeschichtliches Museum Wien -Museum of Military History, Vienna

4.5 out of 5 stars 17 Reviews

Arsenal Objekt 1, 1030 Wien +43 1 795610

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  • Heeresgeschichtliches Museum Wien -Museum of Military History
    by croisbeauty
  • Heeresgeschichtliches Museum Wien -Museum of Military History
    by croisbeauty
  • Heeresgeschichtliches Museum Wien -Museum of Military History
    by croisbeauty
  • breughel's Profile Photo

    Practical info for the Museum of Military History.

    by breughel Updated Mar 15, 2015

    5 out of 5 starsHelpfulness

    The "Heeresgeschichtliches Museum" is located outside the Centrum of Vienna at the Arsenal, Objekt 1 that is about 1 Km south of the Belvedere Palace-Museum. Unfortunately there is no public transport stop at the museum what may explain that there are not many visitors among the tourists.

    "Heer" means Army (Land Forces) in German and Geschichte = history but the HGM is more than just a military museum showing weapons. It is quite interesting for the visitor who wants to learn something about the history of Austria over the last four centuries.

    The visit starts with the upper floor with the terrible Thirty Years' War (1618–1648); the war against the Ottomans with the relief battle of Vienna in 1683 and Prince Eugene of Savoy.
    Follow the reigns of Emperor Karl VI., Maria Theresa and Joseph II in the 18th c. c. and the wars against France called the Napoleonic Wars.
    Then going down to the ground floor we arrive at Emperor and King (Kaiser und Köning or K & K) Franz Joseph I of the multi-ethnic state Austria-Hungary and the husband of the well known Sisi.

    Much more important for Europe than Sisi was the assassination in Sarajevo in 1914 of his nephew Franz Ferdinand leading to World War I and its 15 million deaths!
    Three objects dominate this hall: The automobile, in which the heir to the throne Francis Ferdinand and his spouse were shot to death, the blood-soaked uniform jacket of the Archiduke, and the chaise longue on which he died.
    It is the paradox of the touristic Vienna: a lot of fuss and visitors for Sisi at the Hofburg and so few visitors for the Sarajevo room at the HGM! See my review: Start of WW I
    Two halls are dedicated to WW I and are followed by one hall dedicated to the Anschluss of Austria by Nazi Germany and WW II.
    Outside there is a tank collection (have you ever seen the famous Soviet T34?) See my reviewTanks exhibition
    and an important gun collection.

    The architecture of the museum is interesting with the much decorated hall and staircase.

    Open: Every day from 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
    Closing days: 1 January, Easter Sunday, 1 May, 1 November, 25 and 31 December

    Admission fees:
    Regular Fee (2015): € 6
    Reduced Fee: € 4 Students, handicapped persons, Senior Citizens
    Free admission on each first Sunday of the month.
    Visitors until the age of nineteen have free admission.
    Photo-Permission: € 2 (I never paid!).

    To get there take the Underground/subway U1 to Station Südtirolerplatz. There is a bus the 69A that stops at 300 m (Arsenal stop) of the HGM. There are also tram lines 18, D, O on the Gürtel at 400 m of the museum. Don't forget your umbrella if it rains because the walk is on open ground.

    At the building called Arsenal Objekt 1 on the Ghegastrasse there is a bar-restaurant on the right of the portico. Not bad.

    HGM hall. Musketiers around 1620.
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    Heeresgeschichtliches Museum Military Museum

    by breughel Updated Mar 15, 2015

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    The Heeresgeschichtliches Museum draws the military history of Austria from the 16th in to the 20th century. The visit starts on the 1st floor with the wars against the Turks who besieged Vienna in 1529 and in 1683. Prince Eugene of Savoy was the victorious defender of Austria.
    The Turks left in Vienna 500 bags of coffee what made of the Viennese the first Europeans to sip a cup of coffee.
    Then follow the wars against the French, against the Prussians, the Napoleonic wars. Sparkling uniforms and displays of weapons fill the showcases.
    We now arrive at the double monarchy Austria-Hungary illustrated by the monogram K&K (Kaiser und König) from the emperor Franz Joseph and to the room dedicated to the assassination plot of Sarajevo in June 1914.

    In this room is exposed the car with a hole in the body at the level of the right back seat, and the uniform of the Archduke, the jacket of which kept traces of blood. Franz-Ferdinand died from a bleeding caused by the second bullet which touched the neck. His wife was killed immediately by the first bullet.
    We so enter the tragedy of the First World War and its 15 million deaths. WW I is abundantly illustrated by weapons, equipments and documents. The dismemberment of the empire and the end of Habsburg followed the end of the war.
    A republic is born, but in 1938 it is the Anschluss with Germany and the Second World War illustrated with arms, equipment, uniforms and documents.
    The museum also contains a section, dedicated to the Austrian navy. An enormous model of a battleship is shown. Outside are some tanks of WW2.

    The start of WW I and its 15 million deaths! HGMuseum - Artillery 1914-18 HGMuseum - German airplane 14-18 HGMuseum - Russian  T34 WW I Heavy howitzer.
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    Sarajevo assassination and start of WW I.

    by breughel Updated Jan 29, 2015

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    If you search for this museum located outside the Centrum of Vienna at the Arsenal, about 1 Km south of the Belvedere Palace-Museum, you better use the local name "Heeresgeschichtliches Museum" or just "Arsenal". Unfortunately there is no public transport stop at the museum what may explain that there are not many tourists.

    "Heer" means Army (Land Forces) in German and Geschichte = history but the HGM is more than just a military museum showing weapons. It is quite interesting for the visitor who wants to learn something about the history of Austria over the last four centuries.

    The visit starts with the upper floor with the terrible Thirty Years' War (1618–1648), the war against the Ottomans with the relief battle of Vienna in 1683 and Prince Eugene of Savoy.
    Follow the reigns of Emperor Karl VI., Maria Theresa and Joseph II in the 18th c. c. and the wars against France called the Napoleonic Wars.
    Then going down to the ground floor we arrive at Emperor and King (Kaiser und Köning or K & K) Franz Joseph I of the multi-ethnic state Austria-Hungary and the husband of the well known Sisi.

    Much more important for Europe than Sisi was the assassination in Sarajevo in 1914 of his nephew Franz Ferdinand leading to World War I and its 15 million deaths!
    Three objects dominate this hall: The automobile, in which the heir to the throne Francis Ferdinand and his spouse were shot to death, the blood-soaked uniform jacket of the Archduke, and the chaise longue on which he died.
    It is the paradox of the touristic Vienna: a lot of fuss and visitors for Sisi at the Hofburg and so few visitors for the Sarajevo room at the HGM.
    Two halls are dedicated to WW I and are followed by one hall dedicated to the Anschluss of Austria by Nazi Germany and WW II.
    Outside there is a tank collection (have you ever seen the famous Soviet T34?) and an important gun collection.

    The architecture of the museum is interesting with the much decorated hall and staircase.

    To get there take the Underground/subway U1 to Station Südtirolerplatz. There is a bus the 69A that stops at 300 m (Arsenal stop) of the HGM. There are also tram lines 18, D, O on the Gürtel at 400 m of the museum. Don't forget your umbrella if it rains.

    The automobile of the Sarajevo assassination. Soviet T34 -best tank of WW II ? Heavy howitzer from WW I Hall of the museum. Uniforms - Austria empire.
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    Rossauer Kaserne

    by croisbeauty Updated Oct 4, 2013

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    Like the Arsenal, Rossauer Kaserne (Rossauer Barracks) was built following the revolts of 1848 to protect the inner city from the workers who lived in the suburbs. The revolution of 1848 took place in the whole of Habsburg Empire and had a nationalist character.
    This very huge and monumental red-brick building was built as the Crown Prince Rudolf Barracks and in its heyday it could quarter 2.400 soldiers and nearly 400 horses. It was built from 1854-1857.
    Today the Rossauer Kaserne is the seat of the Ministry of National Defense and Sports.

    Rossauer Kaserne

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  • breughel's Profile Photo

    "Kriege gehöre ins Museum."

    by breughel Written Jun 14, 2012

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    At the entrance of the Heeresgeschitliches Museum ("Heer" means Army (Land Forces) in German) you will read: "Kriege gehöre ins Museum." = Wars belong in(side) museum. That is a very wise conclusion for a museum showing four centuries of war involving Austria.

    On my (third) visit to the HGM, during the first week-end of June 2012, the museum was free and there was an exhibition outside "Auf Rädern und Ketten" of armored vehicles from various origins and belonging to veteran associations, army units and even private collections.

    A shock for me was to discover peacefully exposed next to each other a M47 Patton tank which equipped many of the NATO countries in the 1960s and a Soviet T55 tank which equipped our enemy of the Cold War time.
    A small country like Belgium had 784 (!) of these heavy Patton M47 tanks (46 tons) with a 90 mm gun. They equipped our armored brigades stationed in Germany in the area Aachen, Köln, Soest, Siegen, and Kassel to the East-German (DDR) border
    On the other side of the "Iron Curtain" they produced about 90.000 tanks of the T54/55 type (36 ton) with a 100 mm gun.
    I'm glad that during my military service in Germany we never met the T54/55 in the field.
    "Tanks gehöre ins Museum"!

    I want to add something nasty about the Belgian tankists of my brigade. Our armored battalions were formerly Cavalry units called Guides, Lanciers, Chasseurs à Cheval. The officers of the Guides, even in the 1960s, were often noblemen very proud of their cavalry traditions and considered the infantry to which I belonged as "pousse cailloux - pushing stones" even elite regiments like the Carabiniers Cyclistes (the "Black Devils" of the battle of Halen in 1914 against the German Cavalry) who served as armored infantry battalions of the Belgian armored brigades.
    I got never invited to enter a Patton tank or better have a drink at the Guides or Lancers officers mess. The funny thing is that we got invited to their mess by a German Panzer-Grenadier battalion.
    Cyclists and Guides don't exist anymore but like elephants I remember all bad and good things.

    Patton M47 tank at HGM. Sovietic T55 tank at HGM.
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    Military History Museum

    by MichaelFalk1969 Updated Jun 30, 2011

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    This is an often-overlooked but very interesting museum for any history buff: It features arms, armour and weaponry from the Middle Ages till today. Especially worthwhile: The collection from the Turkish Wars, culminating in the 1683 siege of Vienna, and the exhibtion around the one and only sea battle Austria ever waged when it still had access to the Adriatic Sea, the battle of Lissa.

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  • breughel's Profile Photo

    Heeresgeschichtliches Museum Histoire militaire.

    by breughel Updated Apr 9, 2011

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    This long tip was written in French and separately in English at a time where VT limited the number of characters.

    Le Heeresgeschichtliches Museum retrace l'histoire militaire de l'Autriche du XVIe au XX siècle.
    Les salles consacrées aux guerres contre les Turcs qui firent le siège de Vienne en 1529 et en1683 mettent en avant le Prince Eugène de Savoie, pourfendeur des Turcs.
    Les Turcs laissèrent comme souvenir à Vienne 500 sacs de café... ce qui vaut aux Viennois d'être les premiers Européens à siroter une tasse de café.
    Guerres contres les Français, contre les Prussiens, guerres Napoléoniennes (dans des salles réaménagées), Rutilants uniformes et panoplies d'armes remplissent les vitrines d'exposition.
    Nous arrivons ainsi à la double monarchie Autriche-Hongrie illustré par le monogramme K&K (Kaiser und König) de l'empereur François Joseph et à la salle consacrée à l'attentat de Sarajevo en juin 1914.
    Dans cette salle est exposé la voiture décapotable avec un trou dans la carrosserie à hauteur du siège arrière droit, et l'uniforme de l'Archiduc dont la veste garde des traces de sang. Franz-Ferdinand décéda d'une hémorragie causée par la seconde balle qui a touché le cou. Son épouse fut tuée sur le coup par la première balle.
    L'accès à la blessure par le médecin fut retardé du fait que l'archiduc avait l'habitude, lors de ses apparitions publiques, de faire coudre sa veste d'uniforme sur lui afin d'éviter tout faux pli. Il est possible que cette coquetterie lui a coûté la vie.
    On entre ainsi dans la tragédie de la première guerre mondiale abondamment illustrée par armes, matériels et documents.
    Avec la fin de cette guerre c'est le démembrement de l'empire et la fin des Habsbourg.
    Naît la république, mais en 1938 c'est l'Anschluss avec l'Allemagne qui nous conduit aux salles de la seconde guerre mondiale abondamment documentées en matériel, uniformes et documents.
    Le musée comporte aussi une section, consacrée à la marine où il faut absolument voir une énorme maquette d'un cuirassé. A l'extérieur se trouvent quelques chars de la seconde guère mondiale.

    HGMuseum - uniformes rutilants HGMuseum - Attentat de Sarajevo HGMuseum - chars russes
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  • Military History Museum

    by MishyM Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    The Military History museum seems to be one of Vienna's lesser knows attractions, but it really is extremely interesting and worth the visit, as well as being Vienna?s oldest museum!

    There are exhibitions from the Thirty years war where you can see suits of armour and weapons, and a room for Prince Eugene of Savoy, another with relics from the French wars and 1st World War to name but a few!

    Opening times:
    Daily except Friday
    9 a.m.-5 p.m.

    Prices:
    Adults: 5,10 Euros
    Students, pensioners, handicapped people: 3,30 Euros
    Free for children up to the age of 10

    This is a great place to learn more about the military history of Vienna, and to see some very interesting weapons, paintings and flags, amongst other things!

    The Military History Museum in Winter
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    Heeresgeschichtliches (Military History) Museum

    by Peterodl Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Built from 1850 to 1856, the Museum of Military History is also the oldest museum in Vienna.
    It traces the history of the Hapsburg Empire from the end of the 16th century, up to the dissolution of the empire after WWI in 1918 and through the Nazi period until 1945.

    The museum is filled with war materials such as guns, uniforms, posters, equipment, helmets, tanks, the conning tower of a U-Boat, and the uniform that Archduke Franz Ferdinand wore when he was assasinated, complete with shrapnel holes and dried blood stains, in Serijevo, sparking WWI. The car the Archduke rode in that day is also on display.

    To take pictures, you need to purchase a 1.50 euro photo pass to show the guards when asked. This can be bought at the front desk when you buy your ticket.

    The museum is definitly worth the admission. If you are a history buff or if history holds an interest in your life, go see the collection.

    Military History Museum Archduke Franz Ferdinand's uniform Upper floor of the Military History Museum
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    The shaping of History

    by ray_d Updated Apr 4, 2011

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    Heeresgeschichtliches Museum (Militarily History Museum)

    I spent 6 hours and I must return again.

    History fascinates me. War may not be pretty but that and Politics has shaped civilization.

    A suggestion to people who only recognise popular written history: Large wars have been started by small incidents and situations created in countries that were lost in the big picture of a world-wide conflicts.

    Austria's history has shaped the history of Europe for centuries and should be of interest to the dedicated.

    Halls of History
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  • BillNJ's Profile Photo

    Tour the Museum of Austrian Military History

    by BillNJ Updated Nov 27, 2010

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    The Heeresgeschichtliches Museum is a military museum located in the center of the Vienna Arsenal in Landstraße (Vienna's 3rd district). The Vienna Arsenal was constructed between 1850 and 1856 at the behest of Emperor Franz Joseph I to be the new city garrison, after the old one was destroyed in the 1848 revolution. The museum, at the Arsenal's center, was part of the original design -- and was to serve as both a historical museum and a shrine to the Empire's military victories and leaders.

    The museum focuses on Austrian military history from the 16th century to 1945 -- and contains one of the world's largest collections of bronze cannons. For me, the most memorable exhibit is the actual car that the Archduke Franz Ferdinand and his wife were in when they were assassinated in Sarajevo on 28 June 1914.

    I found this museum to be very interesting -- and I highly recommend it to anyone with an interest in history. The museum is a little difficult to find. I reached it by taking a tram to the nearby Belvedere Castle -- and walking a few blocks to the entrance. Another (perhaps easier) way to go is to take public transportation to the Südbahnhof (Vienna's Southern Station). The museum is an easy walk from the Südbahnhof.

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    The world’s most significant motor car?

    by tiabunna Updated Aug 16, 2007

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    If you ask the average motoring enthusiast to name the world’s most significant motor car, you’ll get a range of answers. They may mention Formula 1 or Indy racing cars; possibly something like the first petrol engined Mercedes cars; or the Model T which introduced production line assembly and brought prices to affordable levels for the masses. A few years ago, I’d have given similar answers – but the more I read of history, the more I am convinced that this is by far the most significant car in the world.

    There’s nothing special about it mechanically, it’s just a four cylinder Graf und Stift, produced in Austria in 1913, with a very conventional set of mechanical specifications. The paint job is nothing special, just a rather dull greyish colour, and the make itself is almost unknown outside Austria. So the significance?

    On 28 June 1914 Archduke Franz Ferdinand, the heir to the Austrian throne and his wife Sophie, the Duchess of Hohenberg, were assassinated in this very car while visiting Sarajevo. The main photo is a section of my full photo of it (photo2) as it is displayed in the Military Museum in a special room with paintings of the royal couple. You can still see a bullet hole in the side rear of the bodywork (photo3) and, for those with ghoulish leanings, the room also contains the couch on which the Archduke died and his bloodstained jacket.

    This is not normally the stuff for VT tips, but the historical significance of this car goes far beyond two assassinations: most of the global unpleasantness of the 20th century can be linked back to the avalanche of events cascading from the passing of this car on that fateful June day! I found myself wondering if the assassin would have pulled the trigger, had he known what he was starting? Yes, I’m glad I went to see it, but my skin still creeps at the feeling I had while in that room in the Heeresgeschichtliches Museum

    The most significant motor car? The Graf & Stift in the View of Graf & Stift, showing bullet hole.
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    Heeresgeschichtliches Museum

    by tiabunna Written Aug 15, 2007

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    I’m sorry, this is another German name I couldn’t possibly pronounce, but in English this is the Museum of Military History. Opened by Emperor Franz Josef 1 in 1856, this is the oldest of Vienna’s museums and is located in the huge building complex comprising the Arsenal, in a very substantial and quite stylish fortress-castle type building (main photo). Although we found our way to the Arsenal area without difficulty on the bus, we somehow missed our stop and took some time to find our way (with the aid of passers-by) to the fairly well-concealed entrance to the Museum (this involves going through an arched gate in the outer walls, then crossing a courtyard into the “inner sanctum” through yet another arched gate (photo 2)in another substantial wall). All that was missing was the need for a password!

    We were among the few visitors, apart from some school groups, and found they also give “Seniors Discount” for entry – but when I pulled out a camera, we also found that there is a charge of 1.50€ for a “photography pass”! The entry hall is quite impressive, in a slightly heavy vaulted style, with statues of former Austrian Generals. Through the display areas are some interesting and unusual exhibits, relating to military exploits from the 1600s to the present. I was intrigued by this display of World War 1 mountain troop equipment (photo 3) and also by the paintings (photo 4) made to record significant events, parades etc in the days before colour photography. There even was a section on the former Austro-Hungarian Navy and its batttleships and submarines! It wasn’t by any means “blood, guts and glory” as these places can too easily become – as shown in photo 5, there also was acknowledgement of past mistakes. This place certainly seemed to be off the main tourist circuit, but is well deserving of at least half a day’s visit.

    Open daily except Fridays, 0900-1700.

    First, through that arch into the fortress! Now where?  Oh, it's through that next arch! Mountain troop equipment, WW1 Paintings recording past military events Some of the 'unpleasant' past remembered
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    Military Museum (Heeresgeschichtliches Museum)

    by WulfstanTraveller Written Nov 2, 2004

    Also called Das Arsenal, this is an excellent general military museum covering all apsects of the military history of Austria, all thr ay through the Habsburg dynasty into the present republic. The building is extremely ornate, being built arund 1850 theoretically as an arsenal/barracks but in reality primarily to showcase Austria's impressively grand-looking, but by then no longer very effective, military.

    It is not restricted to the army and covers Austria's relatively brief period as a moderate naval power in the Mediterranean.

    It also contains artifacts from the momentous 1914 assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, which sprked WWI. These include the car in which he was riding and his uniform.

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    Military History Museum - Archduke Exhibit

    by yooperprof Written Nov 4, 2003

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    One of the most fascinating exhibits at the Military History Museum is the one associated with the ill-fated Archduke Franz Ferdinand, he who was assinated on June 28,1914, and whose death provoked the crisis which unleased World War I. The Museum has the limousine in the Archduke and his wife (Sophie Chotek) were riding when they were gunned down by the Bosnian Serb nationalist Gavrilo Princep. They also have the uniform - still bloodstained - which Franz Ferdinand was wearing when he was shot.

    The origins of World War I
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