Karlskirche - St Charles Church, Vienna

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Kreuzherrengasse 1, 1040 Wien +43 1 5046187

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    the Old Testament angel
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  • vpas's Profile Photo

    Take a leisurely walk around the whole area

    by vpas Written Jun 6, 2010

    The area around is filled with so many beautiful buildings -- the museum,the opera house,the rathouse,the parliament and so on that it is a good idea to take a walk and admire the buildings.While at it,you could take a break/picnic at the bundesgarten.Dont forget your camera!

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    St Charles Church

    by tim07 Updated Feb 25, 2010

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    This magnificent Baroque church with its dome and two giant pillars is such a beautiful building. The church was built as a vow taken by Emperor Charles VI during the plague of 1713, it was completed in 1737. It's dedicated to the patron saint of the Habsburg Emperor, St Charles Borromeo.

    Inside the church the dome is covered in colourful frescoes depicting St Charles Borromeo ascending into heaven.

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  • Manara's Profile Photo

    Beautiful baroque

    by Manara Updated Oct 12, 2009

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    The beautiful Karlskirche is the only church I will mention, for the simple reason that it is not within the Ring. The other most beautiful churches of Vienna are in that area, so they are virtually impossible to miss.
    The St. Karl it is dedicated to is actually an Italian, San Carlo Borromeo, from the aristocratic family that owned the beautiful little islands in the Lago Maggiore.
    Built in the baroque style, it has an unusual feature in the two big columns, modelled on the example of the Trajan Column in Rome.

    Karlskirche

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  • Jim_Eliason's Profile Photo

    Karls Kirche

    by Jim_Eliason Written Jul 26, 2009

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    This church was built in 1739 by Emporer Karl VI in thanks for the end of a plague outbreak in Vienna in 1713. Admission to the church is free but there is a charge to go up to the dome, which is well worth it not only for the views of Vienna but also for the friezes painted on the inside of the dome.

    Karls Kirche Karls Kirche Karls Kirche Karls Kirche Karls Kirche
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  • Andrew_W_K's Profile Photo

    The Karlskirche

    by Andrew_W_K Written May 23, 2009

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    A wonderful baroque church that is situated on Karlsplatz. The church was built in the first part of the 18th century by King Charles 6th who promised to build a church to St. Charles Borromeo, an Italian bishop from the 16th century who helped plague victims, if the plague in Vienna stopped. It's a slightly odd looking building as it has 2 towers in front of the church but not part of it, depicting scenes from St Charles life.
    The interior is no less impressive with marble and gilt decoration and beautiful frescoes on the upper walls and dome.
    When I was there in May 2009 it was possible to take an elevator up into the heart of the dome and then proceed by stairs to the very top to view the frescoes. I'm not sure if this a feature there all the time or if it was there while work was being carried out.
    Entrance to the church and lift was 6 euros.
    There is also a museum dedicated to Borromeo.

    The Karlskirche Karlskirche - Interior Karlskirche - Frescoes
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  • alyf1961's Profile Photo

    KARLSKIRCHE

    by alyf1961 Updated May 10, 2009

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    Fischer von Erlach designed Karlskirche in 1737. The church is dedicated to St Charles Borromeo, who was the patron saint of the plague. The church is 236 feet high and is the tallest baroque church in Vienna. The dome was inspired by St Peters dome in Rome.

    KARLSKIRCHE KARLSKIRCHE

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  • adema29's Profile Photo

    It is a must to see it....

    by adema29 Written Feb 14, 2009

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    We had the chance to stay in a hotel near the Karlskirche for few days and we couldn't miss it.
    My son was happy to climb the stairs to the “lantern” on top of dome and enjoy the view of the city from that place.
    The church itself has a nice architecture, with the two columns (so similar to the Trajan's Column in Rome) "protecting" the main neo-classical entrance (one of the first signs of the neoclassical architecture), and the wonderful Baroque dome and towers.
    It will be easy for us to remember the unique, unusual architecture.
    The nice church was built at the beginning of 18th century as the Emperor Charles VI has promised during the Black Plague.

    If you feel good at height don’t hesitate to go up to the top using the lift. Up there try to see everything as I did, like one of the Master J. M. Rottmayr’s apprentice, painting the huge dome, sitting on the wooden scaffolds and hanging his legs at 70 meters above the floor.

    Night view Baroque... Architecture-Karlskirche Racursi at Karlskirche View to the Dome-Karlskirche

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  • wadekorzan's Profile Photo

    Don't miss the Karlskirche (Charles Church)

    by wadekorzan Written Jan 1, 2009

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    The Karlskirche (Charles Church) is located very close to the subway stop called "Karlsplatz", along the subway line U1. The church is absolutely amazing, but more from the outside than from the inside. It's really worth just to go to the big square in front of the church--there's a big round fountain in front of it--and jus sit there and admire the architecure from the outside. Especially nice is the reflection of the church in the fountain in front--really a great place to sit and reflect, literally! The most amazing aspect of the church exterior are the two massive columns, built as a replica of the Trajan's column in Rome.

    The church was finished in 1730 and was built after the emperor, Charles VI, had made a promise he made that he would build the church if the Black Plague would leave the city.

    Important tip: If you go inside, don't expect too much! Otherwise, you'll be disappointed--as the exterior of the church is much more ornate than the interior!

    Opening hours:
    Monday - Saturday: 09:00 - 12:30, 13:00-18:00.
    Sunday and holidays: 12:00 - 17:45.
    Last entrance possible at 17:30.

    One important tip:

    Karlskirche at night with the Christmas Market
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  • easterntrekker's Profile Photo

    Karlskirche

    by easterntrekker Written Sep 7, 2008

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    This 18th-century church is considered one of Europe's greatest works of baroque architecture. The church was commissioned by Emperor Charles VI as an appeal to St. Borromeo to protect the city from the plague, which had killed more than 8,000 victims. . Monday-Saturday 9 am-12:30 pm and 1-6 pm, Sunday and holidays noon-5:45 pm. 6 euros adults, 4 euros children to tour the church and to ride the panorama elevator.

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  • BruceDunning's Profile Photo

    Karlschirche-The best

    by BruceDunning Updated Aug 1, 2008

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    Church of St. Charles Boromeo. Built at request of Emporer Karl VI in 1713 to honor is vows during the plague. It took 25 years to finish. The cupola is 210 feet tall, and columns are 150 feet. It ended up being over budget and therefore, the gilded gold inside and the detail is intricate. One of the most beautiful in Europe, it is Austrian Baroque designed by Johann von Erlach. The twop columns in front are representation of Borromeo, a saint.
    It was built in 1713 by Charles VI edict to recognize the plague ending, and named after Charles Borromeo, healer of the plague.

    postcard view
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  • AnnS's Profile Photo

    View The Karlskirche Dome Close Up

    by AnnS Written Apr 10, 2008

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    Karlskirche is a beautiful church and the exterior is worth close examination. I particularly liked the two intricately carved columns, inspired by Trajan's Column in Rome.

    I usually object to paying to visit places of worship but as the proceeds here go to obvious restoration work, I didn't mind too much. The cost, with a Vienna Card, was 5 euros.

    The interior is impressive with a lot of beautifully coloured marble and a very ornate high altar.

    There was a scaffolding structure which, on closer inspection, contained a lift taking visitors up to a viewing platform in the dome. Once up there, we were rewarded with a close-up view of the amazing frescoes that decorate it and they are truly beautiful. From the platform, you can climb further flights of steps right up into the cuppola. I was hoping for amazing views of Vienna from the top but sadly, there were only small and heavily meshed windows. However, there were more dark and beautiful frescoes which could never be seen from the ground so it was worth the climb.

    Detail of the Karlskirche Dome Karlskirche Exterior Detail of Karlskirche Column Karlskirche High Altar Steps to the Cuppola of Karlskirche
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  • von.otter's Profile Photo

    A Sunny Train Stop

    by von.otter Written Feb 5, 2008

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    “It is possible to be progressive in art by very simple means and by keeping to useful and economic conditions as well.”
    — Otto Wagner, (1841–1918), on his approach to design

    Train Stop In 1892 Otto Wagner was commissioned to design the stations for Vienna’s newly developed metro system. For the Karlsplatz stop he designed two facing pavilions of gilded metal and marble. The sunflower, Wagner’s favorite, is the dominant motif (see photos for details of these pavilions).

    Completed in 1898 but no longer used by riders today, in warm weather, one pavilion serves as a café, the other as an art gallery dedicated to their pioneering architect/designer.

    The 100-year-old design meets the standard of a classic: timeless, yet, fresh. Two otherwise utilitarian buildings have been transformed into an enduring work of art. Charming!

    Detail Karlsplatz Metro Stop, December 2001 Detail Karlsplatz Metro Stop, December 2001
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  • von.otter's Profile Photo

    Roman Inspiration : Karlskirche

    by von.otter Updated Feb 5, 2008

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    “Be sure that you first preach by the way you live. If you do not, people will notice that you say one thing, but live otherwise, and your words will bring only cynical laughter and a derisive shake of the head.”
    — Saint Charles Borromeo (1538–1584)

    Master of the Baroque in Vienna, Johann Bernhard Fischer von Erlach looked to Ancient Rome and Renaissance Rome for the elements that he so skillfully combined in 1715 to create Karlskirche (the Church of St. Charles).

    To give thanks to God for delivering Vienna from plague that swept the city in 1713, Emperor Karl VI made a vow to build a church dedicated to San Carlo Borromeo. As Archbishop of Milan Our Saint had ministered to those sick and dying of plague in his city in 1576.

    The two free-standing front columns are decorated with scenes from Our Saint’s life. The left column shows his steadfastness, the right illustrates his courage. Both were inspired by Trajan’s Column in Rome. The triangular pediment and columns of the front porch are designed after Rome’s Pantheon. And the dramatic green copper, 236-foot high dome pays homage to St. Peter’s; Karlskirche is a landmark on the Viennese skyline.

    The Angel of the Old Testament is to the left of the front steps; the Angel of the New Testament stands to the right (see photos #2 and #3).

    This church is quite visible, standing as it does outside the narrow quarters of the center of the city, with land surrounding it, its many splendid elements can be better appreciated.

    And to Heaven On the high altar San Carlo is assumed into Heaven with hosts of angels to guide his way (see photo #5). Our Saint is the patron of apple orchards, catechists, seminarians, and starch makers; he’s invoked against stomachaches and ulcers.

    Now here’s a thought: the same artist, Lorenzo Mattielli, who created this masterpiece also carved those rock-hard muscular Hercules in front of the Michaelertrakt! (see von.otter’s Vienna travelogue “Hercules in Stone” for photos)

    Karlskirche, Vienna, December 2001 Angel of the Old Testament, Vienna, 12/01 Angel of the New Testament, Vienna, 12/01 Karlskirk, High Altar & Nave, Vienna, 12/01 Karlskirk, High Altar, Vienna, 12/01
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  • Pavlik_NL's Profile Photo

    Karlskirche: largest Baroque church in the world

    by Pavlik_NL Updated Nov 20, 2007

    As already said: Vienna is by far the Baroque capitol in the world and the summum of this Baroque can be found on the Karlsplatz (Charles Place): the Karlskirche (Charles Church). This church is a true masterpiece of architecture. The church is made of fine white stones and contrasts wonderfully with the green cuprum roof. The central dome rises up high in between two fine decorated columns. Don't hasitate to go inside, as the beauty here is even finer and more spectacular then the outsie already is.

    A view that one can enjoy for hours Fine Baroc works everywhere in the Karlskirche Inside the beauty just doesn't stop

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  • leffe3's Profile Photo

    Karlskirche

    by leffe3 Updated Nov 12, 2007

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    The Karlskirche is one of Vienna's greatest buildings, a Baroque edifice built in celebration of the abatement of the Black Plague that was sweeping Vienna and Europe at the time.

    In 1713, Emperor Charles VI vowed that should the Black Plague abate, he would build a church dedicated to his namesake, St Charles Borromeo, who had nursed plague victims in his native Milan in the 16th century. The plague did abate and the Emperor bought in the great architect of the day, Johann Bernard Fischer von Erlach, who designed the celebration of God's prayers (and the place of the Habsburgs in the social structure). von Erlach worked on it from 1716 until his death in 1722, with the building being completed by his son. Joseph Emanuel, in 1737. Like the structure itself, the extraordinary internal frescoes are a celebration of a father/son relationship, with the Rottmayr's painting the interior of the church.

    It was not universally acclaimed, regarded as something of an oddity with its combination of architectural elements - ancient Greece (the columned entrance porch), ancient Rome (the Trajan columns), contemporary Rome (the Baroque dome) and contemporary Vienna (the Baroque towers). And, with the best form of flattery being imitation, the Karlskirche was never copied.

    Open: Monday-Friday 7:30am-7pm; Saturday 8:30am-7pm; Sunday 9am-7pm
    Entrance fee pyable: 4€ adults, 2.50€ children 6-18, free for children under 6

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