Jewish Vienna, Vienna

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sights and places of Jewish life in Vienna

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  • Holocaust Memorial.
    Holocaust Memorial.
    by breughel
  • The Holocaust memorial in Vienna
    The Holocaust memorial in Vienna
    by yvgr
  • The Holocaust memorial in Vienna
    The Holocaust memorial in Vienna
    by yvgr
  • Sharrie's Profile Photo

    Walking tour

    by Sharrie Updated Jul 28, 2008

    Others do a much better job than I do about historical facts and events. So here are some references I found on the net should you wish to know more about Jewish Vienna:

    Jewish Vienna Heritage And Mission
    History Tour

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  • Pavlik_NL's Profile Photo

    Holocaust memorial and Vienna's Jewish past

    by Pavlik_NL Updated Nov 20, 2007

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    The memorial for the Holocaust in Vienna
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    Like many large European cities, Vienna too had it's Jewish quarter. And also like many occupied European cities, in this Jewish quarter many were arrested in the second worldwar and put on transport to the horror of the concentration camps. To commemorate these black pages in history in the middle of what used to be (and party still is) the Jewish quarter, a monument is erected. The quarter further offers a Jewish synagoge and the former mansions of some wealthy Jewish families.

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  • MLW20's Profile Photo

    Vienna Synagogue- Stadtempel

    by MLW20 Written Sep 26, 2006

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    Inside the temple
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    There are about 15 synagogues in Vienna but the only one surviving from pre-WWII is the Vienna Synagogue. To visit you must take a tour which has limited times and very tight security.

    This is an Orthodox synagogue with an impressive round sanctuary and separte seating area for women. The tour doesn't take long and it is worth a visit.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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  • MLW20's Profile Photo

    Jewish Museum of the City of Vienna

    by MLW20 Written Sep 26, 2006

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    Museum entrance
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    The Jewish Museum had some pretty interesting exhibits. You start on the top floor where they have a storage room showing some of their collection. Our favorite exhibit was the holograms. There are about 10 holograms and the audioguide tells you a bit about each.

    Make sure to get the free audioguide.

    Related to:
    • Religious Travel
    • Arts and Culture

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  • Gili_S's Profile Photo

    Juedisches Museum Wien

    by Gili_S Written Jun 11, 2005

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    The Jewish museum combined history, memorial, library, archive, all what related to old and modern Jewish life in this city and this region in general. Might even be that if I would search deep inside old archives I will even find old roots of my family from the Österreich-Ungarn period.

    Related to:
    • Museum Visits
    • Historical Travel

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  • Hosell's Profile Photo

    JEWISH QUARTER

    by Hosell Written Oct 10, 2004

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    The Jewish Quarter in Vienna,is located next to the riverside.This is another nice place to walk and see all the old buildings and architecture,even though all best buildings,palaces and churches are located in the center.

    There are also a lot of small restaurants and shops.

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  • Jmill42's Profile Photo

    Judenplatz

    by Jmill42 Written Mar 19, 2004

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    The Shoah Memorial

    Judenplatz has become a place of remembrance for Jewish and non-Jewish alike. It contains a memorial, the Shoah, and is located on a site of an ancient
    medieval synagogue, which can be visited when you tour Misrachi House (Judenplatz 8).

    The Shoah Memorial was built to serve as a reminder of the crimes of the Holocaust and other events in the persectution of Jews in Austria. It was designed by a British artist Rachel Whiteread for victims of the Shoah.

    It is a massive concrete cube, 10 x 7 meters, and ~4 meters high. The names of the 65,000 Austrian Jews who were killed are carved into the tiles around the memorial.

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  • Jugendplatz

    by in4ik Written Mar 5, 2004

    Judenplatz was originally the site of the city's medieval Jewish ghetto, dating as far back as the twelfth century, and during the building of the Holocaust memorial, excavations revealed the smoke-blackened remains of the ghetto's chief synagogue, which was burnt to the ground in 1421. The foundations, and a few modest finds, can now be viewed in the Museum Judenplatz (Mon–Thurs & Sun 10am–6pm, Fri 10am–2pm; öS42/€3.00), whose entrance is at no. 8. In addition, there's a short video with an English audio guide, and an interactive multimedia exhibition, both on medieval Jewish life in Vienna.

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  • Judenplatz

    by in4ik Written Mar 5, 2004
    Jewish street

    Taking either of the two alleyways that lead north from Schulhof brings you to Judenplatz, one of the prettiest little squares in Vienna, now totally dominated by a bleak concrete mausoleum designed by British sculptor Rachel Whiteread as a Holocaust Memorial, and unveiled in 2000. Smothered in row upon row of concrete casts of books like an inside-out library, the bunker-like memorial deliberately jars with its surroundings; a chilling A to Z of Nazi death camps is inscribed into its low plinth. Ironically, Judenplatz already has a much older memorial commemorating the pogrom of 1421, and clearly visible on the oldest house on the square, Zum grossen Jordan (The Great Jordan), at no. 2. However, in this case, the inscription, beside a sixteenth-century relief of the Baptism of Christ, celebrates the slaughter, when the Jews were driven out of Vienna. The lucky ones fled to Hungary, the rest were burnt at the stake, or – to avoid that fate – killed by the chief rabbi, who then committed suicide.

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  • Imbi's Profile Photo

    Monument against war and fascism.

    by Imbi Updated Nov 17, 2003

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    On 12th March 1945 a bombing raid destroyed Philipp_Hoff , a magnificent building built in nineteenth century.
    This monument was unveiled in 1988, it is neither a sign for victory or war.
    I tried to find out more about it but unfortunately everything was written in German but after looking around I found a board, which stated the history of it.

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  • margaretvn's Profile Photo

    Judenplatz

    by margaretvn Written Aug 19, 2003

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    This is the site of the Jewish ghetto in Medieval times. In the centre of the square is a statue by Siegfried Charoux of the German playwright and critic -Ephraim Lessing. His works plea for tolerance towards the Jews and the Nazis tookoffence to this tribute. They destroyed it in 1939 but it was later re-designed by the same sculptor and re-instated in the square.
    In 1996 Rachel Whiteread was the winner of a competition to design a monument for the Jewish victims of the Nazi regime. It was unvieled on the 9th of November 1999 - the anniversary of the Kristal Nacht. On a personal note I do not like the design very much - but that is my own personal thoughts.
    Also on the Square is a plaque recording that Mozart once lived at numbers 3-4 but the houses are not open to the public. Number 8 is a lovely Baroque house which is the only remaining Jewish institution in the square. It houses a school, a prayerhouse and a restaurant.
    sorry but I have to replace my old photos next visit!

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Family Travel

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  • yooperprof's Profile Photo

    The Jewish Museum

    by yooperprof Written Aug 10, 2003

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    Not all of the past is glorious

    Although it is small, I would definitely say that the Jüdisches Museum is a "must-see" for anyone who is spending more than 24 hours in the city. It's important not just too see what is here, it's important also to think about what's not here - or rather, "who's not here," namely Vienna's formerly large and formerly flourishing Jewish community. At one time that community was an integral part of Vienna, and Vienna's Jews made important contibutions in the Arts, Education, and the Professions. But Jewish life in Vienna was stamped out during the years of Nazism, and left a gap in Vienna's culture which has never truly been filled. The Jewish Museum has a few permanent displays, but when I was there most of its space was dedicated to an excellent exhibit concerning the Jewish contribution to the musical life of the Vienna.

    Related to:
    • Historical Travel
    • Museum Visits

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  • Audrey118's Profile Photo

    Schwedenplatz~ synagogue

    by Audrey118 Written Jun 30, 2003
    jewish synagogue

    This is probably the most important Jewish temple in Vienna. It is the only Jewish temple to survive the Nazis during the Crystal Night of 9-10 Nov 1938.

    Worthy to take note of the history is that during Jospeh II, no non Christian building is allowed to show its facade towards the street, and thus the facade is modified with the temple built inside a complex.

    Related to:
    • Family Travel

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  • Emmjai's Profile Photo

    Monument against War and Fascism

    by Emmjai Written Sep 29, 2003
    Just look at the detail on the face

    A truely moving monument, just look at it. Possibley the bit of Vienna that made the biggest impact on me

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    • Arts and Culture
    • Historical Travel

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  • Imbi's Profile Photo

    Judenplatz

    by Imbi Written Jan 20, 2003

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    As the name suggests, this was the site of the citys first Jewish ghetto, dating as far back as the 12th century. It remained at the heart of the Jewish community on and off for centuries,

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